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2016

NEC Online from NFPA

Get your free 2-day trial of NEC Online for instant access to updates in NFPA’s National Electrical Code!

 

As a professional in the electrical industry, you don’t have to look much further than code requirements to know how dynamic this industry is. In fact, the three most recent editions of NFPA 70: National Electrical Code (NEC) has seen more than 10 new articles and hundreds of changes that reflect emerging technologies and advancements in electrical and fire safety.

 

That’s why as the 2017 NEC edition rolls out this fall, NFPA has developed a new resource, NEC Online, to provide electrical professionals a focused view of what's changed over nearly a decade of important NEC advancements. Why is this important? For one, looking back at previous editions allows you to see the evolution of the code. But even more importantly, as you know, not all states or jurisdictions have adopted the newest code edition.

 

For instance, if you are a contractor working in multiple states, you’ll need to have access to previous codes; the one that particular state has adopted. NEC Online gives you that flexibility and the assurance that you have what you need to get the project done right, and to code.

 

So whether you work in the office or onsite, on residential, commercial, industrial design installations or inspection projects, NEC Online can help make your job easier. Take a look at some of the other benefits:

 

  • Navigate and search instantly the 2017, 2014, and 2011 editions of NFPA 70: NEC
  • Identify code changes from edition to edition. You'll know what's new, deleted, or revised!
  • Understand key code revisions by using the change summaries provided by NFPA experts
  • View from any device, including smartphones and online tablets, or download PDFs for offline viewing
  • Share important NEC content with colleagues via email
  • Print or bookmark NEC sections for quick reference down the road

 

Sign up for your free NEC Online 2-day trial now by visiting NFPA’s website.

TRAINING FOR LIFE

NFPA 2-Day Hands-on Training for Facilities Managers: Essentials for Life Safety and Fire Protection

 

November 10-11 2016 Cranston, Rhode Island 

November 29-30 2016 Warren, New Jersey (near NYC)

 

 

Learn about the life-saving systems that protect your building's occupants, and see those systems in action though:   

• Classroom instruction led by experts from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA®) 

Special hands-on training and demonstrations of the critical fire protection and life safety equipment in a state-of-the-art training facility

• Guidance on requirements outlined in NFPA 101®: The Life Safety Code, NFPA 72®: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, and NFPA 25: Inspection Testing and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems

 

REGISTER NOW
Don't wait — space is limited!
Get the insights and know-how you need to manage vendors, provide answers to AHJs and, ultimately, keep your occupants safe. Ideal for anyone concerned with facility safety and code compliance including: facility maintenance personnel, building owners, engineers, designers, and project managers.

 

Complete details for this 2-day training are available HERE.

Sign up now for the "The Fire Fighter of the Future". This keynote presentation by Casey Grant of the Fire Protection Research Foundation, will be live-streamed from NFPA's Responder Forum. 

 

Monday, November 7, 2016  10:15-11:15 am ET 

 

New technology, including cyber-physical systems, innovative building controls, intuitive fire-fighting equipment, and smart apparatus are revolutionizing emergency response. The Fire Fighter of the Future will address collecting data from global sensors, processing the information centrally and utilizing the results locally. Sign up now.

 

View highlights from last year's presentation - click the play button.

 

 

The Responder Forum brings together representatives from 13 key fire organizations, subject matter experts, industry leaders, and NFPA staff to address emerging issues. Be a part of it remotely and join us for the Keynote Presentation on the Fire Fighter of the Future!

home structure fires report

 

An average of 358,300 reported home structure fires caused 2,520 civilian deaths per year.  During the five year period of 2010-2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 358,300 home structure fires per year.  These fires caused an annual average of 2,520 civilian deaths, 12,720 civilian fire injuries, and $6.7 billion in direct property damage.  Home fires accounted for three-quarters (74%) of all reported structure fires, 93% of civilian structure fire deaths, 87% of the civilian structure fire injuries, and more than two-thirds (69% of direct structure fire property loss.

 

During 2010-2014, roughly one of every 338 households per year had a reported home fire.  On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day.

 

The full report is now available for download.

As an NFPA staff liaison, I help NFPA members with their code questions. I often get questions about NFPA construction types found in NFPA 5000, NFPA 101, and NFPA 220 - What do they mean? What do the numbers in parenthesis represent? What does a Type II building look like?

 

NFPA codes and standards base many requirements on building construction type - number of stories, building square footage, etc. There are 10 construction types that NFPA defines. Use this quick visual guide to help you decipher the NFPA 5000 construction types. In this visual, I provide a simple explanation using construction Type III (211) as an example.

Wow, it's almost Halloween.  Where does the time go?  As we wrap up the pumpkin season, and before heading into the 'holiday season', which brings a whole new set of Fire Code challenges (Christmas trees, candles, snow, eek!), here is a summary of the issues addressed by NFPA 1, Fire Code, before one last weekend of fall festivities.  It seems like just in my local area there are tons and tons of events to attend, this weekend alone.  Understanding how the Code applies to these events helps ensure a safe and fun time to everyone involved.

 

 

Corn Mazes:

One might not think of a corn maze as somewhere with a great fire safety risk.  However, crop mazes pose unique fire safety problems due to their configuration (confusing paths and lack of marked egress) and the inherent combustibility of the maze materials.

 

Haunted Houses:

Haunted houses use special effects, scenery, props, and audio and visual distractions that may cause egress paths to become not obvious.  In haunted houses in particular, the presence of combustible materials and special scenery can also contribute to the fuel load should a fire occur.  Because of this, the Code requirements are purposely strict to in hopes of avoiding a disastrous fire event.

 

Concession Stands:

Concession booths are a particular concern at carnivals, harvest festivals and fairs.  Many contain flammable liquids, commercial cooking equipment, and are producing grease laden vapors.  Often times concession stands are crammed into one small pedestrian area, concentrating the potential hazard into a confined, high-traffic zone.

 

Other considerations:

Fire Department Access - the presence of food trucks, mobile cooking stands, concession stands, parking areas, hayrides, and other events cannot block the roads and areas designated for fire department access.

 

Permits - Table 1.12.8(a) summarizes those activities and processes that require permits.  Both fire code officials and those involved in the planning of events must be aware of permitting requirements.

 

Open Flames, Candles, Open Fires, and Incinerators - The AHJ has the authority to prohibit any or all
open flames, candles, and open, recreational, and cooking fires or other sources of ignition, or establish special regulations on the use of any form of fire or smoking material where circumstances make such conditions hazardous.

 

Have a safe and Happy Halloween weekend!

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) announced today the recipients of its 2016 Leadership and Service Awards. Recipients have been recognized for their significant contributions to national and international standardization activities, as well as an ongoing commitment to their industry, their nation, and the enhancement of the global voluntary consensus standards system. ANSI will honor these 18 distinguished award recipients during an October 26 ceremony held in conjunction with World Standards Week 2016 in Washington DC.

 

James Pauley, our very own president and CEO received the George S. Wham Leadership Medal, which honors an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the voluntary standardization community and provided long-term direction and visionary qualities in support of the ANSI Federation. We here at NFPA appreciate the honor bestowed onto Jim; thank you ANSI!

 

Congratulations to all recipients who were honored at this year's Leadership & Service Awards!

 

 

Halloween is fast-approaching. It won’t be long until the children are wearing costumes and trick-or-treating for candy. Although this holiday is best known for fun, festivities and games, there are hidden fire hazards on Halloween, too, and we want to make sure and remind everyone about some simple Halloween safety tips to help avoid those hazards. 

