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2015

 


On a blistery cold morning in Fall River, Massachusetts, Firefighter Paul Machado and his crew were tasked with searching for a missing woman inside a two-and-a-half story home on fire. While inside the dwelling, their efforts were exacerbated by the fast-moving blaze, which knocked Machado to the ground.


He attempted to seek safety by heading down to the first floor, but the fire was too intense. Since his radio had melted, calling in a "Mayday" was impossible. His only opportunity for escape was to fling himself from a window. He sustained numerous injuries and burns from the incident. He was sidelined for a year during a painstaking recovery effort. Home fire sprinklers, he says, would have drastically altered the outcome of the fire.


 

Machado is the newest member of NFPA's Faces of Fire, a component of the[ Fire Sprinkler Initiative | http://www.firesprinklerinitiative.org] that underscores the human impact of fire. NFPA has collaborated with the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors to identify and showcase Machado and other Faces of Fire subjects. These personal stories are vastly important, as they showcase the devastation home fire leaves in its wake and tragedies thwarted thanks to sprinklers. They are also powerful tools that can help convince discerning code officials and legislative bodies that sprinkler requirements go beyond being a "cost issue." 


 

* !http://a7.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01bb08140847970d-120wi|src=http://a7.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01bb08140847970d-120wi|alt=Act-Now-small|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Act-Now-small|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a0162ff1d4766970d01bb08140847970d img-responsive!Please help spread Machado's story by:*


    • copying and pasting the YouTube URL into a Facebook post or Twitter tweet

    • embedding the video into a webpage

    • emailing the YouTube URL to your coworkers and share Paul's story with them

downloading a copy of the video from the Fire Sprinkler Initiative website and embedding it in a presentation on home fire safety/sprinklers


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/333788367_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/333788367_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Major sprinkler victory in New Jersey highlighted in recent edition of NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter
!http://i.zemanta.com/331151935_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/331151935_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!If you are looking for a succinct article underscoring the necessity of home fire sprinklers, this is it

 

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Two-and-a-half minutes. 


That's the amount of time it took a fire inside a wooden structure housing a sofa, end table, and other furnishings to reach flashover--the point when all objects in a room simultaneously hit their ignition temperature. Nothing living survives a flashover. Flames funneled out of the eight-by-eight mock living room as spectators, standing nearly 30 feet from the fire, felt the heat. The event, held at NFPA headquarters in Quincy, Massachusetts, to a group of more than 100 people, was too eye-catching to merely watch; many recorded it with their smartphones.


 

The majority of spectators have a vested interest in how quickly fire can spread in today's homes. They are members of the Massachusetts Building Commissioners and Inspectors Association. Its mission is to assist builders, legislators, and others involved in construction by fostering public safety, health, and welfare through education. North America's most effective sprinkler advocates can attest to the fact that there's nothing quite as educational as a live burn/sprinkler demonstration.


After the Quincy Fire Department extinguished the fire at the aforementioned structure, the second act commenced. Adjacent to the scorched structure was another mock living room with a crucial addition: sprinklers. Once the fire reached a certain temperature, the sprinkler activated, the fire lost its fierceness, and the fire department did minimal work to finish the job. 


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08108fc6970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08108fc6970d-120wi|alt=Act-Now-small|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Act-Now-small|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08108fc6970d img-responsive!
View a video and photos from the event, co-hosted by NFPA and the Massachusetts Fire Sprinkler Coalition, and download the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition's free fire and sprinkler burn demonstration kit, giving you step-by-step instructions on creating a similar event in your area.


 


!http://a5.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b7c76caf15970b-800wi|border=0|src=http://a5.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b7c76caf15970b-800wi|alt=Tim Travers|title=Tim Travers|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a0162ff1d4766970d01b7c76caf15970b image-full img-responsive!

NFPA Regional Sprinkler Specialist Tim Travers narrated the live burn/sprinkler demonstration in front of curious onlookers.



 

 !http://a0.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0f64870970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://a0.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0f64870970c-800wi|alt=Live burn demo structure|title=Live burn demo structure|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0f64870970c image-full img-responsive!



The aftermath of the structure not equipped with sprinklers.



 

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NFPA President Jim Pauley discussed how sprinklers greatly reduce the risk of dying in home fires.



