Faith Berry

Chief historian of the USDA Forest Service to present " Homeowners and Fire on the Forest Edge" on October 23

Blog Post created by Faith Berry Employee on Sep 28, 2015

Lincoln Bramwell, Ph.D., the Chief Historian for the USDA Forest Service, will be a featured speaker on Friday October 23rd at the Backyards & Beyond Wildfire Education Conference. He will be speaking about how homeowners expose themselves to an environmental force beyond their control when they build homes in wildfire prone areas. 

The synopsis for his presentation states: “Residential developments nestled along the forest edge created a tremendous problem for wildfire managers.  Unable to change the economic and political forces that propelled suburban sprawl into wildfire vulnerable areas, fire managers instead respond by asking for increased budgets and human resources to fight fires more aggressively, creating a false sense of security and outsized expectations from homeowners.” 

Conference participants will learn more about how public expectations, firefighting success, accumulating fuels, climate change and more people moving into wilderness areas has created a prescription for the inevitable wildland urban interface fire situation.

Dr. Bramwell will also be available to sign copies of his new book, Wilderburbs, Communities on Nature’s Edge. A synopsis on Amazon.com says,“Wilderburbs tells the story of how roads and houses and water Wilderburbsdevelopment have transformed the rural landscape in the West. If
you have a copy bring it along, if not, you may purchase a copy onsite.  Bramwell introduces readers to developers, homeowners, and government regulators, all of whom have faced unexpected environmental problems in designing and building wilderburb communities, including unpredictable water supplies, threats from wildfires, and encounters with wildlife. By looking at wilderburbs in the West, especially those in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Bramwell uncovers the profound environmental consequences of Americans’ desire to live in the wilderness.”

Outcomes