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Hello – Happy Friday!  Today’s topic comes to you from Val Ziavras, a Fire Protection Engineer at NFPA.  Special thanks to Val for her contribution to this blog and discussing one of the many subjects addressed in the Fire Code.

 

This week is Fire Prevention Week (FPW) and the campaign is “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere.” For those of you who aren’t familiar with FPW, check out the FPW webpage and last week’s Fire Code Friday for some additional information.  In honor of FPW, we are going to focus on home fire safety issues in the Fire Code again this week, more specifically the provisions for smoke alarms. 

 

The “Listen,” portion of the campaign is to remind people to listen for the sound of the smoke alarm.  Today, residences are filled with furnishings and contents made mostly of plastics and synthetic materials and responding quickly to the sound of the smoke alarm is more important than ever.  A resident may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds.  Flashover can happen much faster than it used to.  For a look at how much faster, check out this side by side comparison of modern room furnishings and 1970s room furnishings. 

Smoke Alarm

 

The smoke alarm requirements in the Fire Code are primary extracted from two source documents, NFPA 101 (The Life Safety Code) and NFPA 72 (The National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code).  NFPA 101 is going to regulate where smoke alarms are required while NFPA 72 is going to regulate how they are installed.  Section 13.7.2 of the Code addresses the occupancy specific requirements for fire alarm and smoke alarms. Typically, smoke alarms are required where we expect to find occupants sleeping.  For example, Section 13.7.2.13.1 of the Code requires smoke alarms or a smoke detection system in new and existing one- and two-family dwellings.  Section 13.7.2.13.1.1 requires that smoke alarms be installed in all sleeping rooms, outside of each separate sleeping area, in the immediate vicinity of the sleeping rooms, and on each level of the dwelling unit, including basements.  Other occupancies that also require smoke alarms in some capacity per NFPA 1 are day care homes, lodging or rooming houses, hotels and dormitories, apartment buildings, board and care facilities. (See Section 13.7.2 for the specific conditions for each occupancy.)

 

Section 13.7.1.8 of the Fire Code contains general installation criteria for smoke alarms including requirements for the interconnection of smoke alarms in new construction and more specific requirements for where smoke alarms should be installed.  Interconnecting smoke alarms is important because it helps ensure that occupants can hear the alarm even if doors are closed or if the smoke alarm that operates is on a different level. 

 

While the Life Safety Code will tell you what rooms/areas need smoke alarms, NFPA 72 provides additional guidance on installation criteria and identifies an area of exclusion.  The area of exclusion includes a 10 ft. radial distance from a stationary or fixed cooking appliance, think stoves.  Any smoke alarm installed between 10 ft. and 20 ft. from a stationary or fixed cooking appliance needs to be equipped with an alarm-silencing means or use photoelectric detection.  The Code does outline some exceptions for situations where a smoke alarm that uses photoelectric detection can be installed closer than 10 ft., but not less than 6 ft.  In addition to cooking appliances, the Code also specifies a minimum distance from a door to a bathroom containing a shower or tub.  Unless the smoke alarm is specifically listed for close proximity to such an area, a distance of at least 36 inches should be provided.  The Code specifically outlines an area of exclusion to minimize the chance of nuisance alarms.  By reducing the number of nuisance alarms, building occupants are less likely to remove or disable a smoke alarm that is there to protect them.

 

Fire inspectors play a critical role in educating the public about smoke alarms and their importance.  Whether through generic home inspections, public education efforts, or design and review work, those that enforce the Code can have a big impact on home fire safety.

 

With Fire Prevention Week drawing to a close, everyone can remember to take steps to better protect themselves and the public.  Test smoke alarms and make sure they are less than 10 years old.  Working smoke alarms will provide early notification of a fire.  Also, be sure to create a home fire escape plan!  Knowing two ways out of every room in the event of an emergency is important.

 

Thanks for reading, Happy Friday!

 

Please visit www.nfpa.org/1 to view the free access version of NFPA 1 2018 edition.  Follow along on Twitter for more updates and fire safety news @KristinB_NFPA.  Looking for an older #FireCodefriday blog?  You can view past posts here.