!http://a2.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0f648f2970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://a2.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0f648f2970c-800wi|alt=Sprinklered structure|title=Sprinklered structure|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0f648f2970c image-full img-responsive!

Slippery when wet: no major damage to the sprinklered room.


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f58ef2970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f58ef2970c-320wi|alt=Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f58ef2970c img-responsive!The Garden State experienced a win in its push for increased safety in homes when the state Senate recently passed a bill to sprinkler all new, one- and two-family homes. The bill heads to the governor's desk for a signature. 


 

Learn about the massive fire that prompted this bill by reading the latest edition of NFPA'S Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter. Other news items include information on:


    • the deadly trio found in today's homes

    • NFPA's new Bringing Safety Home Grant, which gives sprinkler advocates the chance to secure $10,000 for localized advocacy efforts

    • water supply options for home fire sprinklers


 

Don't forget to *subscribe to the free newsletter* to receive North America's top sprinkler news delivered once a month to your inbox. 


!http://i.zemanta.com/333085446_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/333085446_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Secure up to $10,000 for home fire sprinkler advocacy efforts by applying for NFPA's Bringing Safety Home Grant
!http://i.zemanta.com/325176536_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/325176536_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Sprinklers kept fire in check at Washington State apartment complex
!http://i.zemanta.com/329064856_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329064856_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Legislator: The time for home fire sprinklers is now
!http://i.zemanta.com/329374571_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329374571_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA, Connecticut fire service, and array of safety advocates vocalize their support for new sprinkler bill at recent hearing

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f4d618970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f4d618970c-320wi|alt=Home-Fire-Deaths--Injuries|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Home-Fire-Deaths--Injuries|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f4d618970c img-responsive!NFPA has examined the demographics of fatal and non-fatal victims of home fires. The report, "Characteristics of Home Fire Victims," highlights the age, sex, race, and region of victims, giving safety advocates crucial information on important trends. 


Here are some key finds:


From 1980 to 2011, the percentage of fatal home fire victims under five years old fell from 18 to six percent.

During that same time frame, the number of fire victims over age 65 increased from 19 to 31 percent. More surprising is that 30 percent of all home fire fatalities were at least 65 years old, but this group represents only 13 percent of the U.S. population. 

    1. Males are more likely to be killed in a house fire than females.

    2. African Americans are twice as likely to be killed in these fires.

    3. The South, representing 37 percent of the U.S. population, has a higher fire and injury rate than any other region


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080f296e970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080f296e970d-120wi|alt=Act-Now-small|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Act-Now-small|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080f296e970d img-responsive!
Download the NFPA report,
as well as an infographic summarizing this important information, and share it with your fellow safety advocates. 


 


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor's harrowing experience highlighted in NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter

The United Kingdom recently celebrated Fire Sprinkler Week 2015, an event that encourages sprinkler installation in various settings via information-sharing and other activities was a vital component of this event.

 

While the event this year focused its messaging on the necessity of sprinklering educational and business establishments, home fire sprinklers got its fair share of attention. The devices, which have the approval of many in the U.K. fire service, made recent headlines after the English town of Oswestry decided to enact a pilot program that would install them in a two-bedroom bungalow. The head of a local fire and rescue service went a step further and called for sprinklering all new homes, citing similar, pro-sprinkler arguments used by sprinkler advocates in North America.</a>

&#0160;(The Welsh government has embraced this idea; the country will&#0160;[require sprinklers in all new homes starting in 2016.

 

For many vulnerable people, getting out of their home and away from a fire would be difficult, perhaps impossible,&quot; said Andy Blizard, head of the Shropshire, England, Fire &amp; Rescue Service&#39;s fire safety team, in a story that appeared on its website.

 

Even if they hear their smoke alarm it won't help them escape a fire. Sprinklers can remove that danger because they usually put a fire out and stop it from spreading room to room.&quot;

 

 

The article also states that England's Local Government Association, which represents the country's local councils, backs Shropshire Fire and Rescue's call to sprinkler all new homes. Also on board for increasing sprinkler protection in the U.K. is the Chief Fire Officers' Association.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080d2ba4970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080d2ba4970d-800wi|alt=Dollar signs|title=Dollar signs|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080d2ba4970d image-full img-responsive!
Looking to spread the word on the importance of home fire sprinklers in your community or state, but lack the necessary funds to create something spectacular?