 

NFPA statistics show that from 2009-2013, an average of 860 home structure fires per year began with decorations. Almost half (45%) of these fires were tied to decorations being too close to some type of heat source, such as a candle. A fire can start when candles are too close to decorations or when long, trailing costumes come into contact with candles.

 

Read our full press release for more information Halloween fire dangers as well as a list of safety tips

A special bonus issue of NFPA Journal introduces readers to the people and organizations that have been instrumental in furthering home sprinkler usage across the country over the last 20 years.


With its theme of “Final Frontier: The challenge, success, and promise of the home fire sprinkler,” this commemorative edition of the magazine is tied to the 20th anniversary of the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition (HFSC). The issue charts the major HFSC milestones associated with sprinkler education; provides readers with a comprehensive list of resources in community sprinkler adoption efforts; outlines the green benefits of installing home fire sprinklers; and includes a detailed look at how home sprinklers impact fire safety.


One of the lead stories explores the history and life-saving potential of home fire sprinklers, and addresses the challenges and successes of adopting sprinkler requirements in new, one-and two-family homes.


Find out more about this special issue by reading our full press release. Read the digital version of the special October 2016 home sprinkler issue using the NFPA Journal mobile app

Free tool navigate new CMS requirements for emergency preparedness

 

Following on the heels of the adoption of the 2012 editions of NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code and NFPA 101 Life Safety Code this past May, the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued another important regulation involving NFPA codes and standards.  

 

The Emergency Preparedness Requirements for Medicare and Medicaid Participating Providers and Suppliers final rule, issued in September, imposes a set of new requirements to be considered for various types of entities that participate in Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement programs.  The new regulation impacts 17 organizations as part of their Condition of Participation (CoP) status related to their reimbursement level. The rule requires providers to develop a risk assessment based upon at all hazards disaster or emergency scenario with a planning component that will help them deal with the circumstance. The rule requires the development of an emergency plan, policy and procedure, communication plan, as well as a method to train staff and evaluate facilities about the plan. It also specifies additional criteria for emergency and standby power requirements for certain health care occupancies.

 

The genesis of these new requirements is based on catastrophic events such as the September 11 terrorist attacks, Hurricane Katrina and Super Storm Sandy, among other natural hazards. These types of events as well as the recent pandemic outbreaks can challenge a provider’s ability to carry out its day-to-day operations. Maintaining the operation of the facility or service, developing alternative locations for patients to receive treatment or temporarily closing a facility until the imminent danger has passed, will be among the decisions providers will have to define.

 

Because the rule is around 185 pages, NFPA has prepared a free, downloadable resource (matrix) to help users find the information they need specific to their facility quickly and easily. How does it work? The table lists the 17 provider types in the first column and connects them to the six main subjects covered in the final rule. By clicking on any of the YES boxes in the matrix, you’ll be taken directly to the language for your provider type in the regulation.

 

This new requirements goes into effect this year on November 15 and the implementation date is one year later – November 15, 2017. Check out NFPA’s CMS resource page to download the matrix and get important information about the emergency preparedness rule. You can find additional NFPA resources in support of the CMS regulations on our NFPA Resources for CMS Requirements webpage.

 

This is a continuation of my last blog which covered the burden of being protected against the first electrical hazard (shock) addressed by NFPA 70E®. The second hazard addressed is an arc-flash. Essentially an arc-flash causes a burn injury. If you look at medical records, insurance reports, etc. that provide data on electric burn injuries you will find that they are very traumatic, very expensive, have an extremely long recovery time and are difficult to survive when severe.  A dropped tool, a loose connection, and a slip of the hand have all initiated an arc-flash. Many workers who decided to roll the dice were sure that it would not happen to them when they started the task or took a shortcut. Others could not comment because they bet their life and lost. NFPA 70E requirements are to protect you from this type of injury. An arc-flash can occur in less time than it takes to blink your eye. You will not avoid it. It is the final line of defense (arc-flash PPE) that NFPA 70E requires you to wear that will save your life.

The burden you must endure is wearing arc-rated PPE. It may make the task more difficult. It can get quite warm in a full arc-flash suit. Remember that if the electrical equipment was placed into an electrically safe work condition that this “burdensome” gear would be unnecessary when you are working on the equipment. Some of you may consider it to be a hassle to don all the required gear. The decision to skip wearing some of the gear entails deciding which part of your body may not be that important to you. If the incident energy is above 1.2 cal/cm2 you should plan on spending time in the hospital. Roll the dice. Live or die by the outcome.

There have been some great advancements in the materials, flexibility, weight, etc. of this gear. Selecting and actually wearing the appropriate PPE, as well as allowing sufficient time to safely perform a justified task, are steps that should not be overlooked. One thing that increases your odds of returning home after an incident is the protective equipment that NFPA 70E requires you to wear. Think about what this gear is intended to do. It is to protect you from a burn injury when a ball or wall of flame hits you. Can you reconcile the decision not to wear protective gear with your confidence that you will not become a statistic?

Working on energized electrical equipment is not a craps game. If it were it has some of the highest stakes. Your life can change or end in a split second. Don’t wager that an incident will never happen to you. Don’t let a toss of the dice determine if you will return home. Accidents happen. Unexpected things occur. Qualified people make mistakes. Don’t consider electrical safety to be a burden. By the nature of what is trying to be achieved, gear designed to protect you from an electrical injury will be more robust and require more to be worn than every day work clothes. This is especially true for higher energy or voltage levels. Remember to shut it off first. If that is impossible, the PPE requirements in NFPA 70E provide the best odds that you will return home when you perform justified energized electrical work.

Next time: The difference in establishing an electrically safe work condition and performing justified energized work.

As your partner in electrical safety, NFPA knows the importance of having the latest edition of NFPA 70: National Electrical Code. Now that the 2017 NEC is available, we’ve been working on a series of videos to help explain the changes to the code and the broad impact they will have across the industry.

 

Please join me for this latest video, a second in this series, as I talk through the broader changes that impact electrical installations in any type of occupancy. Some of these changes include revisions in Article 100 for electrical equipment that is considered to be “readily accessible,” the new distinction between “structure vs. electrical equipment,” and many more changes from the 2017 edition that you absolutely need to know.

 

The following is a video preview:


You can watch the full 30-minute video for free if you are logged into Xchange.

 

Haven't registered for Xchange yet? Look for the login link above to login or register for your free account on Xchange. Xchange is more than a blog; it's an online community that connects you with peers worldwide and directly with NFPA staff. Don’t miss out; get involved today!

Connecticut’s top fire service organizations joined us today at the South Fire District in Middletown to address a home fire in September that killed a six-year-old girl in a new home and inaction by state decision makers to provide a key safety feature in new homes.

 

Earlier this year, the six-year-old girl and her family moved into their Plainfield home. Had the home followed requirements found in all U.S. model building codes when it was built earlier this year, it should have included fire sprinklers. This technology can reduce the risk of dying in home fires by 80 percent.

 

However, Connecticut’s code-making body has decided not to adopt this requirement each time it has updated the state building code since 2010. Similarly, legislative bills that would have required fire sprinklers in new homes have been defeated with help from local fire sprinkler opponents. These opponents, mainly the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut, claim this technology is burdensome, not necessary, and expensive—all myths countered by solid research.

 

Read more about today's event through our full press release. For more information on the Connecticut Fire Sprinkler Coalition, visit FireSprinklerInitiative.org/Connecticut.

