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2018
This graphic shows three homes and their overlapping home ignitions zones.  The overlap demonstrates the need for neighbors to work together to reduce their shared risk from wildfires.
A cornerstone of the Firewise USA® recognition program criteriais completing a wildfire risk assessment. The assessment helps residents and communities understand their wildfire risk and guides them in future risk reduction efforts.
We are pleased to announce that we have updated our Community Wildfire Risk Assessmenttool! The new form reflects current research around home destruction versus home survival in a wildfire. Focusing on the threat from embers and surface fires, the assessment tool helps users to look at the:
  • General condition of homes: are they made from ignition resistant materials?
  • Home ignition zones (Immediate, intermediate, and extended): are residents reducing and managing vegetation to influence and decrease fire behavior?
  • Common/open space areas or adjacent public lands: are there any present and are they being managed?
The new format also makes a community’s summary and recommendations easier to achieve and applied to its action plan. 
Just like our previous assessment, this is one tool available to guide residents and communities. States have the ability to designate their own template and special requirements for Firewise USA® participants. Before starting, please contact your state liaisonto determine their process.

 

You can create a wildfire success story in your own community by participating in wildfire safety project work on Wildfire Prep Day. Wildfire Community Preparedness Day this year it is May 4, 2019. NFPA® will again be offering project funding awards to 150 communities across the United States. Each of these $500 awards provided with past generous support from State Farm, can be used to complete a wildfire safety project where you live!
There are some simple steps you can follow to help you create a successful project including:
1. Collaborate with all stakeholders in your neighborhoods including local water districts and other utilities, volunteer organizations including CERT groups, Fire Safe Councils, Firewise USA® sites, park districts, schools, public works departments etc. (You might even find some additional help from these sources)
2. Identify one goal to be completed. It is better to start with something simple, that you can be successful at. Don’t try to do something too complicated for your first project.
3. Identify what other resources might be made available to your community to help you complete your project such as; tools, power equipment, vehicles, youth volunteers and financial sponsorship etc.
Don't forget to share with others what you are doing and when by using social media, newsletters, flyers, local radio, television and more to promote the success you create to help others be successful.
Still not sure what kind of project to do to improve your neighborhood and home safety? Check out the Wildfire Community Preparedness Day web-page for stories of successful project work completed with past award funding in 2018and 2017.  

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