 

Now&#39;s your chance to secure up to $10,000 through the Fire Sprinkler Initiative's Bringing Safety Home Grant Program, which&#0160; will&#0160;assist as many as 10 selected U.S. state sprinkler coalitions and other safety advocates throughout the United States and Canada by furthering activities that showcase the importance of fire sprinklers. Momentum around sprinkler advocacy continues to build as more and more residents and policy makers understand the value of installing these devices in new homes.


This grant comes at a time when fires continue to wreak havoc at home. In 2013, U.S. home fires killed nearly 2,800 people and injured more than 12,000 others. Since sprinklers can significantly reduce the risk of dying in the place where most fire deaths occur, furthering grassroots efforts is key to eliminating these tragedies and bolstering nationwide acceptance of these devices in new homes.


 

The grants are designed to fund local sprinkler campaigns and projects, or develop an array of educational endeavors that underscore the necessity of sprinklers. NFPA has developed a menu of options to choose from, but is also asking applicants to flex their creative muscles:


How can this grant help you spread the message in your state or region that sprinklers in new homes save lives?



Is there a new way to educate the public and decision makers about the value of home fire sprinklers?



How can you expand on a tried-and-true method of sprinkler advocacy?


 

The application deadline is April 20. For complete details, please visit the Fire Sprinkler Initiative site.


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/331821515_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/331821515_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Missouri summit thrusts home fire sprinklers into the spotlight
!http://i.zemanta.com/329755113_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329755113_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor's harrowing experience highlighted in NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f12dad970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f12dad970c-320wi|alt=Tennessee Fire Sprinkler Coalition|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Tennessee Fire Sprinkler Coalition|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f12dad970c img-responsive!Having witnessed 60 fire deaths over a span of 27 years, Assistant Fire Chief Danny Beeler fought back tears while urging a Tennessee Senate Commerce Committee to consider these losses. &quot;I&#39;ve seen too many bodies,&quot; Beeler, a member of the Tennessee Fire Sprinkler Coalition, told the committee, according to a story by the +Knoxville News Sentinel.+ &quot;Please don&#39;t take an action that will put (people) ... in greater danger.&quot;


 

This &quot;action&quot; &#0160;Beeler refers to is the passage of legislation that would prohibit the requirement of fire sprinkler systems for townhouses by any local or statewide adopted building codes. The law would also repeal any local ordinances already on the books.&#0160;


 

Beeler joined three other firefighters in front of the committee, but was the only one to testify. NFPA&#39;s Fire Sprinkler Initiative team supplied the advocates with information on Tennessee&#39;s civilian fire deaths in residential properties and talking points.&#0160;


Originally opposing the bill, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam's administration changed its tune after the inclusion of an amendment stating local governments, by way of a 2/3 vote by city council or county commission, can reenact sprinkler ordinances. The amendment, noted Beeler, doesn't go far enough to safeguard lives during residential fires. 


 

The Homebuilders Association of Tennessee supported the bill, according to the Sentinel,&#0160;adding that&#0160;the association spent upwards of $200,000 lobbying the Legislature last year.&#0160;


With a 7-1 vote, the committee approved the bill. 


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080b8c36970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080b8c36970d-120wi|alt=Act-Now-small|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Act-Now-small|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080b8c36970d img-responsive!
Show sprinkler opponents that safety should be prioritized at home. Join a state sprinkler coalition, and watch this video underscoring the coalition movement:&#0160;


 


 


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/329183401_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329183401_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Fire chief: Sprinklers would have prevented horrific fire that claimed a life

!http://i.zemanta.com/330847047_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/330847047_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Braving frigid temperatures, sprinkler advocates get legislators' attention with an outdoor display

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f03f16970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f03f16970c-800wi|alt=Tonya Hoover|title=Tonya Hoover|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f03f16970c image-full img-responsive!
California's path to a statewide sprinkler requirement was as long and windy as the Yellow Brick Road. Prior to the mandate taking effect in 2011, local communities, one-by-one, decided to embrace mandatory installations, the first city being San Clemente in 1979. Getting all stakeholders on board to expand the requirement statewide might have seemed like a feat for Oz, but fortunately State Fire Marshal Tonya Hoover knew how to make it happen. 


Despite the successes in California, Hoover is quick to point out that the statewide adoption "was only the beginning."