NFPA has issued the following errata on the 2018 edition of NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code; and on the Second Draft Report (Fall 2018) to NFPA 1600, Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity/Continuity of Operations Programs:
  • NFPA 99, Errata 99-18-2, referencing various sections in Chapters 5 and 15 of the 2018 edition, issued on September 13, 2018
  • NFPA 1600, Errata on Second Draft Report, referencing Figure A.1.2, issued on September 14, 2018 
An errata is a correction issued to an NFPA Standard, published in NFPA News, Codes Online, and included in any further distribution of the document.
This week, North American schools, communities, and fire departments are observing Fire Prevention Week (FPW). Since 1922, NFPA has sponsored the public observance of FPW. In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed FPW a national observance, making it the longest-running public health observance in our country. During this week, children, adults, and teachers learn how to stay safe in case of a fire. Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.
FPW is observed each year during the week of October 9 in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871. The incident killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,000 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.

For more information regarding this and other moments in fire history, please feel free to reach out to the NFPA Research Library & Archives. NFPA Archives houses all of NFPA's publications, both current and historic. Library staff are available to answer research questions from members and the general public.

 

For the 11th year in a row, NFPA teamed up with Domino’s to kick off our joint Fire Prevention Week program promoting the importance of smoke alarms and home fire safety. This year, nearly 50 first graders from a local elementary school were invited to the Flint Fire Department, where they learned about smoke alarms, as well as home escape planning and practice messages in support of this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, "Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere™.”  The students were also treated to a visit from Sparky the Fire Dog® and a pizza party.


A huge thanks to the Flint Fire Department for all their help and enthusiasm in support of this year’s program – it was our second year working with them, and they did a fabulous job helping make it a true success. Also, thank you to all the local Domino's and fire departments nationwide that team up each year to bring the campaign to life in their communities. Participation continues to grow each year, which is a testament to the program's fun, engaging approach to educating residents about smoke alarm safety. We truly appreciate everyone’s support!


Here's how Domino's Fire Prevention Week program works: Customers who place an order from participating Domino's stores during Fire Prevention Week, October 7-13, are randomly selected to receive their delivery from the local fire department, who will conduct a smoke alarm check in the customer's home. If the smoke alarms in the home are working, the delivery is free. If they're not working, the firefighters will replace the batteries or install fully-functioning alarms.

 

Flint Fire Department's Battalion Chief Steve Cobb talks with local news stations about the importance of teaching young children about fire safety.

The October 2018 issue of NFPA News, our free, monthly, codes-and-standards newsletter, is now available.
In this issue:
  • New project being explored on fire service personnel professional qualifications
  • Proposed Tentative Interim Amendments seeking comments on NFPA 59, NFPA 69, NFPA 221, NFPA 1971, and NFPA 5000
  • TIA issued on NFPA 72
  • Errata issued on NFPA 99 and NFPA 1600 Second Draft Report
  • Committees seeking members
  • Committees seeking public input and public comment
  • Committee meetings calendar   
Subscribe today! NFPA News is a free and includes special announcements, notification of public input and comment closing dates, requests for comments, notices on the availability of Standards Council minutes, and other important news about NFPA’s standards development process. 

In my recent NFPA Live session I discussed the new provision for automated inspection and testing that has been added to the 2017 edition on NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems. 
I received this follow-up question from a member. I hear this question a lot so I wanted to share it here. I hope you find some value in it.
NFPA Live is an interactive video series in which members of NFPA staff address some of the most frequent topics they receive through the Member's Only Technical Question service. If you are currently an NFPA Member you can view the entire video by following this link. If you're not currently a member, join today!
 

The First Draft Reports for NFPA Standards in the Fall 2019 revision cycle are available. Review the First Draft Reports for use as background in the submission of public comments.


To submit a public comment using the  submission system, go to the specific document information page by using the List of NFPA codes & standards or the links provided in the list below. Once on the document page, select the link "Submit a Public Comment" to begin the process. You will be asked to sign-in or create a free  account with NFPA before using this system. If you have any questions when using the system, a chat feature is available or contact us by email or phone at 1-800-344-3555.