 

Sign up now to hear the Smart Fire Fighting keynote presentation live-streamed from the First Responder Forum on Monday, November 7, 2016 from 10:15-11:15 am ET.

 

The loss of civilian and first responder lives, property and economic stability can be significantly reduced by exploiting new smart fire fighting opportunities. New technology, including cyber-physical systems, innovative building controls, intuitive fire fighting equipment, and smart apparatus are revolutionizing emergency response. Learn more about collecting data from global sensors, processing the information centrally and utilizing the results locally. Smart fire fighting can help save lives and decrease injuries, improve firefighter occupational health and safety, and enhance operational, fire prevention and protection efficiency.

 

This presentation, by Casey Grant of the Fire Protection Research Foundation, will be live-streamed from NFPA’s Responder Forum. The Forum brings together representatives from 13 key fire organizations, subject matter experts, industry leaders, and NFPA staff to address emerging issues. The Fire Fighter of the Future, is a one-hour presentation on smart fire fighting, which will be live-streamed from NFPA's annual think tank on emerging issues in fire service. Watch this video of highlights from the 2015 First Responder Forum.

 

 

Space is limited. Register now to view this presentation on Monday, November 7 from 10:15 -11:15 ET.

NFPA 70

The following proposed Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) for NFPA 70, National Electrical Code®, is being published for public review and comment:

Anyone may submit a comment on this proposed TIA by the December 22, 2016 closing date. Along with your comment, please identify the log number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

The outdoor storage of forest products (lumber) involves many arrangements of storage, from retail lumber outlets to the large cold decks found at wood processing facilities. Storage also involves a wide range of products, from wood chips and plywood to large tree logs for logging operations. If any of these types of storage goes unchecked, a fire could mean large product losses for the company and vast amounts of resources expended by the responding fire department.

 

Therefore, the requirements in Chapter 31 of NFPA 1, Fire Code,  for the outdoor storage of forest products are aimed at minimizing the likelihood of fire, controlling a fire if one occurs, and ensuring rapid fire department access to the site should a fire occur. The fire department, AHJs, and users should be familiar with the site and pre-plan for fire incidents involving various scenarios.

 

 

In addition to the general provisions in Section 31.3.2 which are applicable, Section 31.3.3 provides requirements specific to the outdoor storage of lumber products at retail and wholesale storage yards.  This includes lumber yards open to the public (think a local Lowe's, Home Depot, ProBuild) or and those that are private and offer wholesale services.

 

One of the most important requirements for lumber yards is to provide a positive fire prevention program.  The fire hazard potential inherent in lumber storage operations with large quantities of combustible materials shall be addressed with this program under the direct supervision of upper level management.  The program will include:

  • Selection, design, and arrangement of storage yard areas and materials-handling equipment based upon proven fire prevention and protection principles
  • Means for early fire detection, transmission of alarm, and fire extinguishment
  • Fire department access roads to separate large stacks and provide access for effective fire-fighting operations
  • Separation of yard storage from yard buildings and other exposing properties
  • Effective fire prevention maintenance program, including regular yard inspections by trained personnel

 

The arrangement of the lumber stacks is also a critical for the safety of these facilities.  The lumber stacks, if not arranged properly, can inhibit fire department access, can increase the speed of fire spread throughout the stacks or to adjacent structures or can cause early collapse during a fire.  Some additional requirements for lumber stacks and open yard storage are as follows:

  • Lumber stacks must be on stable ground.
  • Stacking shall be stable and in an orderly and regular manner.  A collapse of storage stacks could obstruct access roads or contribute to fire spread.
  • The height of stacks cannot exceed 20 ft. Storage stacks taller than 20 ft (6 m) can significantly impede handheld hose stream operations by fire suppression personnel.
  • Fire department access roads must be spaced so that a grid system of not more than 50 ft × 150 ft (15 m × 46m) is produced. Storage stacks wider than 50 ft × 150 ft (15 m × 46 m) can also significantly impede handheld hose stream operations by fire suppression personnel.
  • The stack limits must be marked by boundary posts or painted boundary limits that indicate stacking limits.
  • Open yard stacking shall be located with not less than 15 ft (4.6 m) clear space to buildings and to adjacent property lines. Automatic sprinkler protection in accordance with NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, should be considered for all buildings that might constitute an exposure to outside lumber storage.

 

The 2018 edition of NFPA 1 will include a new section for protection requirements for the outdoor storage of wood pallets and pallets listed as equivalent to wood as these facilities also create a number of challenges for the fire department suppression efforts and fire department access, and with the presence of tens of thousands of combustible pallets, can be the location for a devastating and costly fire should the proper precautions not be put in place.

The intention is that the draft will be presented to the Pro Qual Board late this year and then to the NFPA Standards Council in April, 2017 for entry into cycle for public input.

 

The meeting will be held Tuesday through Thursday, November 8-10, 2016 at:

NFPA Headquarters

1 Batterymarch Park

Quincy, MA 02169

Meeting Times: 8:00am to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern)

 

All technical committee meetings are open to the public.

 

   This committee has primary responsibility for documents related to the duties, requirements, competencies and professional qualifications required of Building Fire and Life Safety Directors.

 

   This committee also has primary responsibility for the establishment of minimum requirements for emergency action plans addressing all-hazard emergencies within occupied structures having an occupant load of greater than 500.

 

   This committee shall not have responsibility of such qualifications, roles, responsibilities, or emergency action plans within industrial occupancies.

It will be held on Monday, November 7, 2016 at:

NFPA Headquarters

1 Batterymarch Park

Quincy, MA 02169

Meeting Time: 8:00am to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern)

 

All technical committee meetings are open to the public.

 

NFPA 88A covers the construction and protection of, as well as the control of hazards in, open and enclosed parking structures. The purpose of this standard is to provide minimum fire protection standards for parking structures

 

Thirty (30) public inputs have been filed for NFPA 88A. You can see them all by clicking on the links below:

NFPA 88A                           

 

 

   General advice about major disasters says each of us will very likely need to take care of ourselves for the first 24 to 72 hours. The former chair of the National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Disability Access and Review Committee said "Every one of us should be prepared to take some responsibility for our own safety regardless of our circumstances."

 

   To that end, the NFPA has created the Emergency Evacuation Planning Guide for People with Disabilities which provides assistance to people with disabilities, their employers, building owners and managers, and others as they develop emergency evacuation plans that integrate the needs of people with disabilities. This guidance can be used in all buildings, whether old or new.

 

   This webinar will review the 2nd edition of this Planning Guide and provide major topics and updated materials.

 

Learning objectives:

  • Identify the specific functions that are part of a process of evacuating a building and how to build a successful plan.

 

Presenter:

Allan Fraser is the Senior Building Code Specialist on the National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) staff. Before joining NFPA, he had been the Building Commissioner in 5 different Massachusetts municipalities over twenty seven years. He is a Certified Building Official and a Certified Professional Code Administrator. He staff's NFPA's Disability Access Review and Advisory Committee. He represents NFPA on a number of committees of other standards developers.

 

Click here to register!

Learn a proven process for sprinkler system plans review and hydraulic calcs review in just one day with Automatic Sprinkler Systems Plans Review.

 

Join us in Warren, New Jersey on Friday, December 2, 2016 and earn  .7 CEUs. This unique learning opportunity is located just an hour outside of New York City! Space is limited so save your seat now!