 

+NFPA Journal+ had a recent conversation with Hoover on the effective way her and her team brought builders, water purveyors, fire officials, and others to the table and initiated dialogue on what a statewide requirement would look like. She also discusses what issues cropped up post-mandate.


 

&quot;Even though we had more than 160 local jurisdictions with home fire sprinkler ordinances already in place before the statewide adoption, we still had areas of California that had never seen a home fire sprinkler, and this was a challenge for them,&quot; Hoover told NFPA Journal. &quot;Many wanted to know who was going to do the plan review. Some areas may have had water-supply issues. Other places worried whether there would be enough contractors to install sprinklers if homebuilding picked up. There were just all sorts of little things that crept up.&quot;


 

Hoover also offered this caveat: &quot;I think one of the biggest mistakes we could make would be to think that home fire sprinklers are chiseled in stone like the Ten Commandments. I believe that you have to continue the message, and the California Fire Sprinkler Coalition continues the message.&quot;


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080aadf9970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080aadf9970d-120wi|alt=Act-Now-small|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Act-Now-small|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb080aadf9970d img-responsive!

Obtain some inspiration from the California Fire Sprinkler Coalition by visiting its site, and hear some additional pearls of wisdom from Hoover:&#0160;




 


!http://i.zemanta.com/332266672_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/332266672_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!One community, two house fires, a world of difference

!http://i.zemanta.com/331821515_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/331821515_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Missouri summit thrusts home fire sprinklers into the spotlight

 

!http://a6.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0ef5e86970c-320wi|src=http://a6.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0ef5e86970c-320wi|alt=Illinois|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Illinois|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a0162ff1d4766970d01b8d0ef5e86970c img-responsive!Two recent Illinois house fires, which occurred in the same town during the same week, had starkly different outcomes. The fires occurred in Park Ridge, an affluent community of 40,000 residents in a compact, eight-square-mile area that is the childhood home of Hillary Rodham Clinton.


 

The morning of February 21, two fire sprinklers activated and rapidly extinguished a fire in a single-family home. Fire Marshal Kevin Plach reported that the sprinklers, designed in accordance with NFPA 13D, +Installation of Fire Sprinkler Systems in One- and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes,+ did its job of not only preventing flashover but also extinguishing the fire. In fact, the homeowner did not call Plach’s fire department until days later when his insurance company prodded him to get a fire report. This situation might become more common as fire sprinklers work their way into new homes. In this situation, the fire was extinguished and the valves shut down by the resident. Plach ensured the homeowner that the sprinklers were operational again after replacing two sprinkler heads.


 

Whether or not a sprinkler system is accurately placed back into operation is a concern following a successful fire sprinkler activation without fire department notification. The assurance of operable fire sprinklers following a fire needs to be another public education objective for fire departments. If the homeowner had reviewed the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition’s “Living with Sprinklers” materials, he would have known to call the fire department immediately. That’s why it’s important to educate homeowners on living in a sprinkler-protected home.


Most of the new homes in Park Ridge are teardown/rebuilds, and all of them built since 2001 have sprinklers. More than 1,000 homes and townhomes in the community now have this life-safety feature. The teardown-and-rebuild process is producing roughly 60 new homes a year.


Six days after the aforementioned sprinkler activation, firefighters responded to a call of smoke odor and found a fire that had a huge head start on them. According to Fire Chief Jeff Sorensen, there were no fire sprinklers in the home and it sustained more than $150,000 in damage. Moreover, it tied up crews from eight different fire departments for several hours.


The two house fires in Park Ridge were in complete contrast to each other. The sprinklered home freed up firefighters for other emergency or EMS calls. Conversely, the unprotected home required the workforce of eight fire departments. These two outcomes show the realities in both sprinklered and unsprinklered structures.  


 

This post was written by Tom Lia, executive director of the Northern Illinois Fire Sprinkler Advisory Board, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting legislation, raising public awareness, and educating code officials and government policymakers on home fire sprinklers. Lia regularly offers his perspective on sprinkler activities taking place in his state and elsewhere.


!http://i.zemanta.com/328706563_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/328706563_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!New infographic tells you how to make a compelling case for home fire sprinklers

!http://i.zemanta.com/329443164_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329443164_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Homebuilder arguments to new sprinkler bill countered by New Jersey fire service

!http://i.zemanta.com/329755113_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329755113_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor's harrowing experience highlighted in NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/329184882_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329184882_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Fire chief: Sprinklers would have prevented horrific fire that claimed a life

Certain New Jersey legislators made sure the memory of a massive fire in Edgewater that displaced 1,000 residents wouldn't be forgotten. They've kept their word.