The deadline to submit a public comment through the  system on any of these documents is November 15, 2018. Th proposed NFPA Standards with First Draft Reports in the Fall 2019 revision cycle are as follows:

 

  • NFPA 13E, Recommended Practice for Fire Department Operations in Properties Protected by Sprinkler and Standpipe Systems
  • NFPA 31, Standard for the Installation of Oil-Burning Equipment
  • NFPA 56, Standard for Fire and Explosion Prevention During Cleaning and Purging of Flammable Gas Piping Systems
  • NFPA 61, Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities
  • NFPA 75, Standard for the Fire Protection of Information Technology Equipment
  • NFPA 76, Standard for the Fire Protection of Telecommunications Facilities
  • NFPA 91, Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Particulate Solids
  • NFPA 115, Standard for Laser Fire Protection
  • NFPA 120, Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Coal Mines
  • NFPA 122, Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Metal/Nonmetal Mining and Metal Mineral Processing Facilities
  • NFPA 326, Standard for the Safeguarding of Tanks and Containers for Entry, Cleaning, or Repair
  • NFPA 329, Recommended Practice for Handling Releases of Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases
  • NFPA 410, Standard on Aircraft Maintenance
  • NFPA 600, Standard on Facility Fire Brigades
  • NFPA 601, Standard for Security Services in Fire Loss Prevention
  • NFPA 664, Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Explosions in Wood Processing and Woodworking Facilities
  • NFPA 730, Guide for Premises Security
  • NFPA 731, Standard for the Installation of Electronic Premises Security Systems
  • NFPA 804, Standard for Fire Protection for Advanced Light Water Reactor Electric Generating Plants
  • NFPA 805, Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Light Water Reactor Electric Generating Plants
  • NFPA 806, Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Electric Generating Plants Change Process
  • NFPA 853, Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fuel Cell Power Systems
  • NFPA 950, Standard for Data Development and Exchange for the Fire Service
  • NFPA 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications
  • NFPA 1051, Standard for Wildland Firefighting Personnel Professional Qualifications
  • NFPA 1071, Standard for Emergency Vehicle Technician Professional Qualifications
  • NFPA 1201, Standard for Providing Fire and Emergency Services to the Public
  • NFPA 1250, Recommended Practice in Fire and Emergency Service Organization Risk Management
  • NFPA 1405, Guide for Land-Based Fire Departments that Respond to Marine Vessel Fires
  • NFPA 1407, Standard for Training Fire Service Rapid Intervention Crews
  • NFPA 1408, Standard for Training Fire Service Personnel in the Operation, Care, Use, and Maintenance of Thermal Imagers
  • NFPA 1410, Standard on Training for Emergency Scene Operations
  • NFPA 1500, Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety, Health, and Wellness Program
  • NFPA 1521, Standard for Fire Department Safety Officer Professional Qualifications
  • NFPA 1561, Standard on Emergency Services Incident Management System and Command Safety
  • NFPA 1616, Standard on Mass Evacuation, Sheltering, and Re-entry Programs
  • NFPA 1620, Standard for Pre-Incident Planning
  • NFPA 1700, Guide for Structural Fire Fighting
  • NFPA 1931, Standard for Manufacturer's Design of Fire Department Ground Ladders
  • NFPA 1932, Standard on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire Department Ground Ladders
  • NFPA 1951, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Technical Rescue Incidents
  • NFPA 2010, Standard for Fixed Aerosol Fire-Extinguishing Systems

 

The First Draft Report for the following Standard was delayed and thus, has a revised public comment closing date of November 29, 2018:

 

