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Iphone photos 12-2014 272

The 2014 Motorsports Engineering Conference was held this past December 9 and 10 in Indianapolis, Indiana, and was sponsored by the University of Indiana Purdue and the Center for Advanced Product Evaluation (CAPE). This conference was held in conjunction with the Performance Racing Industry Trade Show, one of the largest racing industry trade shows in the country. These two events bring together racing industry personnel from around the world to see the latest innovations, network, and discuss the most recent challenges faced by the Motorsports community and has a correlation to the NFPA 610 document, Guide for Emergency and Safety Operations at Motorsports Venues.

At the engineering conference several topics where presented such as; driver safety review, manufacture and performance of the FIA8860 Super Helmet, helmet performance comparisons, cockpit Surround Foam evaluation testing, and evaluation of enhanced roll over protection. The roll over protection evaluation included an actual "live" test held at the CAPE facility.

Iphone photos 12-2014 189

Iphone photos 12-2014 192

 

This test was designed to replicate the race car having rolled onto its side from a primary crash then striking the track wall at the top of the roll cage in a resultant secondary crash. This was to determine if the design of the race car roll cage prevented a head strike of the driver. The impact of the crash was measured at 40,000 lbf. and was determined by high speed video that the driver's head did strike the pad with lethal force.

NFPA 610 Guide for Emergency and Safety Operations at Motorsports Venues 2009 edition covers planning, training, personnel, equipment, and facilities as they relate to emergency and safety operations at motorsports venues. To view NFPA 610 go to http://www.nfpa.org/610

EbolaTo help protect emergency first responders from exposure to the Ebola virus, NFPA is seeking comments to a Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) to NFPA 1999: Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations. The TIA proposes a revision to the design and performance criteria of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to address the risk of exposure to the Ebola virus threat.

NFPA has posted the TIA on NFPA 1999 for public review and comment. To submit a comment, please e-mail the Secretary, Standards Council, by January 152015 at TIAs_Errata_FIs@nfpa.org.

The TIA follows work conducted by several organizations and federal agencies that recognized the need for a national PPE standard to protect emergency first responders against the Ebola Virus and other liquid-borne pathogens. The organizations include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization, the Human and Health Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and Interagency Board for Equipment Standardization and Interoperability.

Thank you for your time, consideration and input!

At its August 2014 meeting, the NFPA Standards Council reviewed the scope and title for a new committee on Facilities for Fire Training and Associated Props. After review of all the material before it, the Council voted to publish a notice to solicit public comments for the need of the project, information on subject matter resources, those interested in participating, if established, and other organizations actively involved with the subject.

The deadline for comments is February 15, 2015. See the full post written by NFPA's Steven Sawyer.

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The percentage of fatal fire victims 65 and older has been increasing while the percentage of victims under 5 has fallen.



 

by NFPA's Marty Ahrens



According to NFPA’s new report, +Characteristics of Home Fire Victims+, older adults had the highest risk of fire death in the US compared to other age groups. In 2007-2011, people 65 and over were 2.4 times as likely to be killed in a home fire as the overall population. While children under five have historically also been a high risk group, their risk has dropped to 1.1 times that of the general population. The percentage of fatal home fire victims under five years of age fell from 18% in 1980 to 6% in 2011, while the percentage of victims 65 or older increased from 19% to 31% over the same period*. *The risk of home fire injury varies less with age than the risk of fire death.   


While the majority of home fire victims were white, African Americans, relative to their share of the population, were roughly twice as likely to be fatally injured in a home fire in 2007-2011 as the overall population.  The Hispanic home fire death rate was half that of the overall population. The difference was even greater for children and older adults.


African-American children under five had a home fire death rate of 23.0 deaths per million population, four times the 5.5 rate seen for white children and three times the 7.4 rate for Hispanic children and more than the same age. 


For African-American 65 and over, the rate was 56.3 deaths per million population, three times the 17.7 rate for white older adults and almost five times the 12.3 death rate experienced by older Hispanics. 


While great progress has been made, these statistics show that there is still a lot of work to be done to improve fire safety for ALL of our people.  Read the full report to learn more.

 

ChimneyThe main function of a chimney structure is “draft” through which, flue gases and smoke are removed from the building. Several parameters influence draft including the chimney height and the temperature differences between the outside air and combusted gases inside the flue. Flow resistance decreases the induced draft. Moreover, additional turns and sharper parts in a chimney also influence the process and often maximize the flow resistance and minimize the draft in the system. Furthermore, rain caps and other terminals increase flow resistance depending on the terminals’ materials, geometries, and size. Proper design of a venting system requires information and specific data that address flue gas flow through the venting system, especially in solid fuel appliances. Such information and pertinent data can be obtained from published materials describing modeling and reported testing of the entire venting system (including test results published by manufacturers on their products).  

"Impact of Chimney-top Appurtenances on Flue Gas Flow" was authored by Pegah Farshadmanesh, Mehdi Modares and Jamshid Mohammadi with the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology.  This report summarizes findings of a comprehensive search of available published papers on chimney-top device flow resistance including reported testing and modeling, fire accident investigations, and other related studies. The gap in the needed knowledge is determined in an effort to provide insight into what is needed for development of guidance for installing rain caps and other chimney-top devices with technical substantiation.

Download the complete report, free of charge, from the Foundation website

NFPA 1999, 2013 editionNFPA is seeking public review and comment on a proposed Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) on NFPA 1999, Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations, 2013 edition.  This TIA proposes to revise design and performance criteria of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and address the risk of exposure to the Ebola virus threat. 

The TIA follows work conducted by several organizations and federal agencies that recognized the need for a national PPE standard to protect emergency first responders against the Ebola Virus and other liquid-borne pathogens. The organizations include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization, the Human and Health Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and Interagency Board for Equipment Standardization and Interoperability.

This TIA can be reviewed on the Current & Prior Editions tab of the NFPA 1999 Document Information Page.

Anyone may submit a comment on this proposed TIA by the January 15, 2015 closing date. Along with your comment, please identify the number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

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