 

Following the fire that made national headlines, Assemblyman John Wisniewski was hoping to brighten the spotlight placed on his state by reintroducing the New Home Fire Safety Act.The bill calls for the sprinklering of all new, one- and two-family homes. The Assembly approved the bill in February, and it recently passed the state's Senate with a 22-13 vote, per the Burlington County Times.

 

The article adds that the new rule would take effect seven months after becoming law. The bill now heads to Gov. Chris Christie's desk for his signature. Last legislative session, the same bill made its way through the Assembly and Senate, but the bill died after Christie failed to sign it into law.

 

Pro-sprinkler legislators are hoping for a different outcome based on recent events. &quot;The images of the https://community.nfpa.org/Edgewater fire raging and the building collapsing in on itself are haunting,&quot; Assemblyman Wisniewski stated in the opinion piece.

 

What's more haunting is to think what could have happened if everyone wasn't able to escape?

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08082932970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08082932970d-800wi|alt=Sprinkler trailer|title=Sprinkler trailer|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08082932970d image-full img-responsive!
Knowledge is power. 


 

That seemed to be the underlying tagline during the Missouri Sprinkler Summit, an inaugural event hosted by the Missouri Fire Sprinkler Coalition. Utilizing the brain power of some of America&#39;s sprinkler experts, the event gave residents of the Show Me State compelling viewpoints on the necessity of home fire sprinklers.&#0160;


 

Creating a localized forum for sprinkler edification has its benefits; the Oregon and Washington Fire Sprinkler Coalitions co-hosted a similar event last year, and the networking opportunities there led to an interesting sprinkler success story in Washington.


!http://a0.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b7c7641d68970b-320wi|src=http://a0.typepad.com/6a0162ff1d4766970d01b7c7641d68970b-320wi|alt=Rick Ennis|title=Rick Ennis|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a0162ff1d4766970d01b7c7641d68970b img-responsive!
Missouri Fire Sprinkler Coalition Chair Rick Ennis discusses firefighter safety and sprinklers at Missouri Sprinkler Summit


Aiming for similar successes, organizers for the Missouri event rounded up eager attendees and presenters, including: 


    • Fire Chief and Missouri Fire Sprinkler Coalition Chair Rick Ennis, who discussed how sprinklers are a crucial component of firefighter safety

Tom Lia, executive director of the Northern Illinois Fire Sprinkler Advisory board and one of North America&#39;s most revered sprinkler advocates

Peg Paul with the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition

Matt Klaus, NFPA&#39;s sprinkler expert who discussed crucial components of NFPA 13D, +Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes+


An eye-opening component of the event was a firsthand look at the Columbia, Missouri, Fire Department's live burn/sprinkler demonstration trailer. Congratulations to the coalition for hosting such a successful event. 


 

If you&#39;re looking for some additional inspiration from other sprinkler players throughout North America, head on over to the Fire Sprinkler Initiative site for presenter synopses from NFPA's regional sprinkler summits.


!http://i.zemanta.com/328568428_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/328568428_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Meet burn survivor Jeff Jordan, an important voice in the push for home fire sprinklers
!http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor's harrowing experience highlighted in NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter

South Carolina Fire Sprinkler Coalition
In 2014, South Carolina had the fifth highest number of fire deaths per capita in the nation, according to a recent TV report. Moreover, there have been 300 fire deaths in the state since 2007. Outraged by these figures, fire safety advocates in South Carolina aren't taking these statistics lying down. 

The South Carolina Fire Sprinkler Coalition recently positioned itself in front of TV cameras to promote a proven cure to their state's fire problem. First, they organized a live burn/sprinkler demonstration earlier this month, which got the attention of both the public and TV media. The demonstrations "are meant to show people the power of fire, but even a better and bigger power: the power of a residential sprinkler head," coalition member Diane Woods told a local Fox affiliate.

