Fred Durso

A year after the tragic death of a college student, The Boston Globe examines glaring oversights in off-campus housing safety

Blog Post created by Fred Durso Employee on May 5, 2014

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87 Linden Street in Boston's Allston neighborhood, where a deadly fire claimed the life of a Boston University student in April 2013. (Photo: Fred Durso, Jr.)




Exactly how terrifying is a house fire for the occupants involved? A recent exposé in +The Boston Globe +answers that question in painstaking detail. The first installment in the Globe's three-part series on shortfalls in off-campus safety provides a harrowing account of a Boston house fire last year that injured firefighters and residents--many of them college students, some of them having to leap from windows to survive. 


 

Tragically, the fire also claimed the life of Binland Lee, a 22-year-old Boston University student weeks away from graduation.


 

Read more about the fire and its aftermath by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.</p>

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