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2019

Small group working on an exercise in NFPA classroom

Register now for NFPA's Assessing Structure Ignition Potential from Wildfire two-day training in Nashville scheduled for May 16-17. This class will provide valuable skills and knowledge to help you in your wildfire safety mission.

Learn the science behind how homes ignite from wildfire. More importantly, find out the best ways to advise property owners about actions that will help prevent ignition and reduce the chances of home destruction during a brush or forest fire. 

Wildfires happen in the eastern United States. In November 2016, 33 wildfires burned more than 90,000 acres in Eastern Tennessee, North Georgia, and Western North Carolina, with deadly and destructive results in the Gatlinburg area. Fourteen people died and some 2,400 structures were destroyed.

Discover what others have learned. According to one captain/paramedic, “I thought I wanted to learn about structure triage. What I got was a new mindset concerning how to approach wildland fire (operational) and people (social).” Another fire captain commented, “I am better prepared to assess WUI properties and communicate hazards to community members.”

Don't delay - register today and join your colleagues and expert instructor in Nashville! 

A one-day hackathon is being hosted on the 42 Silicon Valley Campus in recognition of Wildfire Community Preparedness Day on May 4, 2019. The goal of a hackathon is to get computer programmers, graphic designers, interface designers, project managers, and others together in one place to create software or other functioning projects for a specific purpose.

Recognizing the deadly 2018 wildfire season which caused $9 billion dollars in damage, IBM and other supporters including David Clark Cause as part of a multi-year global initiative, are rallying developers to create positive change by developing applications based on cloud, data, and AI (artificial intelligence) that can help create changes in wildfire and emergency preparedness. This hackathon is part of a larger project called Call for Code® which encourages developers to volunteer to be a part of helping design positive change.

California residents are especially encouraged to participate to help create new solutions. According to the event description, “Californians have a unique perspective that can help drive innovation in this field. Developers, makers, and builders have lived through disasters and know what is at stake. Bring your best!”

Registration for the event is free. The event starts promptly at 8 AM PDT in Fremont, California and ends at 6 PM. Parts of the event will be recorded. This is one great way to help create neighborhoods that are safer from wildfires on Wildfire Community Preparedness Day! What will you be doing?

This Old House host Kevin O’Connor interviewed Dan Gorham, from The Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS®) to learn techniques for making homes safer during wildfire events.   This Old House a television show dedicated to sharing step by step tactics to make home improvement projects easy for anyone has added a new Ask This Old House segment about project work to improve the survival of your home on its latest show.

Dan talked to Kevin about the fact that houses are burned during wildfires mainly because embers generated during a wildfire ignite combustible materials close to the home.  He also shared some ways people can make improvements to the home by using noncombustible building materials and making landscaping improvements especially within the 0-5 foot area around the home.  Check out this segment of This Old House on You Tube; https://youtu.be/D1WxCBU6JAM

And for more resources that you can use to make your home safer from wildfire check out NFPA® research fact sheets produced in collaboration with IBHS. The topics covered include making improvements to decks, attics and crawl spaces, coatings, fencing and more!  

Image of WUI community from NFPA's Community Wildfire Safety through Regulation guide

The American Planning Association (APA) has just published a new report that is available at no cost to download (though users have to create a guest account and password to log in), thanks to the sponsorship of the USDA Forest Service as well as state and private forestry programs. The report specifically looks at the wildfire-related risks faced by two-thirds of the population of the United States, emphasizing that many more areas outside the West are vulnerable. One need only look at the past few week's news stories to recognize this, including reports of an 11,000 acre fire in New Jersey, a wildfire in the panhandle of Florida, and multiple smaller fires that broke out in North Carolina.

The purpose of the report, "Planning the Wildland-Urban Interface," is to provide planners with some tools to make better planning choices to help create more resilient neighborhoods. The report states, “Planners across the country have important roles to play in helping communities reduce their vulnerability to the destructive and tragic consequences of wildfires such as the Camp Fire.” It provides useful resources including references to NFPA standards for new construction and NFPA's Firewise USA program.

The report explores the fact that those who choose to live in beautiful areas that are close to nature must be aware of what their risk is and take appropriate steps to reduce their risk of loss. Everyone has a part to play. Read the report to get some information about how planners can participate in helping to design WUI communities that are safer from wildfire loss. 

 

Image from NFPA's Community Wildfire Safety through Regulation: A Best Practices Guide for Planners and Regulators, 2013.

Your successful Wildfire Community Preparedness Day project can not only help your community be safer in the event of a wildfire event but also shine as an example of success for other communities to copy.   Remember the old adage; “Copying is the best form of flattery.”  Just think your success and your success story can actually help another community somewhere be able to make their own project plan in the future.

You may be wondering how you can share your success story with others.  Did you know NFPA® has free downloadable resources to help your project shine like a star in the night sky!  

For example a new resource on the Wildfire Community Preparedness Day webpage is a press release template to help you connect with local media outlets to share the good work that you are accomplishing.  To take great photos to go along with your press release NFPA created another new resource that gives you tips on taking good photos of your project work.

There is also some great information in another new free downloadable piece the Wildfire Community Preparedness Day Toolkit.  This piece even provides you with a beautifully designed flyer that you can very easily personalize, print and distribute in locations like your local library and schools.

Share what you are doing on social media on the Firewise USA® Facebook page.  Or tweet your success at #WildfirePrepDay.  Shout out your success you can become a wildfire superstar this year!   You can be the person who helps, save a home, lives and neighborhoods.  Learn more about how you can participate in this national campaign today.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is looking for assistance from community members in Sevier County, Tennessee who were affected by the Chimney Tops Fire in 2016.  They want to know more about their experiences and responses to emergency notifications during this wildfire incident and are asking people to complete a survey online or by telephone.

NIST will use the survey results to help improve emergency messaging, training and education of emergency personnel and to develop evacuation models that can be used for wildfire planning.  According to a press release from NIST, “The study may lead to the development of changes that could improve current standards and practices so that communities across the U.S. can become more resilient to natural hazards.”

The survey is being conducted for NIST by a research firm called the Fors Marsh Group.  Some people living in the area were sent a letter in October 2018 with a web link to complete the survey, which according to NIST takes 20 minutes to complete. The survey sign-in page can be found at www.NISTfiresurvey.com and participants can either use a “personal code” they received in one of the letters mentioned above that were sent or can use their home address.  Additionally, if you are interested in participating you can also call the Fors Marsh Group at 877 891-2465.

 

Photo credit: Destroyed home in Sevier County, Tennessee, 2016, by Faith Berry, NFPA.

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