 

Hosted by an NFPA expert with extensive experience in sprinkler system design and plans review, this one-day course based on the 2016 NFPA 13: Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems covers submittal requirements including regulatory rules, blueprint reading skills, and sprinkler specifications. You'll return to work with a proven multi-step process for reviewing sprinkler system plans and hydraulic calculations that can help you save time and work competently to avoid costly, potentially dangerous errors and omissions.

 

This class is vital for anyone responsible for reviewing or approving plans, as well as for engineers or designers who need to ensure sprinkler system plans are ready for submission to AHJs. Hands-on exercises solidify new knowledge.

 

Upon completion of this course you should be able to:

  • Identify the regulatory requirements for plans and calculations submittals
  • Review a plan review checklist and basis of design
  • Identify basic symbology and nomenclature for blueprints
  • Recognize the organization of plans and specifications
  • Employ an eight-step process for hydraulic calculations review
  • Employ an eight-step process for sprinkler plans review

 

Learn more about this special training opportunity right outside of NYC! Automatic Sprinkler Plans Review is scheduled for Friday, December 2, 2016 in Warren, New Jersey.

 

NFPA provides training on codes and standards through online training, hands-on training, classroom training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more. 

Research Foundation logoThe Fire Protection Research Foundation recently announced winners of the 2015 William M. Carey and Ronald K. Mengel awards. The award winners were selected by participants at the Foundation’s 2016 Suppression, Detection and Signaling Research and Applications Symposium (SUPDET). Recipients will receive their awards at the 2017 SUPDET Symposium, September 12-14, in College Park, Maryland.

 

Christina Francis won the 2016 William M. Carey Award for her outstanding paper entitled, “New Technology for Sprinklered High-Challenge Warehouses.” The award recognizes the best suppression presentation, as voted by attendees of SUPDET. 

 

Joseph Fleming, deputy fire chief for the Boston Fire Department, and Vytenis Babrauskas, of Fire Science and Technology Inc., won the 2016 Ronald K. Mengel Award for their exceptional paper entitled, “Improving Data Collection of Smoke Alarms in Fires.” The award recognizes the best detection presentation, as declared by SUPDET Symposium participants.

 

For more information on these awards and this year's winners, please read the full press release

Do your responsibilities involve the inspection, testing, or maintenance of water-based fire protection systems?

 

The 2017 edition of NFPA 25: Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems will soon be available and to help you quickly get a grasp of the information, NFPA is introducing a 1-day classroom training that includes the code book to take home with you. Find out more now. This training will be offered in two locations:

 

  • Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington
  • Thursday, December 15, 2016 in Orlando, Florida

 

Even the best-designed sprinkler system can fail if it's not properly maintained. Gain a fundamental understanding of how the new edition of NFPA 25: Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems works to ensure systems are ready for action.

 

This new, 1-day NFPA training uses collaborative discussion and job-based activities to explain inspection and testing rules for sprinkler system components, signs of corrosion, managing impairments, the owner's responsibilities for compliance, and ITM task frequencies.Upon completion you should be able to:

 

  • Explain the scope and purpose of NFPA 25, and its interaction with related standards
  • Explain the process for managing system impairments
  • Identify key inspection points including sprinklers, piping, hangers, fire pumps, and valves
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of various stakeholders including the owner, facility manager, service provider, insurance representative, and AHJ

 

Register now.

 

Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year. We also offer online training, hands-on training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more. 

NFPA Responder ForumLast fall, NFPA sponsored its inaugural Responder Forum in Indianapolis. Using information that was shared at the Forum, as well as follow up research that Forum attendees conducted in the ensuing months, three whitepapers were developed so that others can learn about three emerging topics:

 

  • Unmanned Aerial Systems
  • Data and the Fire Service
  • Civil Unrest

 

The topic of SMART Firefighting/Unmanned Aerial Systems was explored by one work group with a focus on the challenges that agencies face in deploying this technology. Another team looked at Data in the Fire Service and recommended ways to improve the collection, analysis and use of data. A third group examined the Fire Service Response to Civil Unrest, and assisted in the development of a sample standard operating procedure that was recently included in a white paper endorsed by the Urban Fire Forum. These three white papers and SOP serve as a record of Responder Forum discussions and are available for use by NFPA technical committees and others.

 

The NFPA Responder Forum brings together representatives from 13 key fire organizations, subject matter experts, industry leaders, and NFPA staff to address emerging issues. It was established to help build a bridge from research into practice by highlighting new technologies that the fire service must understand. Forum discussions inform the fire service community, research efforts, and NFPA codes and standards – and encourage forward-thinking among different fire disciplines.

 

The 2016 Forum will take place November 7-9 in Charlotte, North Carolina. On November 7, at 10:15 AM (EST), Casey Grant of the Fire Protection Research Foundation will present, The Future Firefighter,  a one-hour presentation on smart firefighting, which will be live-streamed. Register here to view the live-stream.

 

Learn how the Responder Forum is Impacting the Future of the Fire Service . The three white papers and more information on the Responder Forum can be found here. To discuss first responder ideas and issues, please contact me at kwillette@nfpa.org.

NFPA instructors will be in the "Emerald City" of Seattle, Washington November 7-11, 2016 teaching five NFPA classes at the Courtyard Seattle Downtown/Pioneer Square. The hotel is located in what is known as Seattle's first neighborhood and is a short walk from the Central Link light rail system, Pike Place Market, CenturyLink Field and SafeCo Field.

 

Registration is open for the following classes:

 

November 7-9, 2016

 

NFPA 13: Installation of Sprinkler Systems (2016)

 

NFPA 72®: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code (2016)

 

NFPA 70®: National Electrical Code® (NEC®) (2017) Essentials

 

November 10, 2016

 

NFPA 25, Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems (2017)

 

November 10-11, 2016

 

NFPA 70E®: Electrical Safety in the Workplace (2015)

 

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Check out Visit Seattle for the latest info on what's going on in and around the city when you're not in class.

 

Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year - pick the locations and courses that work for you. We also offer online training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more.

CSITMS-FM logo-rgb.jpgThe NFPA Certified Sprinkler ITM Specialist (CSITMS) for Facility Managers program was created after extensive market research was conducted with facility managers from a wide range of industries. The research indicated a strong desire to have a credential that highlights their knowledge of the many challenges associated with a proper inspection, testing, and maintenance program for water-based fire protection systems, and how to keep their facilities in compliance with the 2014 edition of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-based Fire Protection Systems.

 

To earn your CSITMS for Facility Managers, complete the application and pass the online exam. Earning this professional certification indicates your:

  • Competence with inspection, testing and maintenance of water-based fire protection systems, and how to keep facilities in compliance
  • Proficiency in the use of NFPA 25
  • Professionalism
  • Dedication to personal professional development

 

The CSITMS exam is a computer-based three-hour open-book examination, containing 100 multiple-choice questions. The exam is based on the 2014 edition of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-based Fire Protection Systems and is designed to evaluate the candidate’s knowledge of ITM principles and code application skills. NFPA 25  is the only reference source that may be present during the examination.

 

For more information about CSITMS go to: nfpa.org/csitms or contact NFPA Certification Department, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 Tel: +1 617 984-7509; Fax: +1 617 984-7127; email: csitmsfm@nfpa.org

NFPA is constantly developing new training programs to fit your needs. The NFPA Training Department is working with individual states to gain approval for NFPA CEUs for your state licensure renewal.

 

NFPA 70 and NFPA 70E courses may be applicable to the CEU requirements for your state licensure renewal. Currently, electrical courses are available for CO, FL, GA, KY, MN, NM, NC, OK, TX, UT, and WI with more in the works. For more information go to: nfpa.org/slp or click on each individual state for the applicable programs.