  • NFPA 850, Recommended Practice for Fire Protection for Electric Generating Plants and High Voltage Direct Current Converter Stations
New equipment is added to a facility. Knowledge gained while working through an issue drives change in safety standards. Employees with different backgrounds and from different generations have dissimilar learning styles. Electrical safety is not a static field, it is more dynamic than often believed. How do you evaluate your electrical safety program? Training, procedures and practices involving electrical safety need to be periodically reviewed to not only stay current but to be effective. NFPA 70E®, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® contains many requirements which should be your starting point for auditing an electrical safety program (ESP).
The first place NFPA 70E requires an evaluation of an ESP is in 110.1(F). Controls are the company’s electrical safety metrics for determining if the ESP is effective and efficient. In order to evaluate a system, you need to know where you started and how far you have come. Metrics are measurable points to determine performance. They also can be used to determine if improvements to the safety program are required and, if so, what needs to be changed. There are two common metrics used to determine the effectiveness of something: lagging metrics and leading metrics. Lagging metrics provide a reactive view of a safety program. Leading metrics are used to identify and correct contributing factors before an incident occurs. A combination of these metrics can enhance a safe work program.
Next in NFPA 70E, 110.1(K) covers necessary audits. Auditing and enforcement is a critical part of any electrical safety program. It is vital that the electrical safety program — as well as the auditing and enforcement actions — be documented for the benefit of the employees and of the company. The process control points and actions (i.e., the items capable of being measured) need to be determined for there to be effective auditing. An audit of the overall ESP (110.1(K)(1)) is necessary to ensure that program principles and procedures are kept current with changing situations.
Section 110.1(K)(2) addresses field audits. This involves going into the field — wherever employees are performing their required tasks and there is the potential of exposure to electrical hazards — to gather information. It is important to watch employees perform their electrical safety related tasks and ensure that they are using PPE appropriate for the task to be performed. When it has been confirmed that the ESP principles or procedures are not being followed, corrective action must be taken. The field audit should be used to confirm that all electrical hazards are addressed, and to evaluate any program and physical conditions that have changed. 
Lockout/tagout programs and procedures require auditing in 110.1(K)(3). The objective of the audit is to make sure that all requirements of the procedure are properly detailed and that employees are familiar with their responsibilities. The audit should determine whether the requirements contained in the procedure are sufficient to ensure that the electrical energy is satisfactorily controlled. The audit must ensure that the lockout/tagout procedure is effective and is being properly implemented.
There are several other requirements for audits and supervision in NFPA 70E. Any audit should identify and correct deficiencies in the procedure, employee training, or enforcement. Corrective actions could consist of either modification of the training program or a revision to the procedures, such as increasing the frequency of training. Audits and metrics should measure program effectiveness as well as be used for developing program improvement. Audits should evaluate incidents to determine any necessary change to the ESP. An ESP should not be developed then placed on the shelf as a job well done. Electrical safety in the workplace is not the same as it was 10 years ago. How are you protecting employees with the best ESP possible?
For more information on 70E, read my entire 70E blog series on Xchange
Next time: Is there a way to increase electrical safety for workers in the future.
Please Note: Any comments, suggested text changes, or technical issues related to NFPA Standards posted or raised in this communication are not submissions to the NFPA standards development process and therefore will not be considered by the technical committee(s) responsible for NFPA Standards development. To learn how to participate in the NFPA standards development process and submit proposed text for consideration by the responsible technical committee(s), please go to www.nfpa.org/submitpi for instructions.

The following proposed Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) for the 2018 edition of NFPA 1971, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting, has been published for public review and comment:

 

Proposed TIA No. 1404, referencing 8.71.2.3


Anyone may submit a comment on this proposed TIA by the November 7, 2018, comment closing date. Along with your comment, please identify the number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

Hello – Happy Friday!  Today’s topic comes to you from Val Ziavras, a Fire Protection Engineer at NFPA.  Special thanks to Val for her contribution to this blog and discussing one of the many subjects addressed in the Fire Code.

 

With Fire Prevention Week (FPW) right around the corner, October 7-13, what better time than now to talk about home fire escape plans and means of escape requirements for dwelling units?  For those of you who aren’t familiar with FPW, the main goal is to educate the public on how to stay safe during a fire.  While many of us in the fire protection field, immediately check for sprinklers and look for a second way out when we enter a building, that isn’t always the case for the rest of world. One goal of FPW is to get people thinking about what they should do in the event of a fire.  It has been an NFPA sponsored event since 1922.  President Calvin Coolidge made FPW a national observance in 1925, making it the longest-running public health observance in the United States. 

 

This year the campaign is “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere.”  The “Learn” portion of the campaign is focused on encouraging everyone to learn two ways out of every room and making sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily and are free of clutter.  A great place to start is in your own home!  The best way to do it? Create a home fire escape plan.

