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August 26, 2016 Previous day Next day

09.JPGNFPA’s DiNenno Prize Selection Committee invites public safety experts to nominate an innovation that has enhanced public safety for the 2017 DiNenno Prize.

 

The prestigious DiNenno Prize, modeled after the Nobel Prize, recognizes important breakthroughs that have had a significant impact on public safety, including building, fire and electrical safety. The prize is named for the late Philip J. DiNenno (pictured here), the highly regarded former CEO of Hughes Associates and distinguished NFPA board leader, in recognition of his extraordinary contributions to fire safety. Nominations for the Prize are by invitation-only. Invitations were sent to prominent public safety organizations and individual public safety experts. The deadline to nominate an innovation is November 1, 2016. The winner will be announced in May 2017 and the award will be given at a plenary session at the 2017 NFPA Conference & Expo (C&E), to be held June 5-7, in Boston, MA.                                          

 

The 2016 DiNenno Prize winner was the technical achievement, oxygen consumption calorimetry. The award and prize money were presented to Dr. William Parker of the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology) for developing the device, a notable foundation of modern quantitative fire protection engineering. Oxygen consumption calorimetry determines the heat release rate of a fire by measuring the rate at which oxygen is consumed. It is often used to evaluate the fire safety of materials and assemblies, making it a crucial element of modern fire testing methods.

 

What great discovery will earn the 2017 DiNenno Prize?

Audrey.jpg

The Los Angeles Daily News reports that NASA has created artificial intelligence (AI) to make the quick decisions needed to help save the lives of first responders during dangerous situations. The system is called AUDREY which stands for Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction and sYnthesis.

 

Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) joined forces with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to develop the new AI. DHS hopes that the technology will become a game-changing resource for the “Next Generation First Responder. “AUDREY pulls data from the environment and the equipment carried by first responders, and detects any temperature changes, gases or other threats. If AUDREY picks up any concern signals, a warning will be sent to the person in the field.

 

This artificial intelligence bridges the gap in communications and shares situational information with more than one agency at the same time. As reported in NFPA Journal®, emergency responders are increasingly outfitted with sensors, heads up displays and augmented glasses. Data collected can then be shared with fire leader’s onsite to determine the location of firefighters, their vital signs and any potential hazards on scene. AUDREY can also tap into a home’s smart technology to determine any causes or trouble spots.

 

If all goes according to plan, firefighters will have found a great friend in AUDREY.

 

The Los Angeles Daily News reports that NASA has created artificial intelligence (AI) to make the quick decisions needed to help save the lives of first responders during dangerous situations. The system is called AUDREY which stands for Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction and sYnthesis.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) joined forces with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to develop the new AI. DHS hopes that the technology will become a game-changing resource for the “Next Generation First Responder. “AUDREY pulls data from the environment and the equipment carried by first responders, and detects any temperature changes, gases or other threats. If AUDREY picks up any concern signals, a warning will be sent to the person in the field.

This artificial intelligence bridges the gap in communications and shares situational information with more than one agency at the same time. As reported in NFPA Journal®, emergency responders are increasingly outfitted with sensors, heads up displays and augmented glasses. Data collected can then be shared with fire leader’s onsite to determine the location of firefighters, their vital signs and any potential hazards on scene. AUDREY can also tap into a home’s smart technology to determine any causes or trouble spots.

If all goes according to plan, firefighters will have found a great friend in AUDREY.

The smell of fresh spun cotton candy, the greasy fried food, and the whirling rides.  It's carnival season!  Who doesn't remember the excitement of the local county fair when they were a kid?  But how many people thought about the codes and standards that help ensure visitors and workers are kept safe? I sure didn't.

 

NFPA 1, Fire Code, Section 10.14 provides requirements for special outdoor events, carnivals and fairs.  Concession booths are a particular concern at fairs.  Many contain flammable liquids, commercial cooking equipment, and are producing grease laden vapors.  Often times concession stands are crammed into one small pedestrian area, concentrating the potential hazard into a confined, high-traffic zone.

 

 

Overall, the AHJ is permitted to regulate all outdoor events such as carnivals and fairs as it pertains to access for emergency vehicles, access to fire protection equipment, placement of stands and concession booths, and exhibits, as well as the control of hazardous conditions dangerous to life and property.   The AHJ plays an important role in reviewing the layout of the event; where concessions and vendors can be located, making sure proper egress is maintained, and keeping the necessary access for fire department vehicles available in case of an emergency.

 

In addition, NFPA 1 specifically addresses the protection of concession stands with the following requirements:

  • 10.14.5 A minimum of one portable fire extinguisher be provided for each concession stand where required by the AHJ.
  • 10.14.8 Concession stands utilized for cooking shall have a minimum of 10 ft (3 m) of clearance on two sides and must not be located within 10 ft (3 m) of amusement rides or devices.
  • 50.2.1.9: Cooking equipment used in fixed, mobile, or temporary concessions, such as trucks, buses, trailers, pavilions, tents, or any form of roofed enclosure, shall comply with NFPA 96 or Chapter 50 unless otherwise exempted by the AHJ in accordance with 1.3.2 of NFPA 96.
  • Additional guidance is provided in Section 10.14 for electrical equipment, communications, power sources, and life safety evaluations for fairs and carnivals.

 

By following the necessary precautions in NFPA 1, carnivals and fairs can continue to be a fun and memorable event for everyone.

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