 

ColoradoFloridaGeorgia KentuckyMinnesotaNew MexicoNorth CarolinaOklahomaTexasUtah Wisconsin

 

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CEPSS-FM-logo-rgb.jpgThe NFPA Certified Emergency Power Systems Specialist (CEPSS) for Facility Managers program was created after extensive market research was conducted with facility managers from a wide range of industries. The research indicated a strong desire to have a credential that highlights their knowledge of the many challenges associated with emergency and standby power, as well as stored electrical energy emergency and standby power systems, and how to keep their facilities in compliance with the 2016 editions of NFPA 110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, and NFPA 111, Standard on Stored Electrical Energy Emergency and Standby Power Systems.

 

Paul Dunphy, Electrical Inspector and Compliance Coordinator for Harvard University was involved in the development of the certification. He states, “It is critical to life safety that a facility manager understands the operation and maintenance requirements of generator systems. This certification helps demonstrate your knowledge of critical building life safety systems and their role in overall building operations.”

 

To earn your CEPSS for Facility Managers, complete the application and pass the online exam. Earning this professional certification indicates your:

  • Competence with both emergency and standby power and stored electrical energy emergency and standby power systems
  • Proficiency in the use of NFPA 110 and NFPA 111
  • Professionalism
  • Dedication to personal professional development

 

The CEPSS exam is a computer-based three-hour open-book examination, containing 100 multiple-choice questions. The exam is based on the 2016 editions of NFPA 110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, and NFPA 111, Standard on Stored Electrical Energy Emergency and Standby Power Systems and is designed to evaluate the candidate’s knowledge of emergency power supply systems principles and code application skills. These are the only reference sources that may be present during the examination.

 

For more information about CEPSS go to: nfpa.org/cepss or contact NFPA Certification Department, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 Tel: +1 617 984-7509; Fax: +1 617 984-7127; email: cepssfm@nfpa.org

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NFPA is looking for CFI-I, CFI-II, and CFPE certification holders interested in volunteering to serve on a Certification Advisory Group (CAG).

 

Purpose: to assist NFPA's certification department with ongoing projects, such as, writing exam questions, determining exam passing scores, and validating exam content and weighting.

 

Commitment: renewable 12 month terms, with an estimated 4-8 hours of work per month

 

Benefits: earn points towards recertification, grow your professional network, enhance your resume

 

Qualifications: must be a current NFPA CFI-I, CFI-II, or CFPE certification holder and have solid experience navigating through the related NFPA documents and applying their requirements

 

Important note: appointment to a CAG is at the discretion of NFPA and is based solely on applicant qualifications, keeping a balance of interests, and maintaining the group at a manageable size. CAG members can't be involved in developing or delivering training that is related to a CFI-I, CFI-II, or CFPE certification program (i.e. exam prep). Members will be required to sign a non-disclosure agreement if accepted to a CAG.

 

If you are interested in volunteering for one of the above CAGs, and would like more information, please contact me at eholden@nfpa.org.

NFPA instructors will be in Dallas October 24-28 teaching four NFPA classes at the Crowne Plaza Hotel Dallas Downtown. If you're familiar with the area, the location is right in the heart of Dallas (the nearest subway station is the DART West End Station). And the Crowne Plaza is just 3 blocks away from the Main Street entertainment District and 4 blocks away from the The AT&T Performing Arts Center.

 

Registration is open for the following classes:

 

October 24-26, 2016

 

NFPA 13: Installation of Sprinkler Systems (2016)

 

NFPA 72®: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code (2016)

 

NFPA 70®: National Electrical Code® (NEC®) (2017) Essentials

 

October 27-28, 2016

 

NFPA 70E®: Electrical Safety in the Workplace (2015)

 

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Visit the Dallas Convention and Visitor's Bureau for the latest info on what's going on in the city and things to do when you're not in class.

 

Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year - pick the locations and courses that work for you. We also offer online training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more.

jpolito

NFPA Training in Saudi Arabia

Posted by jpolito Employee Oct 14, 2016

Jubail Industrial College (JIC) signed a Training Agreement with National Fire Protection Association Inc. (NFPA), a Massachusetts Not-for-Profit Corporation with offices at 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA, USA 02169-7471 to deliver 5 day NFPA Code Seminars, and 5 day NFPA Certification Seminars.

 

NFPA is responsible for 380 fire codes and standards that are designed to minimize the risk and effects of fire by establishing criteria for building, processing, design, service, and installation in the United States, as well as many other countries. Its more than 200 technical code- and standard- development committees have over 6,000 volunteer seats.

 

The training agreement includes offering NFPA codes and standards such as:

  • NFPA 1 – National Fire Code Seminar Program & Exam
  • NFPA 13 – National Standard Installation of Sprinkler System Seminar Program & Exam
  • NFPA 20 – National Standard for the installation of stationary pump for fire protection & NFPA 25 – National standard for the inspection, testing and maintenance of water-based fire protection system
  • NFPA 72 – National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code Seminar Program& Exam
  • NFPA 101 – National Life Safety Codes

 

NFPA Certification programs include:

  • NFPA CFI I – Certified Fire Inspector 1 Program & Examination
  • NFPA CF II – Certified Fire Inspector 2 Program and Examination
  • NFPA CFPS – Certified Fire Protection Specialist Program and Examination
  • NFPA CFPE – Certified Fire Plan Examiner

 

These Seminars will increase the understanding, application and proper use of NFPA codes and certification programs.  Training will be interactive and results-oriented, providing the knowledge necessary to ensure safety based upon the provisions of the code.  Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) will be awarded for successful completion each day of the workshop. Each seminar for NFPA codes and standards will include a Certificate of Educational Achievement. For NFPA certification programs, professional certifications will be issued to candidates who will successfully pass certification exam.

The Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) is the ultimate enforcing body and has full responsibility of determining if the Code is being applied correctly.  The Code is administered and enforce by the AHJ designated by the governing authority.  NFPA 1 might be enforced by different agencies in different jurisdictions. Depending on how the Code is adopted, enforcement responsibilities might be divided between state and local agencies or between different agencies at either the state or local level. If the enforcement responsibility is divided, each agency must be aware of the specific portions of NFPA 1 for

which it has enforcement responsibility and must understand the source from which it obtains its authority to enforce those portions.

 

 

 

Chapter 1 of NFPA 1 addresses the administrative and enforcement requirements of the Code. It covers the scope, purpose, and application of the Code. The authority and enforcement power given to the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) are also covered. Included in the responsibilities of the AHJ are to determine violations of the Code and serve notice of the violations as well as determine the required penalty.

 

So what happens when a facility violates the applicable requirements from NFPA 1? Whenever the Authority Having Jurisdiction determines violations of this Code, a written notice must be issued to confirm the violations. Any order or notice of violation issued is required to be served upon the owner, operator, occupant, registered agent, or other person responsible for the condition or violation by one of the following means:

(1) Personal service

(2) Mail to last known address of the owner, operator, or registered agent

 

The mutilation, destruction, or removal of a posted order or violation notice without authorization by the AHJ is considered a separate violation of this Code and punishable by the penalties established by the AHJ.

 

Any person who fails to comply with the provisions of this Code, fails to carry out an order made as stated in the Code, or violates any condition attached to a permit, approval, or certificate is subject to the penalties established by the AHJ.  Per NFPA 1, 2015 edition, where the AHJ establishes a separate penalty schedule, violations of this Code are subject to a $250.00 penalty.

