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Greg Rogers
NFPA President James Shannon presents Home Fire Sprinkler Champion Award to Greg Rogers (pictured right) at NFPA's Bringing Safety Home Sprinkler Summit


Greg Rogers with the Washington Fire Sprinkler Coalition was this year's recipient of NFPA's Home Fire Sprinkler Champion Award. The accolade, presented this week at NFPA's Bringing Safety Home Sprinkler Summit in Denver, Colorado, honors sprinkler advocates for their tireless commitment to adoption efforts and advocacy.

Rogers has been a driving force behind sprinkler efforts in Washington. As president of the Washington State Association of Fire Marshals, he organized a massive contingent to attend the 2008 ICC Final Action Hearing for the vote to require sprinklers in new, one- and two-family homes. On the local level, Rogers advocated for sprinklers through an array of unique and effective tactics. After drumming up ample support across Washington, he and other advocates attended state hearing highlighting sprinklers. In the years since, he has continued to keep sprinklers at the forefront, organizing side-by-side burn demonstrations and attending a number of speaking engagements to garner additional sprinkler support.

Learn more about Rogers by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative website.

As president of the Washington State Association of Fire Marshals, he organized a massive contingent to attend the 2008 ICC Final Action Hearing for the vote to require sprinklers in new one- and two-family homes. On the local level, Rogers advocated for sprinklers using an array of unique and effective tactics. After drumming up ample support across Washington, he and other local advocates attended state hearings highlighting the importance of these systems. In the years since, he has continued to keep sprinklers at the forefront, organizing side-by-side burn demonstrations and attending a number of speaking engagements to garner additional sprinkler support. - See more at: http://www.firesprinklerinitiative.org/legislation/2014-summit/2014-home-fire-sprinkler-champion-award.aspx#sthash.vFBLw1Pf.dpuf
behind sprinkler-related efforts in Washington State. As president of the Washington State Association of Fire Marshals, he organized a massive contingent to attend the 2008 ICC Final Action Hearing for the vote to require sprinklers in new one- and two-family homes. On the local level, Rogers advocated for sprinklers using an array of unique and effective tactics. After drumming up ample support across Washington, he and other local advocates attended state hearings highlighting the importance of these systems. In the years since, he has continued to keep sprinklers at the forefront, organizing side-by-side burn demonstrations and attending a number of speaking engagements to garner additional sprinkler support. - See more at: http://www.firesprinklerinitiative.org/legislation/2014-summit/2014-home-fire-sprinkler-champion-award.aspx#sthash.vFBLw1Pf.dpuf

Outreach art for blogSince the 1970s, the number of fire deaths in homes has fallen from roughly 6,000 annually to its current level of just under 2,500. That’s the good news.

Less encouraging is the number of fire deaths we continue to see in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

That's the problem addressed by Lorraine Carli, vice-president of Advocacy and Outreach at NFPA, in "Cool Factor," the "Outreach" column in the new May/June issue of NFPA Journal. 

Among her solutions: increasing the number of working, listed smoke alarms in homes. "The sharp reduction in home fire deaths means that most people do not think they will suffer a home fire, much less lose a loved one to a fire," Carli writes. "But they still happen, and there are still too many people dying in home fires."

Haunted art for blog
On May 11, 1984, eight teenagers died in a fire at Six Flags Adventure Park in Jackson Township, New Jersey. The fire occurred in a popular attraction called the Haunted Castle, a series of darkened, winding passageways that contained a variety of displays—the rat lady, a hunchback, the spider room, and so on—designed to scare visitors. When the fire broke out, some visitors reportedly commented on how real the illusion seemed. The attraction was not sprinklered.

In the tangled aftermath of the fire, which included a court case that generated national headlines, a central question was whether sprinklers would have saved the lives of the teens who perished. In "Haunted by Fire," a feature story in the new May/June issue of NFPA Journal, writer Kathleen Robinson offers a fascinating look back at the conflicting answers that were provided to that question three decades ago, and introduces us to a new research project that attempts to answer the question definitively using state-of-the-art computing power and the latest in fire modeling. The researchers featured in the story will present their results at the upcoming NFPA Conference & Expo in Las Vegas.

mikehazell

Learning from LODD's

Posted by mikehazell Employee May 14, 2014

Check out this video series from the ATF...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poodle save
Everyone loves a firefighter rescue story that ends happily, and we especially love this one that involves rescuing a dog. Firefighters with the Indianapolis Fire Department responsed to an apartment fire a couple of days ago. Someone originally reported that somebody was trapped inside. As it turned out, everyone had escaped safely, however during the search effort, a firefighter came across a 6 year old poodle that was barely conscious. 

The poodle was brought outside where paramedics administered oxygen and fluids through an IV. Within twenty minutes, the dog was moving and taken to a nearby animal hospital. IFD said the Project Breathe Mask they used with this dog, has been used by IFD since 2010 when Invisible Fence donated one to each IFD apparatus. The specialized mask is designed to specifically fit the snout of an animal.

We are glad this story has a happy ending thanks to the first responders on the scene! 

Time and again, real-life news stories show us that working smoke alarms alert people to fire in time to safely escape. But when people have a home fire escape plan in place, the ability to use that time wisely is maximized.

That was the case for a family in Hampshire, England, who experienced a fire in their home on Monday. According to a local news report, the family had working smoke alarms, a pre-planned escape route and closed all of their doors as part of their bedtime routine.

A local fire official credited the family “for being prepared for a fire in their home which may have saved their lives.”

To learn more about smoke alarms and creating a home fire escape plan, read NFPA's smoke alarm safety tips and our home escape planning section.

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