They didn't stop there. This week, advocates are manning a booth at the Carolina Classic Home and Garden Show in another attempt at spreading the sprinkler message to homebuyers and builders. Interviewed recently by a local CBS affiliate, coalition chair Jonathan Jones explained that installation costs have come down. "We're seeing installation costs in South Carolina as low as $1.03 a square foot in new construction, which is affordable. We'll save more lives through sprinkler systems than I will ever do in my [fire service] career."

Proving Jones' point on cost, keep your eyes peeled for an upcoming video case study produced by NFPA that documents a new, fully sprinklered development in South Carolina that inexpensively installed sprinklers in all of its homes.  

In the meantime, use the media to your advantage when promoting sprinklers. Utilize these talking points from NFPA.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c760fd42970b-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c760fd42970b-320wi|alt=Sprinkler protected family|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Sprinkler protected family|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c760fd42970b img-responsive!Writer Sheri Koones did her homework when researching the impact of home fire sprinklers. Nearly everything you ever wanted to know about these devices is captured in her recent story that appeared on AOL&#39;s Real Estate blog.


 



 



While not bogging down the reader with too many details, Koones highlights key points that should be shared with potential home buyers, code-making officials, and politicians. She cites:


Key NFPA data on home fires and sprinkler effectiveness

    1. Water wasted to douse a house fire with fire hoses vs. water saved by sprinklers

Free resources by the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition

&#0160;The cost-effectivenessof sprinklers


"Swayed by common misconceptions as well as perceived aesthetic issues, even safety-conscious homeowners sometimes steer away from sprinkler systems," writes Koones. "That's beginning to change, however, as more homeowners learn about the benefits of the systems and as less conspicuous sprinklers become available."


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c760fb94970b-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c760fb94970b-120wi|alt=Act-Now|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Act-Now|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c760fb94970b img-responsive!

Read the full post from Koones,
and please share the story with your peers, legislators, and anyone else that would benefit from this information.


 

 


 


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/330314260_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/330314260_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!When choosing a water supply for home fire sprinkers, which is best?
!http://i.zemanta.com/328706563_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/328706563_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!New infographic tells you how to make a compelling case for home fire sprinklers
!http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor's harrowing experience highlighted in NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter

Holyoke burn demonstration
Old Man Winter kept his firm grip on New England last week by dipping temperatures into the single digits during a legislative breakfast hosted by the Western Massachusetts Fire Chiefs Association in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Piercing the bitter chill, albeit briefly, was a fiery display that did what it was intended to do: get the attention of key politicians. 

Within minutes, the side-by-side burn demonstration--one structure equipped with sprinklers, one without--showcased to an array of state and local legislators that fire shows no mercy. (The temperature in the unsprinklered structure rapidly reached 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit.) What they also saw firsthand was the immense speed at which home fire sprinklers can react to fire's fury. 

This ability to prevent further tragedies in the places where most fire deaths in the U.S. are occurring is why sprinkler requirements for one- and two-family homes in Massachusetts are needed now, said Mary Regan, chair of the Massachusetts Fire Sprinkler Coalition and fire chief with the Westfield Fire Department. "Most people think they are safest in their home, but that is where you are at the greatest risk of being killed in a fire," said Regan in a story that appeared in The Republican. "Seven of the last 10 fire fatalities in Westfield have been in one- or two-family homes." Regan and the rest of the coalition are standing behind a new bill that would allow local communities to adopt sprinkler requirements for new, one- and two-family homes. 

The effects from these requirements were demonstrated firsthand in front of influential state politicians at the legislative breakfast. Said Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, "this demonstration illustrates how a picture is worth a hundred--no--a thousand words."

Act Now
Host your own live burn/sprinkler demonstration with free help from the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition. Also, watch effective demonstrations by visiting the Fire Sprinkler Initiative site.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c75e4c42970b-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c75e4c42970b-320wi|alt=Matt Klaus|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Matt Klaus|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c75e4c42970b img-responsive!While underscoring the benefits of home fire sprinklers, chances are you have been asked which water source is best for these systems. Tackling this question head-on, +NFPA Journal+ picked the brain of Matt Klaus, NFPA&#39;s principal fire protection engineer and staff liaison for its sprinkler standards, including NFPA 13D, +Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes.+&#0160;


 

What was Klaus&#39; pick? It turns out each optionmunicipal water supplies, tank/pump arrangement, and well waterhas its pros and cons. He advises designers and homeowners to consider weighing each option and decide which arrangement is best for them.