 

So by now, you may be wondering what this has to do with the Fire Code, well ultimately NFPA 1 (and NFPA 101 as well as the building code) are going to regulate the number of means of egress, or in this case the number of means of escape.  Means of escape usually applies to dwelling units while means of egress applies to all other buildings.  A person’s means of escape is going to happen within their own dwelling unit (example: an apartment) but their means of egress is going to happen as soon as they leave the front door and enter the common hallway.  The concept behind both means of egress and means of escape is similar: they should provide a reliable and unobstructed way out.  However, the requirements for means of escape are not as stringent as for the means of egress.  Like many topics, NFPA 1 defers to a source document and extracts requirements. In this case, provisions are extracted directly from NFPA 101. 

 

Most houses have at least two doors, but what if a person were trapped in the bedroom and a fire was blocking the only door to that room? How would they escape? These are exactly the sort of questions we want to be asking ourselves, our families, and the people we work with and educate, when developing a home’s fire escape plan.

 

NFPA 1, Section 20.11.1 requires all new and existing one- and two-family dwellings comply not only with Section 20.11 but also NFPA 101, which requires every sleeping room and every living area in dwellings or dwelling units of two rooms or more have not less than one primary means of escape and one secondary means of escape.  The primary means of escape can be a door, stairway, or ramp providing a means of unobstructed travel to the outside of the dwelling unit at street or the finished ground level. The image below is taken from the Life Safety Code Handbook and shows a floor plan with the primary means of escape and secondary means of escape identified for every room. 

 


Section 24.2.2.3 of NFPA 101 outlines what can serve as a secondary means of escape.  The secondary means of escape could be:

  • Another door, stair, passageway, or hall that provides a way to get out that is independent of the primary means of escape
  • Passage through an adjacent non-lockable space that is independent of the primary means of escape
  • An outside window or door that meets certain size and operational requirements
  • A bulkhead meeting certain size requirements
  • Ladders or steps that meet certain requirements

In addition, NFPA 1 requires that, where approved on secondary means of escape, security bars, grates, grilles, or similar devices be equipped with approved release mechanisms that are releasable from the inside without the use of a tool, a key, special knowledge, or force greater than that which it takes for normal operation of the door or window. This ensures that the common practice of installing supplemental devices for the purpose of security do not impair the operation of a door or window for escape purposes.  This Section is important to the Fire Code and for fire inspectors performing inspections on multi-family units, hotel/dormitories, apartment buildings where this practice may be more common.  

 

As enforcers of the Code, it is important to enforce the provisions of the Code that will ensure a safe means of escape be provided during a fire or other emergency.  Part of enforcing this important Code topic also means using times like Fire Prevention week to educate people about making AND practicing a home fire escape plan, maintain their means of escape, and the overall importance of fire safety.  Be sure to check out next week’s blog which will feature another Fire Prevention Week theme and discuss requirements for testing smoke alarms.

 

Thanks for reading, Happy Friday!

 

Please visit www.nfpa.org/1 to view the free access version of NFPA 1 2018 edition.  Follow along on Twitter for more updates and fire safety news @KristinB_NFPA.  Looking for an older #FireCodefriday blog?  You can view past posts here.

The NFPA Standards Council is in receipt of a New Project Initiation Request for the development of an ANSI Accredited Standard to establish requirements for professional qualifications for fire service support personnel. Specifically, it is anticipated and requested that a standard be established to provide guidance on the professional qualifications for personnel engaged in functions that are in support of personnel and organizations assigned to firefighting, fire prevention and related services. The professional qualifications sought are not defined by other NFPA Professional Qualifications Standards. If this standard development is approved by the Standards Council, the standard may additionally address related topics as the Standards Council directs.
To assist the Standards Council in evaluating the proposal for new standards, NFPA is currently soliciting comments to gauge whether support exists for fire service support personnel professional qualifications standards development. NFPA specifically seeks input on the following:
  1. Are you, or your organization, in favor of the development of a new standard establishing professional qualifications for fire service support personnel, including job performance requirements for operating on or near emergency scenes (rehabilitation, water supply, staging, communications, command post support, logistics) and non-emergency operations (community risk reduction, post fire support and victim advocate)? 
  2. Please state your reason(s), providing detail, for supporting or opposing the proposed fire service support personnel professional qualification standards development.
All comments in support or opposition to standards development on fire service support personnel professional qualifications should be submitted electronically, online by October 19, 2018 at: stds_admin@nfpa.org .
Additionally, if you are interested in participating as a technical committee member should standards development be approved by the Standards Council, please submit an application online at: Submit online application*.
*Applications being accepted for purposes of documenting applicant interest in committee participation. Acceptance of applications by NFPA does not guarantee or imply the Standards Council will ultimately approve standards development activity on this proposed subject matter.

