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2014

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0b41c58970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0b41c58970c-320wi|alt=December Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=December Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0b41c58970c img-responsive!Maryland's fire service remains "cautiously optimistic" after experiencing a decline in fire deaths in 2014. Complementing this good news is that there hasn't been a single fire death in any of Maryland's sprinklered homes. 


 

Learn more by reading the December issue of NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter. Other highlights from the issue include:


    • Homebuilder learns the facts behind the popular myth that “sprinklers are too costly”

    • New video highlights growing movement in support of home fire sprinklers

    • NFPA blogger initiates discussion on whether or not the fire service has fully embraced home fire sprinklers


 

Not getting the free, monthly newsletter delivered directly to your inbox? Sign up today to stay on top of sprinkler news from across North America.


!http://i.zemanta.com/317924240_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/317924240_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Deadly blaze underscores Connecticut's home fire problem and growing group of safety advocates working towards a solution
!http://i.zemanta.com/319084048_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/319084048_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Fire chief: Homebuilders "misinformed" about home fire sprinklers
!http://i.zemanta.com/314530758_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/314530758_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!How far has the fire service come in embracing life safety initiative dedicated to home fire sprinklers?

12311986
On December 31, 1986, a mid-afternoon fire at the Dupont Plaza Hotel and Casino in San Juan, Puerto Rico resulted in 97 fatalities and over 140 injuries.  The NFPA analysis of the data indicates there were four major factors contributing to the loss of life.  Those factors are:

   •     Lack of automatic sprinklers in the south ballroom (room of origin).

   •     Rapid fire growth and spread.

   •     Lack of automatic fire detection systems/ inadequate exits for the casino.

   •     Vertical opening between the ballroom and the casino levels.

 Additional findings are:

   •    Smoke movement to the high-rise tower by way of vertical penetrations.

   •     Hotel tower occupants were not aware of a severe fire.

For the full NFPA Fire Investigation report.

Geospatial
Over the past decades, a series of devastating wildland fires have burned millions acres of forests, grasslands, and wildland-Urban Interface (WUI), causing inestimable environmental loss and unfavorable injuries and fatalities of firefighters. The successful application and popularization of geospatial technology in planning and responding to emergency events has gained great interest from the wildland and WUI fire management community. 

Geospatial technology includes systems such as Geographic Information System (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS), and Global Positioning System (GPS). This study focuses on identifying, evaluating, and analyzing current geospatial technological applications used to address wildland and WUI fire events, with a focus on presenting the characteristics of each technology for wildland and WUI fires of different scale and magnitude. 

The goal of this project is to compile a collection of the latest geospatial technological approaches to clarify the methodology, application and utility of various geospatial techniques and data for wildland and WUI fire events. This report is intended to improve understanding and enhance decision-making for fire preparedness, mitigation, and rehabilitation in the wildland and WUI. The deliverables of this project collectively review the available baseline information, and identify the fundamental principles and key details involving current applications of geospatial technology to address wildland and WUI fire hazards. They provide a summary of core information regarding the features and specific use of different geospatial tools, with a primary focus on Graphic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS), and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies.

Download the complete report, free of charge, from the Fire Protection Research Foundation website

 

The gifts have been opened, the ornaments are starting to sag, and the fallen pine needles are multiplying daily – these are clear signs that it’s time to remove the Christmas tree and other holiday decorations from your home.

Christmas trees are flammable objects. The longer they’re in your home, the more they dry out, making them a significant fire hazard.

Nearly 40 percent of home fires that begin with Christmas trees occur in January. Although these fires aren’t common, when they do occur, they’re more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death, as compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires.

While many people choose to keep their Christmas trees and holiday decorations up for a few weeks after the holidays, the continued use of seasonal lighting and dried-out trees presents increased fire risks.

For recommendations on safely disposing of your Christmas tree, along with tips for safely putting away holiday decorations, visit “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires”, NFPA’s campaign with the United States Fire Administration (USFA).

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07ce1276970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07ce1276970d-800wi|alt=House fires|title=House fires|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07ce1276970d image-full img-responsive!
The number of fire fatalities in Alabama this year has exceeded 2013 totals,
and the state's fire officials aren't taking the news lightly. Joining others in vocalizing their frustration with these deaths is Chief Alan Martin with the Tuscaloosa Fire and Rescue Service. In a recent op-ed published in +The Anniston Star,+ he counters comments made by a staffer from the Home Builders Association of Alabama, who labeled home fire sprinklers as "property protectors" with minimal life-saving advantages.


"The life-safety benefits of residential sprinklers are undisputed," states Martin. "While they do eliminate hundreds of millions of dollars in property loss, the primary purpose is to save lives."


 

Learn more by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.


!http://i.zemanta.com/315810934_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/315810934_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Homebuilder gets schooled on home sprinkler costs in a town requiring installation

!http://i.zemanta.com/317924240_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/317924240_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Deadly blaze underscores Connecticut's home fire problem and growing group of safety advocates working towards a solution

TreesThe gifts have been opened, the ornaments are starting to sag, and the fallen pine needles are multiplying daily – these are clear signs that it’s time to remove the Christmas tree and other holiday decorations from your home. 

Christmas trees are flammable objects. The longer they’re in your home, the more they dry out, making them a significant fire hazard. NFPA statistics show that nearly 40 percent of home fires that begin with Christmas trees occur in January. Although these fires aren’t common, when they do occur, they’re more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death, as compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires. 

While many people choose to keep their Christmas trees and holiday decorations up for a few weeks after the holidays, the continued use of seasonal lighting and dried-out trees after the holidays presents increased fire risks. When people do dispose of their trees, NFPA recommends using the local community’s recycling program, if available. They should not be put in the garage or left outside.  

In addition, NFPA offers these tips and recommendations for safely removing electrical lights and decorations from Christmas trees, and ensuring that they’re in good condition for the following year: 

  • When unplugging electrical decorations, use the gripping area on the plugs. Never pull the cord to unplug a device from an electrical outlet. (Doing so can harm the cord’s wire and insulation, which can lead to an electrical fire or shock.) 
  • As you put away electrical light strings, take time to inspect each for damage. Throw out light sets if they have loose connections, broken sockets, or cracked or bare wires.  
  • Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags, or wrap the lights around a piece of cardboard. 
  • Store electrical decorations away from children and pets, and put them in a dry place where they won’t be damaged by water or dampness.

For additional resources and information for a fire-safe winter season, visit “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires” , NFPA’s campaign with theUnited States Fire Administration (USFA).  

Many NFPA codes and standards, in particular NFPA 400, Hazardous Materials Code, specify separation/clearance distances for hazardous chemical storage and processes from other equipment and occupied buildings. Many of these requirements have historical undocumented origins. Guidance, which may inform a sound technical basis for adjusting these distances, has been requested by NFPA Technical Committees. There are a number of methodologies in the literature, both risk and hazard based, which are used in the chemical safety process safety field that may be relevant to the calculation of these distances.

ResearchThe purpose of this project is to provide guidance to NFPA technical committees on methodologies to develop technically based separation/clearance distances for hazardous chemical storage/processes and their application to the chemical storage and processes. The specific focus of the project is those hazards within the scope of NFPA 400. The literature review of separation distances is included in the report along with a verification case study using Ammonium Nitrate solids. 

Download and read the full report, free of charge, from the Fire Protection Research Foundation website

mikehazell

SupDet 2015

Posted by mikehazell Employee Dec 29, 2014

Registration is now open for the Foundation's 2015 Suppression, Detection, and Signaling Research and Applications Symposium (SupDet), which will be held March 3-6, 2015 at the Wyndham Orlando Resort International Drive in Orlando, Florida.  SupDet 2015 will feature over 30 presentations including:

  • Latest in detection and signaling research including detection of cooking fires, carbon monoxide detection, development of test methods for nuisance resistance for detectors and alarms, and detection applications including nuclear power plants.
  • Latest in suppression research including storage protection applications, dry sprinkler systems, lithium ion protection, hybrid suppression systems, and special applications including heavy duty vehicles.

For the full program, please visit the Foundation's website.

There will also be a free-half day workshop on "Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance (ITM) of Fire Protection Systems: Improving the Effectiveness of Systems" open to all attendees on Wednesday, March 4th.  

REGISTER TODAY for the full symposium, or choose either the Detection Program or the Suppression Program. All registration options entitle you to attend the workshop on Wednesday, March 4.