 

**New for the 2018 edition of NFPA 1 violations of this Code will be subject to a $100.00 penalty per day for each violation.**

 

Failure to comply with the time limits of an order or notice of violation issued by the AHJ will result in each day that the violation continues being regarded as a separate offense and will be subject to a separate penalty.

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In honor of Fire Prevention Week, our Throwback Thursday post is the original Sparky the Fire Dog observing the most widely used illustration of himself at the time, circa 1956.

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Are you a craps player? You toss the dice and get a random outcome. Some outcomes have better odds of occurring than others. Sometimes it pays and sometimes you roll craps. Think of what you do at work. Are you rolling the dice to determine if you will be going home at the end of the day? Some of you consider the requirements in NFPA 70E® to be a burden especially if you are the one performing the energized work. NFPA 70E is intended to keep you reasonably safe from an electrical injury. The primary method which is to not have you exposed to electrical hazards in the first place. As the worker, think about what NFPA 70E requires of you.  It requires that you be able to perform a task on the equipment in a safe manner from the hazards you will be justifiably exposed to. I hope that working safely so that you can return home at the end of the day is not a burden.

 

What does NFPA 70E require for any scheduled electrical work? If you didn’t answer that the equipment be placed into an electrically safe work condition (ESWC) please look into what that means. There is no electrical hazard when equipment is in an ESWC. You will not be harmed by electrical energy. You can wear whatever you choose. Wouldn’t you be more comfortable wearing a t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops? (Note that this only applies to the electrical hazard.) Is it a burden to ask why the assigned task must be done while energized? Management’s or your own decision to have you perform energized electrical work is what burdens you to wear more gear. Is it a burden to find out why you are being put in harm’s way? If your employer is following federal regulations and NFPA 70E requirements there are only three justifiable reasons to expose you to risk of an electrical injury. These are greater hazard, greater risk and infeasibility. If revenue (in any form) is the improper justification for the energized work, your safety has been given a monetary value. I hope it is a high one since that will be your wager when the dice are thrown.

 

Assuming that energized electrical work is justified, what are the hazards that NFPA 70E is written to protect you from? Currently, it is to protect you from two hazards. The first is electric shock. During a shock, electrical current may travel hand to hand or hand to foot. Sometimes it is hand to head, chest, back or buttocks. When an electrical current is passing through your body you are rolling the dice. If it takes a critical path, hits at just the right cycle of the heartbeat sequence, lasts just a little too long, is on a high line circuit rather than low line, or enters through a cut in the skin that shock could become an electrocution. The level could also be high enough so that it just doesn’t matter what the conditions are or the path it takes. Electrocution is just a stone’s throw away rom an electrical shock. Electrocution has occurred at 120 volts. To my knowledge no one has ever survived an electrocution (check the definition). When you ignore NFPA 70E requirements for shock protection you are betting your life that you will only get a shock (this time).

 

Here are some generally accepted thresholds for a 60 Hz current passing through a 150 pound, healthy male:  Painful shock – 9 mA; Let-go threshold (start) – 16 mA; Impaired breathing and loss of muscle control – 23 mA; Possible ventricular fibrillation – 100 mA (3 second shock); Heart muscle failure – 500 mA, Burnt tissue and organs – 1500 mA.  The resistance of dry, undamaged, outer layer of skin ranges between 1,000-100,000 ohms. A typical human body model uses 500 ohms per limb and 100 ohms for the core.  Calculate the anticipated current levels at 120 volts. Are they higher than you thought? You probably perform energized work on 208 volt or higher systems. What do the numbers come to for your justified, energized work environment? The circuit current limiting device is most likely rated at least 20 amperes. Do you still want to gamble that you will not accidentally make contact?

 

My father was an old school electrician who was taught to test by touch and work bare-handed. One day he got “hung up”. Lucky for him, a co-worker realized that he had not moved for what seemed to be a long time. By my father’s account being helpless while feeling a painful, burning sensation made it seem like an eternity. He tells it that the co-worker could see it in his eyes that something was wrong. There was no other communication method for him. That co-worker most likely saved my father’s life. What would have happened if that co-worker did not notice? My father’s body could have stayed there until he went unconscious and fell away. He might have silently agonized until the electrical system opened the circuit for some other reason. He may not have survived. Almost every electrical worker knows someone who has rolled the dice and luckily only experienced a shock if they themselves did not. Several of you know someone who tossed the dice and lost. Hopefully, the next generation of electrical workers will not have the same experience.

 

So, the burden that you perceive to be put upon you by NFPA 70E are the requirements intended to save your life. You have to use tools anyway so why not use properly rated, undamaged, insulated tools? When you schedule the work you should know what is necessary to protect you from shock hazards for the specific task. You should not be modifying the energized electrical work permit in the field. It may be difficult to perform some tasks while wearing gloves so that must be one of your perceived burdens. Gloves are not the only method that can limit the risk of a shock injury but if they are necessary use them. The additional protection would not be necessary if the equipment were in an ESWC as primarily required. There should be no need to return to the truck to get the correct tool for a properly scheduled task but if that trip is necessary it should be taken rather than rolling the dice once again.

 

Next time: The burden of being protected (Part II).

The updated 2016 edition of the NFPA Glossary of Terms (GOT) has been published and is available for FREE online. Visit www.nfpa.org/got to download your copy.

 

The GOT is a list of the defined terms in all of NFPA's published codes, standards, guides and recommended practices. Over 15,000 terms are listed alphabetically and assembled into a free PDF available on the NFPA website. The document is used in a number of ways. It helps NFPA Technical Committees who are looking to define new terms or compare existing terms. It also helps members of the public who are interested in learning about how NFPA documents define specific terms. The GOT contains the following details about each term:

 

Term: The word being defined.

Definition:The description of the term.

Document (Edition): Where the term and definition are found (document #) and the edition year of that document.

Document Defining Same Term: A list of all documents that also define the same term.

Document Using Same Definition: A list of all documents that also define the same term in the exact same way.

 

See the figure below for an example of how the GOT is organized. The term "Barrel" is defined in 3 documents- NFPA 1, 30, and 80.  NFPA 1 and NFPA 30 both define the term in the exact same way. The first 2 definitions refer to a unit of volume while the last  definition, from NFPA 80, refers to a rolling steel door component.To learn more about any of the documents defining a term, visit the NFPA Document Information Pages- www.nfpa.org/(insert doc #). For example, NFPA 80 can be found at www.nfpa.org/80.

 

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Here’s an article I wrote this summer, which speaks to the two fires that occurred at senior living facilities in California this week:

 

101-lifeSafetyCode.jpgOlder adults are more vulnerable to fires compared to the general population; at age 65, people are twice as likely to be killed or injured by fire. That's why it's important for older adults to carefully consider their living environments, and to make sure they're adequately protected from fire and related risks.

 

While it's often assumed that any residence for people ages 55 and older will include the fire and life safety provisions needed to maximize their safety, that's not necessarily the case.

 

Depending on how a senior living residence is categorized, it may or may not include the fire safety measures, designs and features that other senior living occupancies such as an assisted living facility incorporate. Anyone either currently living in or considering a move into a residence that is advertised as senior housing or otherwise caters to older adults needs to be aware of what safety measures are — or are not — in place, so they can make an informed decision about where they live.

 

The National Fire Protection Association developed NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, which serves as the most widely used source for strategies to protect people from fire and related hazards based on building construction and occupancy features.

