Fred Durso

More and more fire service members making a point to mention fire sprinklers at scene of home fires

Blog Post created by Fred Durso Employee on Mar 23, 2016

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Rightfully so, smoke alarms typically get a mention at the scene of home fires. In front of news cameras and intrepid journalists, the fire official lets the public know whether or not these devices were present and operational. What's now occurring across North America are forward-thinking safety advocates also making a pitch for home fire sprinklers.

 

Take, for instance, a residential fire that occurred late last year in Millbury, Massachusetts. A 56-year-old disabled woman died in the blaze. Though not a one- or two-family home, the residence--like its smaller counterparts--would have benefited from fire sprinklers. The original plan of the building may have been reduced in size to avoid having sprinklers installed, Fire Chief Richard P. Hamilton told the Telegram and Gazette. "This [fire] really brings to light how sprinklers would have helped," he said. "Sprinklers would have saved a life."

 

In the Canadian city of Calgary, a fire marshal there has a similar mindset. Earlier this month, fire destroyed four homes there, prompting a promotion for home fire sprinklers. The end goal, he said, would be to better equip homes to fight and resist today's fires. "Eventually, the ultimate would be residential fire sprinklers," Calgary Chief Fire Marshal Ed Kujat told the local Metro newspaper. "If a fire started on the inside than a sprinkler would snuff out that fire locally. Hopefully that would result in lives and property being saved."

 

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c82776f1970b-120wi.jpgDownload this popular resource produced by the California Fire Sprinkler Coalition giving tips on how to promote home fire sprinklers to the media.

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