Regarding water storage tanks, Klaus says that most tanks supporting a 13D system can be 500 gallons or less; take up minimal space in a garage, basement, or utility space; and are "supported by small pumps to provide the needed flow and pressure." Moreover, states Klaus, tank/pump systems are incredibly cost-effective. 


 

Read what Klaus has to say about utilizing other water supplies (swimming pools? Really?) by reading his column in +NFPA Journal.+


!http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329743702_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor's harrowing experience highlighted in NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/328568428_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/328568428_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Meet burn survivor Jeff Jordan, an important voice in the push for home fire sprinklers

!http://i.zemanta.com/324013864_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/324013864_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Introducing Audrey Goldstein, the Fire Sprinkler Initiative's newest blogger

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0e466e3970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0e466e3970c-320wi|alt=Mayor Dennis Waldron|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Mayor Dennis Waldron|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0e466e3970c img-responsive!A requirement to sprinkler new homes in La Vergne, Tennessee, took effect last year. Since then, the town appointed a new mayor, Dennis Waldron, who recently voiced his opposition to the requirement.


 

According to a news story by a local ABC affiliate, Waldron cites freezing and flooding concerns, which NFPA has countered, while stating that this law will stunt housing growth in his community. The NFPA report, &quot;Comparative Analysis of Housing Cost and Supply Impacts of Sprinkler Ordinances at the Community Level",&#0160;proves that sprinkler requirements do not have detrimental effects on housing supply and costs.


 

This month, a new ordinance to nix the sprinkler law was up for a reading by the town&#39;s Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Per an article in +The Daily News Journal,+ Waldron mistakenly voted against &quot;approving the ordinance to change residential building codes in La Vergne,&quot; which in turn nixed the group&#39;s ability to end the sprinkler law.&#0160;


The mayor's response to his vote? "I had intended to vote (in favor of changing the building codes). I just had something else on my mind." 


 

For now, the requirement remains on the books. Waldron told The Daily News Journal that he&#39;s unsure if he will file new legislation to remove the sprinkler law.


La Vergne Fire Chief Rick McCormick still stands behind the sprinkler ordinance. "Anything that makes a difference or even a partial percentage of a difference when saving a life, that's what I'll always stand for," he told the paper.  


!http://i.zemanta.com/329183401_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329183401_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Fire chief: Sprinklers would have prevented horrific fire that claimed a life

!http://i.zemanta.com/329374571_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329374571_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA, Connecticut fire service, and array of safety advocates vocalize their support for new sprinkler bill at recent hearing

Sechelt Fire DepartmentThe outcome to a recent fire would have been vastly different had the residence been devoid of sprinklers, says Fire Chief Bill Higgs with the Sechelt Fire Department in British Columbia. His deduces that his department and three others would have responded to the blaze, with suppression efforts probably taking up half the day. Then there's the painstaking fire investigation, demolition, and rebuilding that might last months, maybe more. More traumatizing would have been any deaths or injuries at the scene.

Here's what actually occurred: sprinklers immediately activated following a grease fire in the kitchen. Upon the Sechelt Fire Department's arrival, the fire was completely extinguished. Only one sprinkler head had activated. 

There were no civilian or firefighter injuries. Only one tenant was replaced, while the others safely returned to their homes. The total loss to the $3 million structure was $5,000.

"This fire had the potential for catastrophic life and property losses," says Higgs. "We have witnessed the cost-saving benefits of automatic fire sprinklers in our town of just 12,000 people. We encourage others to learn from our experiences and to support our efforts in the promotion and continued use of residential fire sprinkler systems."

Looking to advocate for sprinklers in a similar fashion as the good folks at Sechelt? Utilize NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative materials.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fc0de3970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fc0de3970d-320wi|alt=CD player|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=CD player|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fc0de3970d img-responsive!For this blog post, we&#39;re going back to a time when boy bands ruled the radio and the Macarena was the quickest way to get the masses to the dance floor. Dust off those CDs and envelope yourself in flannel, because you&#39;re about to take a one-way trip to the 1990s!


