Marie Snow

The first Firewise USA™ site in Illinois shares their success story

Blog Post created by Marie Snow Employee on Feb 12, 2018

Midland Hills Country Club has transformed their community in just their first year of participating in the Firewise USA™ Program. I interviewed residents Margaret Anderson and Jesse Riechman as we featured their Firewise USA™ site in the January 2018 newsletter for the Northeast Region Cohesive Strategy Committee (NE RSC).

Midland Hills Community members came together to celebrate their recognition as a Firewise USA site. Photo Courtesy: Margaret Anderson

I choose the community because they are the first in the state of Illinois and they have done a lot of work to reduce their wildfire risk. Speaking with these residents I was even more energized to write about their Firewise USA™ site because of the pride they have for their community and the work they’ve done.

 

Margaret Anderson told me she loves living in the community because they value their privacy and it’s a great place to enjoy outdoor activities like hiking. It’s this pride for her community that made her want to work with her neighbors to become a recognized Firewise USA™ site.

 

One of the challenges that some Firewise USA™ sites can sometimes struggle with is keeping participation high. Midland Hills Country Club is a unique community where the land is co-owned by the Homeowners Association.

 

Because of this, it was very important that residents agreed on the work they did on their land to reduce their wildfire risk.

 

Read how their community came together and their advice for others who want to participate in the Firewise USA™ Program in this month’s issue of the NE RSC’s newsletter.

Midland Hills receiving their Firewise USA plaque for the work they have done to reduce their wildfire risk. Photo Courtesy: Margaret Anderson

 

The Northeast Regional Strategy Committee works to support the mission of the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy which includes restoring and maintaining resilient landscapes, creating Fire-Adapted Communities and effectively responding to wildfire.

 

 

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