 

While NFPA 101 must be used by facilities that fall under certain federal guidelines, buildings identified simply as senior housing have no obligation to follow NFPA 101 unless the code is adopted at the state or local level. Buildings that fall under the federal criteria include assisted living facilities, long-term care and nursing home facilities. Although individual states can and do adopt NFPA 101 for other types of occupancies, Nevada is not among them.

 

In a section of NFPA 101 called "Residential Board and Care," stringent requirements for assisted living facilities include the installation Of smoke alarm systems and fire sprinkler systems, as well as building construction features that ensure adequate means of egress in the event of a fire or other emergency. The building managers of assisted living facilities are also required to establish emergency evacuation plans and procedures for residents which are supervised by 24 hour on-site staff. Meanwhile, the residents themselves must be evaluated by qualified staff to determine whether or not they're capable of living in an assisted living facility.

 

However, occupancies referred to as "senior housing" or "senior apartments" oftentimes are simply apartment buildings whose only requirement is that residents are 55 years of age or older. They offer no fire safety provisions specific to the needs of older adults, and the occupancy owners and managers of these residences are not required to follow NFPA 101 unless state or local adoption of the code is in place. This puts older adults living in those residencies at increased fire risk.

 

Firefighters don't always have the ability to get multiple people, particularly those who are disabled or use medical equipment at home. This challenge is multiplied if the senior housing occupancy consists of multiple stories.

 

Fortunately, there are many steps people living in senior residences can take on their own to reduce their risk of fire. One should talk with the building manager to learn what, if any, fire protection systems are installed in the building, and to find out about emergency evacuation plans that may be in place. Buildings with multiple stories that are protected with automatic sprinkler systems will be inherently safer than buildings that have no similar protection.

 

Regardless of what features your building does or doesn't have, NFPA's Emergency Evacuation Planning Guide for People with Disabilities is a valuable resource that can be used for any specific situation. The Guide, addressing the main evacuation elements needed for the disabled community, can be easily applied to older adult communities and is available online for free. If a building manager doesn't have a plan in place, providing him or her with the guide will give them the information, guidance and resources needed to implement one.

 

For more information on fire safety, visit www.nfpa.org. For information specifically on fire safety for at-risk populations, visit www.nfpa.org/disability.

 

This article was originally published in the July issue of Health Care Quarterly/Las Vegas.

Congratulations to the Kirkville Fire Company, a volunteer fire department in Kirkville, NY - they're the winners of our first-ever "Get Ready for Your Close-Up" catalog contest! Along with being featured on the cover of next year's Fire Prevention Week catalog, photos and stories highlighting the Kirville Fire Company's year-round efforts will be included throughout. The catalog will be distributed to fire departments, safety advocates educators and other groups nationwide in May 2017. So get ready for your close-up, Kirville Fire Company!

 

Also, a tremendous thanks to First Alert, which is actively supporting the contest by donating 500 smoke alarms to the department.

College.JPGA recent 4-alarm fire, which broke out Labor Day Weekend in a student housing building at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Purchase College highlights the importance of requiring all college dormitories to have automatic fire sprinklers, according to a recent press release sent out by the leaders of the New York Fire Sprinkler Council, a division of the Mechanical Contractors Association of New York.

 

Eight different Westchester County fire departments were called in to extinguish the fire, which forced dozens of students to move to temporary housing. The dorm, located on campus on “K Street”, did not have fire sprinklers installed.

 

“Thankfully no one was injured in the SUNY Purchase fire, but this incident highlights the risks of placing students in campus housing without fire suppression systems.” said Tony Saporito, Executive Vice President of the Mechanical Contractors Association of New York, Inc. “Automatic fire sprinklers not only put out fires quickly, but statistics prove they save lives and property.”

 

Pending New York State legislation, introduced by Assemblyman Kevin Cahill (D-103, Ulster & Dutchess Counties), would require all SUNY and City University of New York (CUNY) campus dormitories to be retrofitted with fire-sprinklers (Assembly Bill #A1217). According to the release, there has never been any real urgency for the state to advance this public safety legislation first introduced in 2003, however, many in the fire services believe the need for action is long overdue.

 

Read the attached press release (below) for the full story. A more detailed look at the fire sprinkler efforts aimed at New York colleges can be found in a September 13 post written by my colleague, Fred Durso, communications manager for NFPA’s Fire Sprinkler Initiative.

 

As a reminder, NFPA, Campus Firewatch, the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the U.S. Fire Administration joined forces in May to launch the “See It Before You Sign It Campaign,” encouraging parents to take a more active role in helping their loved ones choose secure, fire-safe housing for the school year. This includes considering residences with fire sprinklers. For more, including resources, statistics, checklists, tips and videos, visit the Campus Firewatch webpage or by visiting www.nfpa.org/campus.

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I was at a State Fire Council Fire Prevention Committee meeting for the adoption of the 2015 NFPA 1, Fire Code, last week.  The group took a break and went to the Capitol where Governor Ige signed the 2016 proclamation for Fire Prevention Week.  The State Fire Council, comprised of the four county fire chiefs, was also in attendance, as were several other island chiefs and the State Forester.  What a great experience to see Fire Prevention Week officially recognized on the most remote islands in the world.

The Report of the Motions Committee addresses four Fall 2016 NFPA Standards with certified amending motions that may be presented at the NFPA Technical Meeting (Tech Session) in Boston, MA on June 4-7, 2017:

  • NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers
  • NFPA 285, Standard Fire Test Method for Evaluation of Fire Propagation Characteristics of Exterior Non-Load-Bearing Wall Assemblies Containing Combustible Components
  • NFPA 730, Guide for Premises Security
  • NFPA 1403Standard on Live Fire Training Evolutions

This Report also identifies a list of 32 additional standards that were determined by the Motions Committee to be Consent Standards and, therefore, will be forwarded to the NFPA Standards Council for balloting.  The final date to file an appeal on these Fall 2016 Consent Standards is November 1, 2016.  These documents are listed as follows:

 

NFPA 17, Standard for Dry Chemical Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 18, Standard on Wetting Agents
NFPA 18A, Standard on Water Additives for Fire Control and Vapor Mitigation
NFPA 36, Standard on Solvent Extraction Plants
NFPA 56, Standard for Fire and Explosion Prevention During Cleaning and Purging of Flammable Gas Piping Systems
NFPA 96, Standard on Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations
NFPA 225, Model Manufactured Home Installation Standard
NFPA 252, Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Door Assemblies
NFPA 257, Standard on Fire Test for Window and Glass Block Assemblies
NFPA 268, Standard Test Method for Determining Ignitibility of Exterior Wall Assemblies Using a Radiant Heat Energy Source
NFPA 269, Standard Test Method for Developing Toxic Potency Data for Use in Fire Hazard Modeling
NFPA 275, Standard Method of Fire Tests for the Evaluation of Thermal Barriers
NFPA 287, Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Flammability of Materials in Cleanrooms Using a Fire Propagation Apparatus (FPA)
NFPA 385, Standard for Tank Vehicles for Flammable and Combustible Liquids
NFPA 475, Recommended Practice for Responding to Hazardous Materials Incidents/Weapons of Mass Destruction
NFPA 501, Standard on Manufactured Housing
NFPA 550, Guide to the Fire Safety Concepts Tree 
NFPA 655, Standard for Prevention of Sulfur Fires and Explosions
NFPA 731, Standard for the Installation of Electronic Premises Security Systems
NFPA 909, Code for the Protection of Cultural Resource Properties - Museums, Libraries, and Places of Worship
NFPA 921, Guide for  Fire and Explosion Investigations
NFPA 1002, Standard for Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1006, Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1072, Standard for Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Emergency Response Personnel Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1150, Standard on Foam Chemicals for Fires in Class A Fuels
NFPA 1401, Recommended Practice for Fire Service Training Reports and Records
NFPA 1616, Standard on Mass Evacuation and Sheltering Program
NFPA 1670, Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents
NFPA 1911, Standard for the Inspection, Maintenance, Testing, and Retirement of In-Service Automotive Fire Apparatus
NFPA 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services
NFPA 1986, Standard on Respiratory Protection Equipment for Technical and Tactical Operations

 

The anticipated issuance date for these consent standards is November 11, 2016 with an effective date of December 1, 2016.