 

You&#39;re probably wondering what pop music from this decade has to do with advocating for home fire sprinklers. Quite a lot, actually. Many of us sprinkler advocates have to give presentations at code council hearings, town meetings, and public events explaining why home fire sprinklers are lifesavers. (No, not the candy.) Public speaking doesn&#39;t come easy for some of us, which is why we&#39;re turning to some of the 90s best pop songs for some guidance on how to effectively get your point across to an audience.&#0160;


 

Without further ado, here are some tips from Brad Phillips,&#0160;Mr. Media Training and NFPA blog contributor. (The list originally appeared on his blog. ) Enjoy! &#0160;


 

Backstreet Boys, &quot;I Want it That Way&quot;&#0160;


Boy bands use the word “you” more than any other word. Perhaps the boys of ‘N Sync, 98 Degrees, and Hanson were onto something. By using the pronoun “you,” they directed their message straight into the hearts of their mostly younger, female fans. The word “you” has that power, and great speakers use it often to deliver their personal-sounding messages to each individual audience member. As an example, this Backstreet Boys classic uses the word “you” or “your” no fewer than 20 times—and “you” is the first word in the song.


 


 


 

Guns N’ Roses, “November Rain”&#0160;


 

As a general rule, it’s better to speak for too short than too long. But if a great movie can hold your attention for two-and-a-half hours, shouldn’t a great speaker be able to hold your attention for longer than the typical 50-minute conference breakout session? Guns N’ Roses pushed back against the typical constraints of pop radio, which restricts most songs to about four minutes. In 1992, their nine-minute hit “November Rain” made it to number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, becoming the “longest song in history to enter the top ten of that chart,” according to Wikipedia—and proving that longer&#0160;can&#0160;be better if the song—or speech—is good enough.


 


 


 

Spice Girls, “Wannabe”


 

The Spice Girls offer a formula for a successful call to action: “I’ll tell you what I want, what I really really want.” If your audience doesn’t understand the next steps they’re supposed to take after hearing you speak, they won’t take any. Some research suggests that asking for a small&#0160;and easily accomplished call to action is a good way to begin, since a small action often leads to bigger future actions.


 


 

<br />Extreme, “More Than Words”&#0160;


In their gorgeous ballad, Extreme pointed out that there is a difference between verbal communication and body language: “More than words / is all you have to do to make it real / then you wouldn’t have to say that you love me / ‘cause I’d already know.” As Extreme pointed out, words are only one way to deliver a message—and they’re often not enough on their own. To be truly effective, words need to be fully connected to the body language associated with them. In some cases, that means that your tone is as important—or even more important—than the words you choose. And great speakers have the ability to use their faces and bodies to communicate certain key points without any words at all.


 


 


 

Chumbawamba, “Tubthumping”


 

Despite your positive visualization, there’s still a chance you might bomb your presentation.&#0160;That’s where this song comes in: “I get knocked down / But I get up again / You’re never gonna keep me down.” With its pick-yourself-up-and-try-again lyrics, it’s a good reminder that most of us are going to deliver a dud once in a while. But your next audience won’t know that you didn’t succeed with your&#0160;last&#0160;audience, so it’s important not to bring that imperfect history into your new talk. Every presentation offers an opportunity to succeed anew—if&#0160;you don’t self-sabotage it with your negative self-talk.


 


 

Media professional Brad Phillips has worked closely with the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors to help its advocates spread messages on burn injury and prevention, including the importance of home fire sprinklers. He is the author of The Media Training Bible and the Mr. Media Training Blog.


!http://i.zemanta.com/326140795_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/326140795_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Registration now open for noteworthy sprinkler summit in Missouri

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fb696c970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fb696c970d-320wi|alt=Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fb696c970d img-responsive!Jeff Jordan is bringing to light the necessity of home fire sprinklers via a new video underscoring his story. Burned in his residence when he just weeks old, Jordan has gone through about 35 reconstructive surgeries--procedures that may not have been necessary, he says, if sprinklers had been present.&#0160;


 

The new edition of NFPA&#39;s Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter features Jordan&#39;s video and other important updates from the sprinkler arena. In the latest issue, you&#39;ll find stories on:


    • sprinkler bills filed in two states

    • the chair of America's newest sprinkler coalition getting vocal about sprinkler opposition

    • schooling future builders on sprinklers


 

..and more. Subscribe to the free newsletter today,&#0160;and we&#39;ll deliver the top sprinkler news from North America directly to your inbox once a month.&#0160;&#0160;


!http://i.zemanta.com/326140795_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/326140795_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Registration now open for noteworthy sprinkler summit in Missouri

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