Sponsorship options are also available - please contact Amanda Kimball at the Foundation (akimball@nfpa.org) if you are interested.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07ce1276970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07ce1276970d-800wi|alt=House fires|title=House fires|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07ce1276970d image-full img-responsive!
The number of fire fatalities in Alabama this year has exceeded 2013 totals,
and the state's fire officials aren't taking the news lightly. Joining others in vocalizing their frustration with these deaths is Chief Alan Martin with the Tuscaloosa Fire and Rescue Service. In a recent op-ed published in +The Anniston Star,+ he counters comments made by a staffer from the Home Builders Association of Alabama, who labeled home fire sprinklers as "property protectors" with minimal life-saving advantages.


"The life-safety benefits of residential sprinklers are undisputed," states Martin. "While they do eliminate hundreds of millions of dollars in property loss, the primary purpose is to save lives."


 

Learn more by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.


!http://i.zemanta.com/315810934_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/315810934_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Homebuilder gets schooled on home sprinkler costs in a town requiring installation

!http://i.zemanta.com/317924240_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/317924240_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Deadly blaze underscores Connecticut's home fire problem and growing group of safety advocates working towards a solution


The Foundation has just published a report on this subject which we hope will be of value to a range of NFPA Technical Committees involved in developing spatial separation requirements for hazard protection. It reviews both risk and hazard based approaches to this topic and provides guidance on selection of appropriate methods for different types of hazards.Separation Distances and NFPA Codes and Standards

NFPA News The December special edition of NFPA News, our codes and standards newsletter, is now available.

In this issue:

  • NFPA goes completely digital for online submissions of public input and comments
  • NFPA seeking comments on a proposed TIA on NFPA 1999 to help protect first responders from Ebola virus
  • Committees soliciting public input
  • Committees seeking members
  • Committee meetings calendar

Subscribe today! NFPA News is a free newsletter, and includes special announcements, notification of public input and comment closing dates, requests for comments, notices on the availability of Standards Council minutes, and other important news about NFPA’s standards development process.

The Fire Protection Research Foundation recently published the report “Disaster Resiliency and NFPA Codes and Standards” authored by Kenneth W. Duncan, P.E., Performance Design Technologies. The purpose of this project is to identify those provisions in NFPA codes and standards that embody the concepts of resiliency and compile available information to serve as a technical reference for those documents, identifying key gaps in knowledge. The report includes a literature review, codes and standards mapping and gap assessment.  Resiliency report

The literature review provides relevant extracts from a variety of sources and is intended to include a pathway for understanding how the concepts of resilience could apply to the wide range of NFPA codes and standards. The mapping is intended to be both a benchmarking of the current codes and standards and an identification of a path forward for incorporating resilience concepts. The gap assessment is intended to identify knowledge gaps or other barriers to implementation.

Definitions of Resilience

The common themes from the many definitions of resilience can be summarized for their use in characterizing the role of NFPA codes and standards as follows:

1) Resilience includes technical, organizational, social and economic dimensions.

2) Resilience requires actions described as planning, preparing, preventing, protecting, mitigating and responding.

3) Resilience requires preparation and response to be adaptive.

4) Resilience should focus on minimizing damage and disruption to public health and safety, the economy, environment, and national security.

Specific to design standards activities, a fifth theme can be added regarding continuity of functionality:

5) Resilience includes the ability of structures and systems to withstand these external events, whether natural or human-created.

The Fire Protection Research Foundation will be conducting additional work including the development of a Guidance document on incorporating resiliency into NFPA Codes and Standards.

kategreene

NFPA 2015 Training Schedule

Posted by kategreene Employee Dec 23, 2014

Be prepared. Be proactive. Plan your training for the upcoming year with NFPA's 2015 Winter Training Catalog. See details online or download a PDF of NFPA's 2015 Winter Training Catalog for quick reference to all of the courses scheduled for 2015. Plus preview Self-Guided courses based on the 2015 Editions of NFPA 70E®, NFPA 101®, and NFPA 99! Earn CEUs and train with the code experts from NFPA.

 Download NFPA's 2015 Winter - Fire Protection Training Catalog

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Download NFPA's 2015 Winter - Electrical Safety Training_Catalog

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2015 LOCATIONS

FEBRUARY ... New Orleans, LA ... Houston, TX 

MARCH ... Quincy, MA ... Baltimore, MD ... Las Vegas, NV

APRIL  ... Quincy, MA  ... Atlanta, GA ... Phoenix, AZ ... Chicago, IL

MAY  ... Quincy, MA ... San Diego, CA ... Nashville, TN

JUNE  ... Fort Lauderdale, FL ... Hasbrouck Heights, NJ

JULY  ... Williamsburg, VA ... San Francisco, CA

SEPTEMBER  ... Charlotte, NC  ...Quincy, MA ... Northbrook, IL ... Indianapolis, IN

OCTOBER  ... St. Louis, MO ... Denver, CO ... Dallas, TX

NOVEMBER  ... Quincy, MA ... Durham, NC ... Bellevue, WA

DECEMBER  ... Anaheim, CA ... Orlando, FL

The Fire Protection Research Foundation recently published the report “Disaster Resiliency and NFPA Codes and Stardards” authored by Kenneth W. Duncan, P.E., Performance Design Technologies. The purpose of this project is to identify those provisions in NFPA codes and standards that embody the concepts of resiliency and compile available information to serve as a technical reference for those documents, identifying key gaps in knowledge. The report includes a literature review, codes and standards mapping and gap assessment.  Resiliency report

The literature review provides relevant extracts from a variety of sources and is intended to include a pathway for understanding how the concepts of resilience could apply to the wide range of NFPA codes and standards. The mapping is intended to be both a benchmarking of the current codes and standards and an identification of a path forward for incorporating resilience concepts. The gap assessment is intended to identify knowledge gaps or other barriers to implementation.

Definitions of Resilience

The common themes from the many definitions of resilience can be summarized for their use in characterizing the role of NFPA codes and standards as follows:

1) Resilience includes technical, organizational, social and economic dimensions.

2) Resilience requires actions described as planning, preparing, preventing, protecting, mitigating and responding.

3) Resilience requires preparation and response to be adaptive.

4) Resilience should focus on minimizing damage and disruption to public health and safety, the economy, environment, and national security.

Specific to design standards activities, a fifth theme can be added regarding continuity of functionality:

5) Resilience includes the ability of structures and systems to withstand these external events, whether natural or human-created.

The Fire Protection Research Foundation will be conducting additional work including the development of a Guidance document on incorporating resiliency into NFPA Codes and Standards.

No, this isn't NFPA staff
Sick and tired of singing or hearing "Jingle Bells" for the umpteenth time this year? Don't fret: the ingenious minds at NFPA have placed its stamp on the holiday classic. For those looking to add something new to the family's holiday singalong, or if you're simply looking to impress Aunt Edna, try the following song on for size. 

Sung in the same fashion as "Jingle Bells," NFPA's version, "Sprinkler Save," adds a little levity to a proven, life-saving device. And for those wondering: "Who the heck is Dude the Cat?" Read this. 

Kudos to NFPA's Marty Ahrens for crafting the lyrics.

 

Dinner’s on the stove

Fried chicken on its way

Kids get in a row;

It’s just another day

I go back around

To break up their darn fight

When the smoke alarm starts to sound

The flaming pan’s a sight.

 

Oh, sprinklers save, sprinklers save

Sprinklers save the day

Sprinklers keep the fire small

While help is on the way, Hey!

Sprinklers save, sprinklers save

Sprinklers save the day

Sprinklers keep the fire small

While help is on the way.

 

Apartment fire call

Smoke and screams inside

Firefighters kick in door

Search for those who cried 

Couch had been on fire

Sprinkler on it rained

Dude the cat was good and mad

But the fire was contained.

 

Oh, sprinklers save, sprinklers save

Sprinklers save the day

Sprinklers keep the fire small

While help is on the way, Hey!

Sprinklers save, sprinklers save

Sprinklers save the day

Sprinklers keep the fire small

While help is on the way!

 

Happy Holidays from NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative team! Here's to a safer 2015! 

Iphone photos 12-2014 272

The 2014 Motorsports Engineering Conference was held this past December 9 and 10 in Indianapolis, Indiana, and was sponsored by the University of Indiana Purdue and the Center for Advanced Product Evaluation (CAPE). This conference was held in conjunction with the Performance Racing Industry Trade Show, one of the largest racing industry trade shows in the country. These two events bring together racing industry personnel from around the world to see the latest innovations, network, and discuss the most recent challenges faced by the Motorsports community and has a correlation to the NFPA 610 document, Guide for Emergency and Safety Operations at Motorsports Venues.

At the engineering conference several topics where presented such as; driver safety review, manufacture and performance of the FIA8860 Super Helmet, helmet performance comparisons, cockpit Surround Foam evaluation testing, and evaluation of enhanced roll over protection. The roll over protection evaluation included an actual "live" test held at the CAPE facility.