With Fire Prevention Week 2018 kicking off next week, it’s a good time to familiarize yourself with the theme and the critical safety messages behind it. This year’s theme, “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere™” stresses simple actions residents can take to be better prepared to react in the event of an emergency.

 

In her latest “Outreach” Column for the September/October NFPA Journal, NFPA Vice President of Advocacy and Outreach Lorraine Carli wrote about this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme and why being quick on your feet is more important than ever in today’s fast-moving fires.

 

Today, residents have as little as two to three minutes to escape a home fire, compared to about 10 minutes just a couple of decades ago,” she writes. “As a result, fires are even more dangerous. Statistics illustrate that if you experience a reported home fire today, you are more likely to die in it then you were in 1980.”

 

To learn more about the theme, the new NFPA mascot Simon, and the details behind “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware.” read the latest “Outreach” column in the new NFPA Journal.

 

Fire Prevention Week, an annual event that has been going strong for more than 90 years, runs October 7 through 13.

Fire Prevention Week stampNext week is Fire Prevention Week! Since 1922, the NFPA has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week.
 In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed Fire Prevention Week a national observance, making it the longest-running public health observance in our country. During Fire Prevention Week, children, adults, and teachers learn how to stay safe in case of a fire. Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.
Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. This horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.
For more information regarding this and other moments in fire history, please feel free to reach out to the NFPA Research Library & Archives.
The NFPA Archives houses all of NFPA's publications, both current and historic. Library staff are available to answer research questions from members and the general public.
In the following video, Russ Leavitt, executive chair of Telgian Corporation, highlights a major reorganization of the 2019 edition of NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems. He discusses how the new edition is more user-friendly than previous editions and other key changes: 
Leavitt's comments were recorded during NFPA's 2018 Conference & Expo. Did you know that conference attendees and NFPA members get full access to all the 2018 NFPA Conference & Expo education session audio and video files? If you're not currently an NFPA member, join today!
The following proposed Tentative Interim Amendments (TIAs) for NFPA 58, Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code; NFPA 59, Utility LP-Gas Plant Code; NFPA 69, Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems; NFPA 221, Standard for High Challenge Fire Walls, Fire Walls, and Fire Barrier Walls; and NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code®, are being published for public review and comment:
  • NFPA 58, proposed TIA No. 1387, referencing Equation 6.8.3.6.1b of the 2017 edition, closing date: 10/4/2018
  • NFPA 59, proposed TIA No. 1401, referencing Equations B.3b and B.3C of the 2018 edition, closing date: 10/11/2018
  • NFPA 69, proposed TIA No. 1402, referencing 3.3.X, 12.1.1.1(new), 12.2(8)(new), 12.2.8(new), A.12.1.1.1(new), A.12.2.8(new), A.12.2.8.2.2(new) of the proposed 2019 edition, closing date: 10/25/2018
  • NFPA 221, proposed TIA No. 1392, referencing 2.3.2, 3.3.14.2, 4.2.1, 4.4, 5.7.2, 5.13.1, 5.13.2, 6.8.3, A.5.13.2, and B.1.2.2 of the 2018 edition, closing date: 10/11/2018 
  • NFPA 5000, proposed TIA No. 1393, referencing 8.3.2.7.2, 8.3.2.13.1, 8.3.2.13.2, 8.3.3.9.3, A.8.3.2.13.2 of the 2018 edition, closing date: 10/11/2018 
  • NFPA 5000, proposed TIA No. 1394, referencing 2.3.7 and various sections of Chapter 5 of the 2018 edition, closing date: 10/11/2018 
  • NFPA 5000, proposed TIA No. 1395, referencing various sections in Chapters 3, 32, 35, 36, 38, 39, 41, and 44 of the 2018 edition, closing date: 10/11/2018 
  • NFPA 5000, proposed TIA No. 1396, referencing 35.3.1.3 and 35.14.4 of the 2018 edition, closing date: 10/11/2018 
Anyone may submit a comment on these proposed TIAs by the closing dates listed above. Along with your comment, please identify the number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

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