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2019

Map showing point locations of the one hundred fifty $500 Wildfire Community Preparedness Day funding awards.

Point locations of the one hundred fifty $500 Wildfire Community Preparedness Day funding awards.

Communities from across the nation applied for Wildfire Community Preparedness Day funding awards to help them complete a project on Saturday, May 4th.   These one hundred fifty, $500 awards provided with generous support from State Farm are going to be given to communities in 27 states from across the United States to help create neighborhoods that are safer from wildfire loss.  NFPA® is pleased to announce the winners of the funding awards.  The winning applications shared incredible narratives about the project work these communities intend to complete on Prep Day, May 4th.

Everyone who takes action to make their homes and the landscape surrounding their home safer from wildfire losses are all winners!  NFPA® provides great resources to help you embark on a journey of creating communities that are more resilient in the event of a wildfire.  You can be a winner too!  Check out information about many of the improvements you can make to your home and the landscape surrounding your home that can help make where you live and those you care about better protected.  Many of these changes and improvement projects do not have to cost a lot of money.  Simple things like cleaning out your gutter, sweeping your porch, and cleaning flammable materials from under your deck can all make a big difference!

Will you survive the next wildfire?  Find out how you can be a winner and encourage others to be a part of this National Campaign on May 4th.

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People raking vegetation debris as part of their Wildfire Prep Day activity

Wildfire safety preparedness is something that we all have a part to play no matter who we are.   Communities across the country have come together to work on wildfire risk reduction projects that have made a difference.   Their stories serve as an inspiration to others, that wildfire safety project work can be merely a matter of elbow grease and good old fashioned neighborhood participation.  Thanks to a generous donation from State Farm 150 communities from across the United States will get $500 to use on a wildfire safety project along with a beautiful free 3 foot by 5 foot banner to promote what they are doing.

 

Last year one of the $500 award winners Falls Creek in Durango, Colorado survived the 416 Fire due in large part to the wildfire safety project work completed by the community both to their homes and the landscape immediately surrounding their homes.  Their work was applauded in the Inci Web report for the fire by the supervising fire officer.

Little girl with shovel at a Wildfire Prep Day event

Will you be a wildfire safety superstar this year? This is your chance to tell others what you are doing on Wildfire Community Preparedness Day.  Map your wildfire safety project on the Wildfire Community Preparedness Day page for free to let others know where your project is so they can jump in and give you a hand.

 

Don’t know where to start?   Check out this handy, free downloadable toolkit.   In it you’ll find a project idea checklist, a beautiful, downloadable, fillable flyer to advertise the day, and a safety tip sheet to help keep you and your volunteers protected. Want to get a shout out to promote what you are doing locally?  Check out a fillable proclamation you can share with local elected officials.   

 

Let this be the year you take action!  The role that you play, no matter who you are, can make a difference. Participate in Wildfire Prep Day and be a part of creating safer communities and tell us what you are doing.  Be a wildfire safety hero.

 

 

Photo credit: Top - Bustins Island Wildfire Prep Day event, Faith Berry; Right - Wildfire prep day activity courtesy of April Van Hale

Research around home destruction vs. home survival during wildfires points to embers and small flames as the main way the majority of homes ignite. Did you know that every day household items we keep outside can contribute to the spread of flames as well as ember ignitions?

In the video, Dr. Jack Cohen, Fire Science Researcher with the USDA Forest Service (retired), discusses how to spot these items and provides two quick and easy steps that can help reduce the risk of them igniting. 

As Wildfire Community Preparedness Day draws near, use this opportunity to embark on a plan for how you’ll address wildfire safety around your home and property.  

Find additional information about Wildfire Community Preparedness Day and related project ideas on wildfireprepday.org.

The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) is conducting a full-scale demonstration live today, March 6.  According to a press release shared by IBHS they will cast embers at a fully built structure inside of their test laboratory in Chester County, South Carolina.  The test structure is built like a small family home.  One side of the structure resembles a home that follows wildfire resistant building and landscaping techniques, while the other side is built ignoring wildfire resistant building techniques.

Because embers or firebrands, small or larger pieces of burning materials that are spread by winds during wildfire events cause most home ignitions, this experiment will allow you to see where ember ignitions can occur in the home ignition zone during wildfire events.

The demonstration will be recorded so that you can view how homes ignite during wildfire events and learn why it is important for residents in wildfire-prone areas to make changes to the home and landscape immediately surrounding the home to reduce their risk of loss during a wildfire event.  Check out some of NFPA®’s resources to help you improve your safety before the next wildfire burns where you live.

Research around home destruction vs. home survival during wildfires points to embers and small flames as the main way the majority of homes ignite. While many of us may think that just our homes are at risk, there are places on our property like sheds, chicken coops, and other structures that are in danger too, and close enough to ignite and spread flames to the house.

In the video, Dr. Jack Cohen, Fire Science Researcher with the USDA Forest Service (retired), takes us on a tour of a local property and points out some of the key outbuildings that can pose a danger during a wildfire.

As Wildfire Community Preparedness Day draws near, use this opportunity to start thinking about wildfire safety at home and in your neighborhood. Find additional information about Wildfire Community Preparedness Day and related project ideas on wildfireprepday.org.

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