Iphone photos 12-2014 189

Iphone photos 12-2014 192

 

This test was designed to replicate the race car having rolled onto its side from a primary crash then striking the track wall at the top of the roll cage in a resultant secondary crash. This was to determine if the design of the race car roll cage prevented a head strike of the driver. The impact of the crash was measured at 40,000 lbf. and was determined by high speed video that the driver's head did strike the pad with lethal force.

NFPA 610 Guide for Emergency and Safety Operations at Motorsports Venues 2009 edition covers planning, training, personnel, equipment, and facilities as they relate to emergency and safety operations at motorsports venues. To view NFPA 610 go to http://www.nfpa.org/610

EbolaTo help protect emergency first responders from exposure to the Ebola virus, NFPA is seeking comments to a Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) to NFPA 1999: Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations. The TIA proposes a revision to the design and performance criteria of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to address the risk of exposure to the Ebola virus threat.

NFPA has posted the TIA on NFPA 1999 for public review and comment. To submit a comment, please e-mail the Secretary, Standards Council, by January 152015 at TIAs_Errata_FIs@nfpa.org.

The TIA follows work conducted by several organizations and federal agencies that recognized the need for a national PPE standard to protect emergency first responders against the Ebola Virus and other liquid-borne pathogens. The organizations include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization, the Human and Health Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and Interagency Board for Equipment Standardization and Interoperability.

Thank you for your time, consideration and input!

At its August 2014 meeting, the NFPA Standards Council reviewed the scope and title for a new committee on Facilities for Fire Training and Associated Props. After review of all the material before it, the Council voted to publish a notice to solicit public comments for the need of the project, information on subject matter resources, those interested in participating, if established, and other organizations actively involved with the subject.

The deadline for comments is February 15, 2015. See the full post written by NFPA's Steven Sawyer.

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The percentage of fatal fire victims 65 and older has been increasing while the percentage of victims under 5 has fallen.



 

by NFPA's Marty Ahrens



According to NFPA’s new report, +Characteristics of Home Fire Victims+, older adults had the highest risk of fire death in the US compared to other age groups. In 2007-2011, people 65 and over were 2.4 times as likely to be killed in a home fire as the overall population. While children under five have historically also been a high risk group, their risk has dropped to 1.1 times that of the general population. The percentage of fatal home fire victims under five years of age fell from 18% in 1980 to 6% in 2011, while the percentage of victims 65 or older increased from 19% to 31% over the same period*. *The risk of home fire injury varies less with age than the risk of fire death.   


While the majority of home fire victims were white, African Americans, relative to their share of the population, were roughly twice as likely to be fatally injured in a home fire in 2007-2011 as the overall population.  The Hispanic home fire death rate was half that of the overall population. The difference was even greater for children and older adults.


African-American children under five had a home fire death rate of 23.0 deaths per million population, four times the 5.5 rate seen for white children and three times the 7.4 rate for Hispanic children and more than the same age. 


For African-American 65 and over, the rate was 56.3 deaths per million population, three times the 17.7 rate for white older adults and almost five times the 12.3 death rate experienced by older Hispanics. 


While great progress has been made, these statistics show that there is still a lot of work to be done to improve fire safety for ALL of our people.  Read the full report to learn more.

 

ChimneyThe main function of a chimney structure is “draft” through which, flue gases and smoke are removed from the building. Several parameters influence draft including the chimney height and the temperature differences between the outside air and combusted gases inside the flue. Flow resistance decreases the induced draft. Moreover, additional turns and sharper parts in a chimney also influence the process and often maximize the flow resistance and minimize the draft in the system. Furthermore, rain caps and other terminals increase flow resistance depending on the terminals’ materials, geometries, and size. Proper design of a venting system requires information and specific data that address flue gas flow through the venting system, especially in solid fuel appliances. Such information and pertinent data can be obtained from published materials describing modeling and reported testing of the entire venting system (including test results published by manufacturers on their products).  

"Impact of Chimney-top Appurtenances on Flue Gas Flow" was authored by Pegah Farshadmanesh, Mehdi Modares and Jamshid Mohammadi with the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology.  This report summarizes findings of a comprehensive search of available published papers on chimney-top device flow resistance including reported testing and modeling, fire accident investigations, and other related studies. The gap in the needed knowledge is determined in an effort to provide insight into what is needed for development of guidance for installing rain caps and other chimney-top devices with technical substantiation.

Download the complete report, free of charge, from the Foundation website

NFPA 1999, 2013 editionNFPA is seeking public review and comment on a proposed Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) on NFPA 1999, Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations, 2013 edition.  This TIA proposes to revise design and performance criteria of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and address the risk of exposure to the Ebola virus threat. 

The TIA follows work conducted by several organizations and federal agencies that recognized the need for a national PPE standard to protect emergency first responders against the Ebola Virus and other liquid-borne pathogens. The organizations include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization, the Human and Health Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and Interagency Board for Equipment Standardization and Interoperability.

This TIA can be reviewed on the Current & Prior Editions tab of the NFPA 1999 Document Information Page.

Anyone may submit a comment on this proposed TIA by the January 15, 2015 closing date. Along with your comment, please identify the number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

Mayor Lawrence JacksonThe Village of Riverdale, Illinois, recently became one of nearly 100 fire-safe communities in Illinois where fire sprinklers are required in new, single-family homes. Along with Blue Island, which passed a home fire sprinkler requirement in 2012, Riverdale is among the first communities in Chicago’s inner ring of southern suburbs to recognize the importance of protecting residents in their homes.

Mayor Lawrence Jackson is dedicated to the safety of the people he serves and trusts the expertise of the code development process and fire officials. “Having updated codes protects the residents, and up-to-date code enforcement is one of the priorities of my administration in order to maintain a safe community,” states Jackson.

Upon Jackson taking office in 2013, he was approached by Fire Chief Robert Scharnhorst about adopting a home fire sprinkler requirement. Although he was not familiar with home fire sprinklers at the time, Jackson got educated on the subject by Scharnhorst during the village board’s building code renewal process. Learn what happened next by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.

ChuckWe want to welcome two new members of our senior leadership team here at NFPA! Charles (Chuck) Stravin is now our vice president of business operations, with overall responsibility for developing the strategic vision and operations to serve customers. Julie Lynch is our new vice president of human resources (HR) and will develop and align HR strategy, programs and policies to support NFPA’s overall strategy and evolving culture and goals.

JulieChuck will oversee a product and service strategy that delivers solutions to NFPA’s diverse customers in fire, electrical and building safety. His leadership responsibilities include product development, marketing and advertising, training and certification, sales and order fulfillment. Chuck joins us from Mesa Home Products where he served as president and CEO.

In her role, Julie is responsible for HR strategy development and implementation, talent management, employee engagement and organizational development. She joins us from International Data Group (IDG) and IDG Research Workforce Efficacy Solutions where she held numerous HR leadership positions.

Welcome to both new members of our team, we are happy to have you on board!

Safety sourceThe December issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education enewsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find;  

  • Put a Freeze on Winter Fires and Project Holiday
  • Fire-safety materials for the family
  • NFPA recruiting for three public education positions
  • Children's videos highlight wildfire safety
  • Blog on microwave safety

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division, activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog® and more.

Trouble_in_mind_hedBehavioral health is a subject not often talked about in the fire service, but it affects every department and emergency responder in some way or other. The NVFC, through its Share the Load™ Support Program, has developed a series of resources to help educate and train first responders about the importance of behavioral health and provide resources, tips, and tools to help departments, first responders, and families address these issues.

You might remember, not too long ago when carbon monoxide devices first came into existence, that they would activate on high concentration of CO. They would also activate once a series of low concentrations over a long period of time had finally reached a threshold for activation. In either event we would respond, determine which appliance caused the CO alarm to activate, and then have the home owner take the CO device outside to fresh air clear the unit and bring it back inside.

This may be one analogy and perhaps a poor one at best, but if you look at the effect of stressful or traumatic events on a fire fighter the cumulative effects will cause the fire fighter to signal a response, similar to that of a CO alarm activation. It may be that all that is needed is to reset--seek a cleaner environment much the same way we reset a CO device and put it back in service.  

There will be times when a fire fighter will come to the end and it will be too late. It may be only one incident or a series of events. Indicators may be related to physical and mental reactions that are not typical to that individual. Some indicators will be short term and others will be long in duration. For any of us it could be detrimental causing health issues and/or suicide.

The National Volunteers Firefighters Council has established links to their behavioral health resources, including a link for the Share the Load initiative.  Please take the opportunity to review the website and become aware of the factors and how you might save a fire fighter’s life.

-Tom McGowan  

Dec Fire BreakThe December issue of Fire Break, NFPA’s Wildland Fire Operations Division newsletter, is now available for viewing. Here’s what you’ll find in this month’s issue:

  • A link to NFPA’s “Large Loss Fires in the United States in 2013” report that highlights Colorado’s Black Forest Fire that resulted in $420.5 million in damage, the highest in terms of direct property loss of any fire in the country.
  • Information about the newest members of the Wildland Fire Operations Division
  • Some interesting statistics about lightning and its connection to wildfires
  • A link to our new Sparky wildfire videos
  • Resources to help prepare seasonal properties for the spring fire season …

...and much more. We want to continue to share all of this great information with you so don’t miss an issue! So subscribe today. It’s free! Just click here to add your e-mail address to our newsletter list.

ChimneyThe main function of a chimney structure is “draft” through which, flue gases and smoke are removed from the building. Several parameters influence draft including the chimney height and the temperature differences between the outside air and combusted gases inside the flue. Flow resistance decreases the induced draft. Moreover, additional turns and sharper parts in a chimney also influence the process and often maximize the flow resistance and minimize the draft in the system. Furthermore, rain caps and other terminals increase flow resistance depending on the terminals’ materials, geometries, and size. Proper design of a venting system requires information and specific data that address flue gas flow through the venting system, especially in solid fuel appliances. Such information and pertinent data can be obtained from published materials describing modeling and reported testing of the entire venting system (including test results published by manufacturers on their products).  

"Impact of Chimney-top Appurtenances on Flue Gas Flow" was authored by Pegah Farshadmanesh, Mehdi Modares and Jamshid Mohammadi with the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology.  This report summarizes findings of a comprehensive search of available published papers on chimney-top device flow resistance including reported testing and modeling, fire accident investigations, and other related studies. The gap in the needed knowledge is determined in an effort to provide insight into what is needed for development of guidance for installing rain caps and other chimney-top devices with technical substantiation.

Download the complete report, free of charge, from the Foundation website

NFPA has issued the following errata on NFPA 1, Fire Code, and NFPA 101, Life Safety Code:

Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • NFPA 1, Errata 1-15-1, referencing 2.2, Table 6.1.14.4.1(a) and (b), 13.3.1.6, 13.7.2.13.2.1, 14.11.3.3, 18.5.2, 18.5.3, 20.1.2, 20.1.5.12, 25.1.1, 25.3, 25.4, A.3.3.164.2, and A.13.3.2.9.1 of the 2015 edition.  Issuance date: December 15, 2014
  • NFPA 101, Errata 101-15-4, referencing 12.2.5.3, 17.2.11.1.2, 20.4.3, Table 22.1.6.1, Table 22.4.4.2.1, Table 23.1.6.1, 40.2.5.3.2, 42.2.2.3.1, 42.2.2.6.2, 42.2.2.9.2, 42.2.4, 42.7.4, A.8.8, and A.24.1.1.2 of the 2015 edition.  Issuance date: December 15, 2014

An errata is a correction issued to an NFPA Standard, published in NFPA News, Codes Online, and included in any further distribution of the document.

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The percentage of fatal fire victims 65 and older has been increasing while the percentage of victims under 5 has fallen.




According to NFPA’s new report, +Characteristics of Home Fire Victims+, older adults had the highest risk of fire death in the US compared to other age groups. In 2007-2011, people 65 and over were 2.4 times as likely to be killed in a home fire as the overall population. While children under five have historically also been a high risk group, their risk has dropped to 1.1 times that of the general population. The percentage of fatal home fire victims under five years of age fell from 18% in 1980 to 6% in 2011, while the percentage of victims 65 or older increased from 19% to 31% over the same period*. *The risk of home fire injury varies less with age than the risk of fire death.   


While the majority of home fire victims were white, African Americans, relative to their share of the population, were roughly twice as likely to be fatally injured in a home fire in 2007-2011 as the overall population.  The Hispanic home fire death rate was half that of the overall population. The difference was even greater for children and older adults.


African-American children under five had a home fire death rate of 23.0 deaths per million population, four times the 5.5 rate seen for white children and three times the 7.4 rate for Hispanic children and more than the same age. 


For African-American 65 and over, the rate was 56.3 deaths per million population, three times the 17.7 rate for white older adults and almost five times the 12.3 death rate experienced by older Hispanics. 


While great progress has been made, these statistics show that there is still a lot of work to be done to improve fire safety for ALL of our people.  Read the full report to learn more.

 

Submit public comments
Deadline: February 1, 2015

At its August 2014 meeting, the NFPA Standards Council reviewed the scope and title for a new committee on Facilities for Fire Training and Associated Props. After review of all the material before it, the Council voted to publish a notice to solicit public comments for the need of the project, information on subject matter resources, those interested in participating, if established, and other organizations actively involved with the subject.

The following justification for the new project has been submitted to the Council:

a. Explain the Scope of the new project/document:
Standard on Fire Training Structures, Props, and Equipment.

b. Provide an explanation and any evidence of the need for the new project/document:

The Fire Service Training TC currently is assigned responsibility for NFPA 1402, Guide to Building Fire Service Training Centers, which is a document that provides general information to architects, engineers, and fire service entities on possible components of fire training centers. The scope of the document is "food for thought" and ideas to consider when planning or designing a training center. The committee is aware that there is an increasing need to have a prescriptive standard available to provide minimum mandatory requirements for the manufacturing, installation, and maintenance of gas-fired props, and for the design and construction of live fire training structures (burn buildings) and other training props. This need has surfaced because of a growing awareness of fire fighter injuries that have occurred with gas-fired training props that have not been designed and constructed in a manner that provides a minimum required level of safety to all participants. The Fire Service Training TC has a growing concern that if a nationally recognized standard is not developed for gas-fire live fire training props we will see additional injuries and potentially fire fighter fatalities in the future.

The Committee has spent the past two years evaluating the possibility of converting 1402 from a guide to a standard. It has concluded that a new, separate standard for fire training structures, props, and equipment is needed and that the remainder of 1402 needs to remain as a guide for the following reasons:

(1.) The Training Committee has expanded the scope of the new, proposed standard from just live fire training structures, props, and equipment to also include non-live fire training structures, props, and equipment. This would move more of the exiting 1402 content into the new standard.  Given this increased scope, the Training Committee believes it is important to separate these items into a new standard.

(2.) The current version of 1402 contains information intended to provoke thought for anyone planning to build a fire training center. Most of the current text does not need to be converted to a standard.  If 1402 were converted to a standard, most of the existing content would move to the annex, in which case:

a. Readers might not know it is there. b. Most of it would not relate directly to any content in the body of the standard. c. By being in the annex of a standard instead of in a guide, the content might be interpreted as standard requirements, too. Legal entities already try to interpret the current 1402 guide as if it is a standard.  Moving that content into the annex of a standard would strengthen the position of those legal entities. 

c. Identify intended users of the new project/document:
(1.) Manufacturers of gas-fired and other live fire training props used to train fire fighters. (2.) Architects and engineers that design fire training structures and props and specify fire training equipment. (3.) Fire agencies that purchase gas-fired props and other fire training structures and props to train fire fighters. (4.) Fire fighters that are potentially exposed to unacceptable risk from gas-fired and other fire training props and structures that have not been manufactured, designed, and constructed to a nationally accepted standard. (5.) Operators of fire fighter training centers.

d. Identify individuals, groups and organizations that should review and provide input on the need for the proposed new project/document; and provide contact information for these groups:

ISFSI; IFSTA; IAFC; NVFC; IAFF; NAFTD; Manufacturers; Technical Committee on Fire Service Training, Technical Committee on Special Effects. 

e Identify individuals, groups and organizations that will be or could be affected, either directly or indirectly, by the proposed new project/document, and what benefit they will receive by having this new document available:

See item C above.

f. Identify other related documents and projects on the subject both within NFPA and external to NFPA: 

NFPA 1402 is a related document but is an advisory document that cannot mandate minimum requirements.

NFPA 1403 is related in that it mandates minimum requirements and procedures for live fire training exercises.

DIN standard (Germany or whole EU?) addresses the subject in a limited capacity.

g. Identify the technical expertise and interest necessary to develop the project/document, and if the committee membership currently contains this expertise and interest: 

See C above. In addition, the Fire Service Training TC currently has the necessary expertise, including two manufacturers  of gas-fired  training props, a special expert also in the gas-fired training prop manufacturing industry, engineers that specify gas-fired training props for fire fighter training centers and design fire training structures, builders of fire training structures, owners of fire training centers that use fire training structures and props, users of fire training structures and props, manufacturers of fire fighter training materials related to fire training structures and props, and representation from national research/testing laboratories.  In addition, the Fire Service Training TC has organized a task group of outside experts, especially from the 160 Committee, to assist with the standard for gas-fired props.

h. Provide an estimate on the amount of time needed to develop the new project/document: 

The proposed document could be developed in approximately three years.

i. Comment on the availability of data and other information that exists or would be needed to substantiate the technical requirements and other provisions of the proposed new project/ document: 

The Fire Service Training TC believes that there is adequate availability of data and information on the "best practices" design and construction of gas-fired fire fighter training props and fire training structures and props that are required to substantiate the technical requirements and other provisions of the proposed new project.

 

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Pam Elliott doesn't recall the flames or smoke from the house fire that enveloped her 55 years ago. She does remember a Good Samaritan who quickly entered her home and whisked her to safety. The damage was done, however; Elliott received burns on 50 percent of her body. She was only five years old.


 

These injuries haven't slowed down this North Carolina firecracker. She's had a successful career as a burn nurse, and makes a passionate plea for home fire sprinklers whenever she can. (Elliott was one of the speakers at NFPA's recent Fire Sprinkler Initiative Summit.) "I'm here to speak for those who can’t speak for themselves and those most vulnerable in house fires: infants, children, the elderly, and the disabled,” said Elliott, who was recently profiled in +NFPA Journal+ along with three other sprinkler advocates making waves across North America.


 

Elliott joins an army of other burn survivors that are promoting devices that could have prevented their tragedies had they been installed in their homes. Learn how and why these advocates are championing for home fire sprinklers by visiting the Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.


 

  Related articles


!http://i.zemanta.com/309854219_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/309854219_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Burn survivor Pam Elliott brings summit attendees to their feet with passionate plea for continued sprinkler efforts

Jobs
Do you want to make a difference? NFPA's public education division is hiring for three new positions! The Public Education Regional Specialists will work remotely and be responsible for promoting the use of NFPA fire-safety education materials at the state and local level. They will serve in an ambassadorial role for the Association on a regional level by being an effective spokesperson for all NFPA public education and advocacy initiatives on behalf of NFPA, and providing an NFPA presence for fire departments in the region while coordinating field activities with Association staff. 

Job requirements include a minimum of 7 years experience in the design, implementation and evaluation of fire-safety education materials, proven public speaking experience, the ability to communicate effectively with fire safety educators and fire marshals to have a positive influence among these constituents. Travel will also be required up to 30% of the time. 

For more job requirements, a list of principle responsibilities and to apply online, please visit our careers web page

 

Christmas trees are a festive emblem of the holiday season, but they also present a potential fire risk in the home.

Although Christmas tree fires aren’t particularly common, when they do occur, they are likely to be serious. On average, one of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death, compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires. One of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.

In addition, Christmas trees are flammable objects. The longer they remain in the home, the more dried out they become, making them increasingly hazardous.

Fortunately, the vast majority of Christmas tree fires are preventable with some simple safety precautions. The video above demonstrates easy ways to safely enjoy a Christmas tree in your home this holiday season.

You can also visit our "Put a Freeze on Winter Fires" section, which offers a wealth of tips and recommendatinos for keeping fire-safe during this holiday season and all winter long.

12131977
121319772

In the early morning hours of December 13, 1977, a fire occurred at Aquinas Hall, a dormitory at Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island.  This fire resulted in the deaths of ten female students who were resident s of the fourth floor.  The primary fuel for the fire was highly combustible Christmas decorations that had been put up in the corridors.  Physical evidence indicates that the fire started near a fourth floor sleeping room.

Aquinas Hall was of mixed construction with a majority of the building being protected by non- combustible construction.  It's a four story building with the first floor being used for class rooms and a chapel, and the second, third, and fourth floors occupied as girl's dormitory space.  Interior finish was primarily non-combustible with exception of the concealed fiber board ceiling above the suspended non-combustible mineral tile.  Fire alarm system which consisted of manual pull stations and three combination rate-of-rise, fixed temperature heat detectors.  The heat detectors were located at the top of each stairway. 

The most significant factors which led to the multiple life loss in this fire were the presence of highly combustible Christmas decorations, and the long dead end corridor near the room of fire origin.  Contributing factors were the absence of an early warning fire detection system, no automatic suppression system and poor compartmentation of the room of origin, as indicated by the fire spread even though the door was closed.

For the full NFPA Fire Journal article.  To learn about Home Christmas Tree and Holiday Light Fires and Home Structure Fires that Began with Decorations

Wyoming Fire Sprinkler CoalitionJack Swanson proudly displays his " Fire Sprinklers Save Lives" sticker inside his company office in Casper, Wyoming. But the insurance agent with Mountain West Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company wasn't always a full-time sprinkler supporter. In fact, when his client Justin Smith, chair of the Wyoming Fire Sprinkler Coalition, initially asked him to join the group that's focused on home fire sprinkler education, he begrudgingly agreed to attend the first meeting.

"When he first asked me to come, I told him I was pretty busy," Swanson says with a laugh. "But I went and since then I’ve gotten on board with the entire thing. I truly believe in it. Sometimes you surprise yourself when you get so involved in something you didn't expect." Swanson's colleaugue, Gene Kessner, the company's district claims manager, has also joined the coalition.

Swanson's involvement with the coalition became an enlightening experience. Watching a live burn/sprinkler demonstration and discovering the facts about sprinklers, he gradually understood the incredible role these devices play in safeguarding property. "After attending the coalition meetings, I made a few phone calls and sent a couple emails," Swanson tells NFPA. "There was another insurance company giving a [home fire] sprinkler discount ... and I thought that completely made sense."


NFPA has issued the following errata on NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, and NFPA 1192, Standard on Recreational Vehicles:

        Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • NFPA 30, Errata 30-15-1, referencing Figure 16.4.1(b), Table 16.5.2.1 and Note 4; and Table 16.5.2.3, Note 5 of the 2015 edition, issuance date: December 11, 2015
  • NFPA 1192, Errata 1192-15-1, referencing 3.3.39* of the 2015 edition, issuance date: December 11, 2015

An errata is a correction issued to an NFPA Standard, published in NFPA News, Codes Online, and included in any further distribution of the document.

“What’s the difference between ‘Put a Freeze on Winter Fires’ and ‘Project Holiday’?” That’s the question a few people have recently asked, and it’s one that’s worth clarifying, since there are some key differences between the two programs (as well as some crossover). WinterFreeze14Banner

Our “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires” campaign with USFA promotes winter fire safety directly to the public, addressing the leading causes of fires and other hazards during the colder months and holiday season. This includes home heating, cooking, holiday decorating and carbon monoxide poisoning. The campaign runs from November through March, and features regular updates on both organizations’ websites.

Project Holiday banner“Project Holiday” - a program that’s hosted each year by our Public Education division - works to communicate holiday fire safety messaging through local fire departments. It provides a wide range of resources and information for fire departments to promote holiday-related fire safety in their communities. Materials include sample news releases, media advisories, and letters to the editor. “Project Holiday” also features a parent page with suggested family activities, along with age-appropriate games and activities for kids.

What “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires” and “Project Holiday” have in common is a commitment to educating the public about simple ways to stay safe from fire this holiday season. Check out both programs to find a wealth of related tips, information and resources.

Usually when I write blog posts I like to include a quote from a philosopher, a head of state or a historical figure. Is it odd that the person I want to quote for this piece is a musician? David Bowie in his song "Changes" has a refrain that is "Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes." If you are a Facility Manager at a health care facility we know that you face the challenge of splitting your time among many tasks including compliance with NFPA codes and standards. With the BIG changes that have happened between 1999 and now to NFPA 101 and NFPA 99, the challenge only becomes more evident. NFPA is here to help with that challenge. 

We've chosen Jim Lathrop an industry expert as well as a senior instructor with NFPA to help guide you through the major changes to NFPA 101 and NFPA 99. Knowing that it's tough for Facility Managers to step off their property to train, we've set up a 3-hour interactive training session on January 20, 2015 delivered through a live broadcast over the Web. 

Here are some highlights of what Jim will cover on January 20


NFPA 99 Changes from 1999 to 2012

  • Explain the concept of risk assessment as used in the 2012 Edition of NFPA 99.
  • Understand how the provisions for Medical Gas and Vacuum systems have changed between 2000 and 2012.
  • Describe what is meant by wet procedure locations.
  • Describe the advantages of the 2012 edition of NFPA 99 over the 1999 Edition.

NFPA 101 Changes from 2000 to 2012

  • Describe some of the major changes in the core chapters of NFPA 101 that will benefit health care facilities upon the adoption of the 2012 edition of NFPA 101.
  • Describe some of the major changes in the health care chapters of NFPA 101 between the 2000 and 2012 editions.
  • Explain suites, what they are, what are their benefits, and what are some of the major changes in suites between the 2000 and 2012 editions of NFPA 101.

Click here if you'd like to find out more about this event.

January 5th, 2015 marks a major milestone in the enhancement of NFPA’s online platform: the first  Public Input closing date for which all materials will be submitted online.  Beginning with the 44 Fall 2016 NFPA Standards, paper submissions will no longer be accepted. By utilizing a completely online platform, NFPA will facilitate wider and easier participation in the development of its Standards. As an organization, this transition is yet another step forward as NFPA continues to promote a digital first approach focused on solution-based products and services. 

Thank you to all NFPA participants for embracing the enhancements and NFPA’s online platform. 

If you have not yet submitted your Public Input, and there exists a particular standard that interests you, please go online to submit prior to the January 5, 2015 deadline.  Simply, go to the next edition tab on the relevant document information page and click “The next edition of this standard is now open for Public Input" or the "Submit Public Input online” link to get started. If you have any questions or need assistance with the online submission system for public input or public comment, please feel free to contact us at 617-984-7242, or via email at standardsdev_support@nfpa.org.

Yesterday, I blogged about a TV program in Germany that contacted us to find out why NFPA’s mascot is a dalmation. Our team videotaped the above answer from Ken Willette, NFPA’s division manager of public fire protection.

I also asked if anyone else knew why a Dalmatian is our mascot. Kudos to Michele Steinberg, our division manager of wildland fires – she got it right!

DownloadSuch sad news from earlier this week; a Philadelphia firefighter died battling a blaze in the West Oak Lane neighborhood and became the city's first female firefighter to die in the line of duty. 

Joyce Craig-Lewis was one of 150 women on the department and an 11-year veteran. She is survived by two children, a 16-year-old-son and 16-month-old daughter, as well as her parents, two sisters, and a brother.

Mayor Nutter remarked that Craig-Lewis loved her job, and was a highly-trained firefighter who served in some of the busiest stations in the city on behalf of the citizens. “The fire department, one of the best in the United States of America… has suffered a tremendous loss. That loss extends to all Philadelphians.”

Philadelphia Fire Commissioner said Craig-Lewis was helping fight a fire in the basement of the residence.

“Those that know anything about basement fires knows that basement fires are a challenge," he said. "During this firefight, the incident commander commanded the first arriving company to withdraw from the basement. After the withdraw, they realized that Firefighter Craig Lewis was missing… They were not able to get her out before she passed.”

He added: “I know she was a great firefighter. I know she gave her life protecting the citizens of this city.”

Our thoughts are with her family, fire department and the people of Philadelphia during this time. 

Ken and Sparky

A TV program in Germany recently contacted us with the following question: Why is a dalmatian the mascot of NFPA?  We videotaped the answer today, thanks to the help of Ken Willette, our division manager for public fire protection, and Sparky the Fire Dog®.

Anyone out there know the answer to that question? Tell us what you think – we’ll share Ken’s official answer tomorrow and see who knows their fire history.

MA state fire marshal
“I have responded to hundreds of fatal fires in my state, and it’s hard to rationalize how decisions [on mandatory home fire sprinkler installations] can be based strictly on cost while not recognizing the effect fire has on our society,” says Massachusetts State Fire Marshal Stephen Coan, who has headed the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services since its creation in 1995.

For years, Coan has been a tireless force in the push for statewide sprinkler requirements. His department has a seat on the state's Board of Building Regulations and Standards (BBRS), which adopts building regulations and administers provisions of the state building code. Though he's urged the BBRS to adopt sprinkler requirements, the board has voted against these endeavors on numerous occasions.

Learn about Coan's push for home fire sprinklers by visiting the Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.

We are delighted to welcome two new staff to our Denver and Quincy offices. Tom Welle joins the Denver office as a senior project manager and supervisor. Faith Berry joins the Quincy office as an associate project manager. Both Tom and Faith will contribute to the Division's mission of reducing risks to life and property from wildfire through advocacy, outreach, education, research and codes and standards.

TomTom joins NFPA from a career in public service and wildland firefighting. Most recently, he spent more than a decade with Douglas County, Colorado, as a ranger and land management specialist. He has also instructed technical firefighting classes and volunteers with the Colorado Civil Wing Air Patrol.

F Faithaith is familiar to readers of Fire Break as one of NFPA's six Firewise Regional Advisors, contracted with NFPA from 2011 to 2013. Faith has extensive experience in working with communities on fire and land management issues, including work as a firefighter, park ranger, and Fire Safe Council coordinator. 

Everyone here at NFPA looks forward to working with the expanded team on all of NFPA's wildland fire safety projects and programs. Help us welcome Tom and Faith by leaving thoughts and comments below!

by Amanda Kimball

There are two open Requests for Proposals for Foundation projects. The projects are "Protection of Storage Under Sloped Ceilings - Phase 1" and "Use of Gaseous Suppression Systems in High-Airflow Spaces: Capabilities and Knowledge Gaps".  Both RFPs are accessible from the Foundation website.

Proposals for the protection of storage under sloped ceilings project are due December 18. Proposals for the use of gaseous suppression systems in high-airflow spaces are due January 9. Please contact Amanda Kimball at the Foundation with any questions.

Firewise Communitiesby NFPA's Cathy Prudhomme

Currently, 41 states actively participate in the national Firewise Communities/USA® program and represent a combined 1,142 communities that have achieved recognition status for their work to reduce their community’s wildfire risk. Nine of the sites have participated for more than a decade and have been with the program since the original pilot was launched in 2002. 

Up until recently, only two states – Arkansas and Washington had achieved the milestone of 100 plus participating communities; Colorado now joins the distinction of attaining the major accomplishment of reaching that benchmark. The Colorado State Forest Service is the program’s state liaison. In their role they work with stakeholders and private homeowners on wildfire mitigation projects and completing the criteria for program recognition. With 105 participating community's, Colorado is now the state with the third highest number of total communities successfully completing the requirements.

The Firewise Communities/USA Recognition Program is a process that empowers neighbors to work together in reducing their wildfire risk. Each community must annually demonstrate their on-going efforts of taking action and ownership in preparing and protecting their homes against the threat of wildfire. Using a five-step process, communities develop an action plan that guides their residential risk reduction activities, while engaging and encouraging neighbors to become active participants in building a safer place to live.  

The program is co-sponsored by the USDA Forest Service, the US Department of the Interior, and the National Association of State Foresters.

There's an old saying that "Rome wasn't built in a day" but I can't picture the empire of Rome applying it's renowned efficiency of the road builders  to constyruct an e-commerce site. What's the shipping cost on an XL purple tunic run these days? Is there a tax in Germania on battle axes? Can a chariot deliver a catapult to Brittania by RPS (Roman Parcel Service) in 3 days?  Imagine a Roman Emperor issuing an official decree to form a legion to build an efficient e-commerce site so that the empire would run smoothly. The people demand it!!!!

Here at NFPA, we aren't building stone roads or beautiful archways but we have been building a new e-commerce site. And, in our case, when the people took to the cyber roadways to let us know what changes we need to make, we listened. 

Most of us don't think of how an e-commerce site works other than entering our credit card, printing out our confirmation of goods purchased and waiting for some man with a hat driving a boxy looking truck to deliver our package. Based on watching the hard-working crew here at NFPA that have been building our new e-commerce site over the last 12 months I now know two things; 1. Coffee has been given intravenously for the last few weeks around launch 2. There's a ton of work that goes on behind the scenes to make this engine run.

We won't bore you with the technical details but here's the top 5 takewaways recently revealed on Roman Late Night Coliseum TV:

 

1. Improved navigation and product categories

2. A streamlined checkout system that will save you time

3. Enhanced search logic and results

4. Single sign on connected to your profile

5. User friendly design

So check out the new e-commerce engine  at nfpa.org/catalog and let us know what you think. E-mail Liz Hyde, Centurion of our legion lhyde@nfpa.org or stop by Legion headquarters at NFPA. We are on the 2nd floor next to the lion's den and across from codes and standards.

Cras Es Noster

UntitledThe head of NFPA's field operations division says tremendous progress has been made to improve workplace safety in Bangladesh. NFPA Vice President Don Bliss, speaking at the “2nd International Trade Expo for Building and Fire Safety,” said that in the 18 months since a building collapse killed 1,100 garment workers and injured 2,500 others at Rana Plaza outside Dhaka, a strong commitment to safety by apparel owners, government, global buyers and other stakeholders is making the industry safer for workers.

According to an article in theindependent, the three-day conference in Bangladesh was organized by the Alliance for Bangladesh Workers Safety, a coalition of 28 North American retailers to help ensure workers safety with globally certified safety equipment.

"In the developed world, we take for granted basic things like regular building inspections and paved roads for emergency vehicles to reach us in case of an accident," wrote Randolph Tucker, NFPA's First Vice Chair, in the May/June 2014 issue of NFPA Journal®. "As a developing country, though, Bangladesh’s physical infrastructure—which must accommodate nearly 155 million people in an area roughly the size of Iowa—is still modernizing. Its garment industry, which accounts for more than 80 percent of the country’s exports, is no different, and a series of high-profile factory fires in recent years has brought attention to the industry and its ties to brands and retailers around the world."

NFPA News The December issue of NFPA News, our codes and standards newsletter, is now available.

In this issue:

  • New document, NFPA 1986, seeking public input
  • Proposed TIA seeking public comment on NFPA 72
  • Council seeks public comment on two new projects: Fire-based community healthcare provider (FBCHP) program and SCAM of rescue tools
  • Standards Council preliminary minutes and decision available
  • TIAs issued and not issued
  • News in brief
  • Committees soliciting public input
  • Committees seeking members
  • Committee meetings calendar

Subscribe today! NFPA News is a free newsletter, and includes special announcements, notification of public input and comment closing dates, requests for comments, notices on the availability of Standards Council minutes, and other important news about NFPA’s standards development process.

The NFPA Technical Committee on Emergency Medical Services (EMS-AAA) convened a national emergency medical services (EMS) stakeholders meeting in April 2014 to discuss the subject of Mobile Integrated Healthcare/Community Paramedicine (MIH/CP). Over the past few years, there have been many changes to the delivery of healthcare, including the delivery of EMS, which has led to the need for this collaborative meeting.

The reforms compelled the EMS Technical Committee to organize a meeting for stakeholders to garner input from a broad group of healthcare professionals and to discuss the possibility for a new standard request on MIH/CP. The meeting afforded the opportunity to not only learn the opinions of prominent national EMS and healthcare professionals, but also to discuss how the NFPA could assist the community of actors involved in MIH/CP.

For an overview of the history of this process as well as what future plans look like, check out the video above or the infographic below. 

You can also download the full report from the national stakeholder meeting on mobile integrated healthcare and community paramedicine.

MIHCP

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c71a4cbf970b-550wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c71a4cbf970b-550wi|alt=Winter Fires graphic 2014_15|style=width: 550px;|title=Winter Fires graphic 2014_15|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c71a4cbf970b img-responsive!
Each year, NFPA and USFA team up to remind you that the winter months are the leading time of year for home fires in our Put a Freeze on Winter Fires campaign . To help you stay safe, we provide a wealth of safety tips and information on cooking, heating, candles and holiday decorating – factors that contribute to the increased risk of home fires in the months ahead. 


 

!http://lbackstrom.typepad.com/.a/6a014e86dfab17970d01bb07bf401b970d-200wi|src=http://lbackstrom.typepad.com/.a/6a014e86dfab17970d01bb07bf401b970d-200wi|alt=Twittericon.large|style=width: 200px; margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Twittericon.large|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a014e86dfab17970d01bb07bf401b970d img-responsive!This Wednesday, at 2:00pm ET, NFPA and USFA will join forces with ESFI to host a Twitter chat all about winter safety. We will discuss many important winter home fire topics and the ways to stay safe, and encourage all to follow along, and even submit questions of your own!


 

Please use #WinterSafety to follow along and to submit questions to the chat. We look forward to a fun discussion with you all!</p>

 

 

 

Holiday decorations are a hallmark of the season, but many of them carry potential fire hazards that can quickly turn a festive time of year into a tragic one.

As you deck your halls this holiday season, make sure to keep fire safety in mind. Home candle and decoration fires peak in December, with nearly half of all holiday decoration fires occurring because the decorations are placed too close to a heat source.

Two out of every five home decoration fires are started by candles. Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day are the top three days of the year for candle fires.

Christmas trees also present a potential fire hazard in the home; one of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.

Although Christmas tree fires aren’t particularly common, when they do occur, they are likely to be serious. Between 2007 and 2011, one of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death, compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires in that time.

Our “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires” campaign with USFA offers a host of tips and recommendations on holiday decorating, and for keeping fire-safe throughout the winter season. Make sure to check them out!

Please see this link for some important interim guidance that has been updated by the CDC relating to the use of PPE and Ebola. This interim guidance is intended for those who are engaged in EMS, fire, law emforcement, and public safety answering point (PSAP) personnel and goes into great detail on providing the highest level of safety to responders who might encounter a suspected ebola patient.

The NFPA has also been involved in this activity with the IAB and the CDC as there is NFPA 1999, Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations as well as NFPA 1581, Standard on Fire Department Infection Control Program which both are relevant to this subject. NFPA 1999 can be viewed online for free at this here and NFPA 1581 can also be viewed for free at this here.

1261985
At 3:56 p.m. on Friday, December 6, 1985, a natural gas explosion occurred at the River Restaurant in Derby, Connecticut.  It appears that a gas main may have been damaged during the refilling of a sewer excavation.  Before anyone became aware of the leak, escaping gas accumulated in the basement of the restaurant and came in contact with an undetermined ignition source.  The explosion killed six people in the restaurant, injured 12 other occupants, and completely destroyed the building housing the restaurant. Three people who were not in the restaurant were also injures by the explosion. 

For the full NFPA Fire Investigation report. To see the most recent statistical information on eating and drinking facilities download the NFPA Structure Fires by Occupancy 2007-2011

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Illinois sprinkler advocates at work



 

It’s been 10 years since the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation published its 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives as part of its Everyone Goes Home Program. Following these initiatives, the U.S. Fire Administration set a national goal of reducing line-of-duty firefighter deaths by 50 percent within the decade. &#0160;


 

The 16 initiatives have been a vital rallying call to unite the fire service. Every preventable death is a success, but we have more work to do. There were 104 on-duty firefighter deaths reported in the U.S. in 2004, according to NFPA. Over the next nine years, the numbers of fatalities were down in most years. There were 97 on-duty deaths in 2013.


In Illinois, firefighter deaths have declined to four in 2013 from highs of eight or nine in 2006, 2008, and 2009. How much of this improvement is due to firefighters embracing, or even understanding, Initiative #15, which states, “Advocacy must be strengthened for the enforcement of codes and the installation of home fire sprinklers?”


Too often, discussion of these important Initiatives, including #15, elicits blank stares among firefighters. We need to improve both awareness and understanding of each initiative. Why is this important to home fire sprinkler advocacy?  If we let another 10 years go by with only some firefighters learning about all of these Initiatives, especially #15, we risk losing firefighter lives in structures that could have been sprinklered. 


 

Read the rest of this important post, written by sprinkler advocate Tom Lia, by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.


!http://i.zemanta.com/309569023_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/309569023_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!New NFPA Journal highlights the work of four passionate home-sprinkler advocates

At its October 2014 meeting, the NFPA Standards Council voted to approve the development of a new committee and new document on Hybrid (Water and Inert Gas) Fire Extinguishing Systems. The Council directed that a call for members interested in serving on the proposed new Technical Committee be published. NFPA staff will return to the Council with a proposed startup roster and a proposed committee scope.

Hybrid (Water and Inert Gas) Fire Extinguishing Systems:  Submit online application 
Note: You will be asked to sign-in or create a free online account with NFPA before using this system.

To maintain consensus, all Technical Committees must have a balance of interest categories.  For definitions of the interest categories, see Guidelines to Classifications of Committee Members.

 

NFPA's Ken Willette invites your participation in the development of NFPA's standard on fire hoses.

A researcher at Worcester Polytechnic Institute is working on a project to make fire hoses more fire-resistant. The project, managed by Kathy Notarianni, an associate professor in the Fire Protection Engineering Department at WPI, follows a fire in Boston's Back Bay neighbrhood last March in which two firefighters died after their attack fire hose burned.

All research on this topic is being forwarded to the NFPA Technical Committee on Fire Hose, which develops NFPA 1961, Standard on Fire Hose, which will consider any proposed revisions to the document.

Ken Willette, manager of NFPA's public fire protection division, says there are two ways people can be part of the discussion on attack fire hoses. First, anyone can submit "public input" (proposed revisions) on NFPA 1961.

Second, the Committee on Fire Hose is seeking members from the following interest classifications: Installer/Maintainer, Applied Research/Testing Laboratory, Insurance, Consumer, Enforcer, Labor, Special Expert, and User. Please consider sumitting an application to join this committee and lend your expertise to this important issue.

This is a short video produced by Brian Dykens for a documentary project at UNC.  It is about a friend and fellow firefighter, Mike Ward, and his battle back from bladder cancer.

 

The Hidden Risk from Brian Alan on Vimeo.

At its October 2014 meeting, the NFPA Standards Council considered and reviewed the following new projects and is seeking public review and comment by the February 1, 2015 deadline:

Anyone interested in commenting on these new projects, should include the following information: resources on the subject matter, the names of those interested in participating on the Committee (if established), the names of other organizations actively involved with this subject, and whether there is a need for such a project.  Submit your comments to the Codes and Standards Administration Department, NFPA, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169-7471

12419802

1241980

On December 4, 1980, a fire occurred on the third floor of the conference facility at the Stouffer's Inn of Westchester, which was located in Harrison, New York.  Of approximately 95 occupants who were attending meetings in several conference rooms, 26 persons lost their lives and 24 were injured.  The fire did not involve guest rooms facilities of the hotel complex.

The fire originated in an exit access corridor outside the meeting rooms in the three-story, fire resistive, nonsprinklered building that was classified as a place of assembly.  In the early stages of the fire, meeting-room occupants were faced with rapidly deteriorating, untenable conditions that impeded their escape to safety.  This fire emphasizes the importance of maintaining the integrity of exit access areas and the extreme hazard to life safety when fire originates in such areas.

The significant factors contributing to the loss of life in this fire were:

  • the critical location of the fire in the intersection of the exit access corridors;
  • the rapid development of the fire through the combination of its origin and
  • the available fuel load provided by contents and furnishings in the exit access;
  • the lack of a remote second means of egress from some occupied meeting rooms; and
  • the lack of a fixed fire protection system to detect and extinguish the fire in itsincipient stage.   

For the full report download the NFPA Fire Journal article.

The NFPA Standards Council met on October 28-29, 2014 in Nashville, Tennessee. At the meeting, some of the following items were addressed by the Council:

  • an appeal on a proposed TIA to NFPA 70, 2014 edition on 517.41(E)
  • issuance of proposed TIAs on NFPA 70, 400, 1851, 1951, and 1971
  • new projects/documents on hybrid, gas, and fire water droplet systems; fire-based community healthcare provider (FBCHP) program.
  • consideration of a request from the Committee to enter new document, NFPA 1986, Standard on Respiratory Protection Equipment for Technical and Tactical Operations, into revision cycle.
  • consideration requests from Committees to change revision cycle schedules and committee scopes

Read the Council's preliminary minutes for the results of items addressed at its meeting.

Also, the Council issued a Final Decision on proposed Tentative Interim Amendment No. 1133 on NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, 2014 edition, section 517.41(E) (Agenda Item 14-10-2-d)

The NFPA Standards Council is a 13-person committee appointed by the NFPA Board of Directors that oversees the Association's codes and standards development activities, administers the rules and regulations, and acts as an appeals body. The Council administers about 250 NFPA Technical Committees and their work on nearly 300 documents addressing topics of importance to the built environment.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07bb99ea970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07bb99ea970d-320wi|alt=November Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=November Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07bb99ea970d img-responsive!Following the deaths of a 10 year old and her father from a house fire, Washington State sprinkler advocates convinced the surviving homeowner to rebuild with sprinklers. What they didn&#39;t expect was that the homeowner was initially dissuaded to install sprinklers by a key group.


 

Get the details by reading NFPA&#39;s latest Fire Sprinkler Initiative newsletter. The November edition also includes information on:


    • NFPA's recent sprinkler summit, which has energized advocates across North America

    • a spike in home fire deaths in 2013

    • initiating meaningful dialogue with homebuilders


 

Stay abreast of sprinkler news by signing up for the free newsletter, delivered monthly to your inbox.


 

&#0160;Related articles


!http://i.zemanta.com/307850014_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/307850014_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Washington sprinkler coalition launches sprinkler education challenge
!http://i.zemanta.com/308100317_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/308100317_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!The Boston Globe underscores need for home fire sprinklers

The Industrial Fire Protection Section Executive Board Meeting was held in October 2014 at NFPA Headquarters in Quincy, MA. As part of the board's agenda, we were able to meet with top NFPA officials from different areas of the organization to learn about different projects. Our first speaker was Don Bliss, Vice President of Field Operations at NFPA. 

Dbliss_LThumb

Don explained that NFPA has offices in the United States, Latin America, China, Europe, the Middle East and Canada. "One of the main jobs of our field operations office is for the adoption of NFPA Codes and Standards around the world. Field operations likes to establish partnerships with other organizations to achieve its goals----like partnerships with fire chiefs."  A lot of the work done "on the ground" in the United States setting up partnerships is handled by our Regional Directors.

The role of our Regional Directors  is to educate local communities about the latest NFPA codes and standards. One of the projects underway across the U.S. is the home fire sprinkler initiative. New York and New Jersey are two states that came very close to passing this initiative and the team will continue to push for adoption all over the U.S.

In other parts of the world, our field operations team works with governments and partner organizations to improve codes and standards development but in some cases this presents a challenge. Don explains that "Developing nations often don’t have the infrastructure to institute full codes and standards so we try and work within their systems to establish parts of the standards."

At the end of the day the main goal of Don's team is to help relieve the burden of fire all over the world. Our international stakeholders allow NFPA to receive input from outside the United States and help acieve our mission. Don gave the example of Brazil as a country his team is working with to adopt NFPA codes and standards. Rio De Janero and Sao Paulo are two of the cities in line to adopt NFPA 1. Don also gave an update on two other foreign locations:

1. In the Middle East, our training programs  hit a milestone as we have been able to translate our training to Arabic

2. In India, we are working with the rail system on their codes and standards adoption

Don ended his presentation by thanking the members of the Executive Board for their commitment to NFPA.

For more information about the Industrial Fire Protection Section, go to:

http://www.nfpa.org/member-access/member-sections/industrial-fire-protection

Ifps logo

 FirewatchNovember
Oily rags in an open trash can in the kitchen of an assisted-living facility spontaneously ignited, starting a fire that spread to a wall until heat activated a sprinkler. The three-story, wood-frame building, which measured 100 feet(30 meters), contained 80 unites in addition to common spaces. The building's fire alarm system monitored the water flow of the wet-pipe sprinkler, which was installed in compliance with the local code. A building occupant who heard the fire alarm activate discovered the fire in the kitchen and tried unsuccessfully to extinguish the blaze using a dry chemical portable fire extinguisher. by the time firefighters arrived at 9 p.m., however, a single sprinkler head had already extinguished the fire. Investigators determined that someone had improperly disposed of oily rags in the regular trash and that they had ignited spontaneously. The sprinkler spared the building significant fire damage, keeping losses to $5,000. There were no injuries.

Kenneth J. Tremblay, 2014," Firewatch", NFPA Journal, November/December 32.

To read more fire incidents NFPA Journal Firewatch

There are two open Requests for Proposals for Foundation projects.  The projects are "Protection of Storage Under Sloped Ceilings - Phase 1" and "Use of Gaseous Suppression Systems in High-Airflow Spaces: Capabilities and Knowledge Gaps".  Both RFPs are accessible from the Foundation website.  Proposals for the protection of storage under sloped ceilings project are due December 18th.  Proposals for the use of gaseous suppression systems in high-airflow spaces are due January 9th.  Please contact Amanda Kimball (akimball@nfpa.org) at the Foundation with any questions.

NFPA 72The following proposed Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) for NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, is being published for public review and comment:

Anyone may submit a comment on this proposed TIA by the January 16, 2015 closing date. Along with your comment, please identify the number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

1211977
On December 1, 1977, a fire which occurred on the sixth floor of a luxury hotel in Bermuda killed three people.  The fire burned the entire length of an undivided corridor which measured almost 500 feet in length.  At the time of the fire, the hotel was undergoing renovations so therefore there were no occupants in a large section of the sixth floor.  The renovations resulted in an excessive combustible load in the corridor area.  The cause of the fire is still under investigation and the origin was in the sixth floor corridor.   

The hotel was a "T" shaped building and contained six guest floors.  The building construction was of metal frame with spray -on fireproofing on column and main beams.  Interior construction was of gypsum board on metal studs.  Fire protection equipment in the hotel included hose reels located throughout the corridors along with stand pipes for fire department use.  A heat detection system was provided with detectors located in such areas as closets, storage areas, and other hazardous locations.  Manual pull stations were located throughout the building and activation of any of the heat detectors or the manual pull stations would result in a pyre signal alarm at the telephone operator station and in engineering.  

At the time of the hotel fire, there were civil disturbances in Bermuda that resulted in simultaneous fires.  This meant that fewer fire fighters were available to fight the hotel fire than would normally have been the case.  The hotels own private fire brigade, however, assisted the public brigade in containing the fire and preventing further loss of life.  This fire demonstrates the need to be aware of fire hazards created during renovation of buildings; especially when they are to be occupied during the renovation.  It also demonstrates that even under prolonged and heavier fire loading than anticipated, the existing standards for corridor wall construction proved most satisfactory.  

For more information on this fire download this July 1978 Fire Journal article To see the NPFA report on Fires in Residential Properties under Construction or Undergoing Major Renovation

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