The October 2016 issue of NFPA News, our free monthly codes and standards newsletter, is now available.

 

NFPA_news.jpgIn this issue:

  • Comments sought on proposed Tentative Interim Amendments to NFPA 1616 and NFPA 1982
  • NFPA Technical Committee seeking users of tactical video equipment
  • Errata issued on NFPA 52, NFPA 61, and NFPA 70
  • NFPA Standards published with change indicators
  • Committees soliciting public input
  • Committees seeking members
  • Committee meetings calendar

 

Subscribe today! NFPA News is a free newsletter, and includes special announcements, notification of public input and comment closing dates, requests for comments, notices on the availability of Standards Council minutes, and other important news about NFPA’s standards development process.

 

Check out this new smoke alarm slideshow, which highlights key ways to ensure that smoke alarms are fully functioning in the home and will alert everyone in the event of a fire.

 

In support of Fire Prevention Week, feel free to share the slideshow on social media to remind people about the importance of working smoke alarms!

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This past Monday and Tuesday the NFPA 1 Technical Committee met in Milwaukee, WI for their Second Draft meeting.  The Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) was kind enough to provide beautiful meeting space for the committee.  Committee members made new connections with MSOE staff and MSOE faculty visited the meeting to experience the code development process in action.  A successful meeting was had by all!

 

A fire code encompasses many, many subjects which cover the full range of fire and life safety issues from fire protection systems and equipment and occupant safety in new and existing buildings to hazardous materials, flammable and combustible liquids, LP-Gas, and more.  This actions taken at the meeting were an accurate reflection of the broad scope of the Code as the committee acted on issues from fire department access, storage of materials, hazardous materials, food trucks, and marijuana.

 

Here is a recap of the results on major issues from the meeting:

  • New chapter on marijuana growing, processing and extraction facilities.  This chapter will address unique safety provisions for marijuana growing and processing facilities in new and existing buildings.
  • Reorganized Chapter 52 on Energy Storage Systems (titled Stationary Storage Battery Systems in previous editions) with requirements specific to Lead-Acid and Nickel-Cadmium Batteries and other requirements specific to additional battery technologies.  The rewrite of Chapter 52 reflects new and existing applications of energy storage systems.
  • New section on Outside Storage of Biomass Feedstock.
  • Required compliance with NFPA 56 for cleaning and purging activities for new and existing flammable gas piping found in electric generating plants and in industrial, institutional, and commercial applications.
  • Updated requirements for fire department access road dimensions including curb cuts, gradient, and widths.
  • Revised section 34.10.3 on outdoor storage to be specific to wood and wood composite pallets and listed pallets equivalent to wood and revised 34.10.4 for application specific to pallet manufacturing and pallet recycling facilities. Also included is a new section on the allowable size of pallet arrays based on fire department access. 
  • Updated extracted provisions in Chapter 40 from NFPA 654 to NFPA 652.
  • New section on mobile and temporary cooking operations updated from the First Draft with applicable extracted provisions from NFPA 58.
  • Hundreds of sections extracted from other NFPA codes and standards were updated to reflect the text from the newest editions of those documents.

*Please note that all results are subject to formal balloting by the Technical Committee.  The official results of the meeting including responses to public comments and second revisions, can be found in the Second Draft and Second Draft Report which will be available and posted at www.nfpa.org/1next no later than January 16, 2017.

catalog_cover_160x225.jpgNFPA helps you work successfully in an ever-changing environment. As codes and standards evolve, we provide new training opportunities designed to help you understand how requirements are applied in the real world. Here’s a look at what’s available, with more training programs at catalog.nfpa.org.

 

Download the NFPA Fall Training catalog PDF.

 

Safe Confined Space Entry and Work Training

 

On average every year in the U.S., 92 workers are killed while working in or adjacent to confined spaces. Enroll now for vital guidance on how NFPA 350: Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work helps you recognize, evaluate, and control confined space hazards.

 

 

2017 NEC® Training

 

NFPA 70: National Electrical Code is one of the most recognized documents. Choose from more options than ever before! 2017 NEC Essentials Classroom Training provides expert instruction in a city near you. Learn at your own pace with the 2017 NEC Online Training Series. Or take the new NEC Navigator Online Training to get an essential grounding in today’s Code.

 

 

2012 NFPA 101 and NFPA 99 Training

 

NFPA training helps you understand the impact of the recent CMS adoptions on your facility. Intensive two-day 2012 NFPA 99, and three-day 2012 NFPA 101 Essentials for Health Care Classroom Trainings are coming to a city near you. Or, learn at your own pace on PC or laptop with the 2012 NFPA 99 Online Series. Enroll today!

 

 

Fire Protection Training

 

Gain a fundamental understanding of how the 2017 edition of NFPA 25: Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems works to help ensure sprinklers are ready for action. NFPA 25 Classroom Training includes discussion and job-based activities, or go online for a self-paced introduction. New expert-led NFPA Hands-On Training for Facilities Managers deepens your understanding of fire protection and life safety systems with demonstrations in a state-of-the-art lab .

 

NFPA is winding down a week of meetings at its conference center in Quincy, MA with members of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Committee TC 268 Sustainable Cities and Communities.

 

Representatives from France, Germany, Britain, Japan, China, Brazil, Sweden, Canada, and the US gathered to discuss global standards efforts related to smart and sustainable cities. More than seven subcommittees and working groups have been taking part in this collaborative effort.

 

The group has been developing standards for cities and communities to assess and improve efficiency, resiliency, and sustainability through infrastructure, management systems, and data. The five-day program, facilitated by Greg Cade, Director of Government Affairs for NFPA and Meghan Housewright, NFPA’s Associate General Counsel, wraps up tomorrow.iso meeting blog.JPG

 

Highlights of the week include:

 

• Creating standards to implement a management system standard (MSS) for community sustainable development.

• Developing City Indicators, which cover city functioning and quality of life, as well as indicators for resilience and smart cities.  

• Developing a descriptive framework for cities to identify the different elements and functions of a city into layers and components.

• Building a maturity model for “smart community infrastructure.”

• Establishing standards for “smart transportation,” with a focus on compact cities, park-and-ride systems, and battery-powered bus systems.

 

The ISO meetings brought together global stakeholders interested in sharing knowledge, ideas and consensus-based standards expertise to support growing international interest in smart and sustainable cities.

TRAINING FOR LIFE

2-Day Classroom Training

NFPA 70E®: Electrical Safety in the Workplace

November 10-11, 2016 Warren, New Jersey

 

70E2.JPGNFPA 70E®: Electrical Safety in the Workplace 2-Day Classroom Training is now scheduled for November 10-11, 2016 in Warren, New Jersey.

 

NFPA 70E®: Electrical Safety in the Workplace teaches you how to apply the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E to assess electrical risks and reduce employee exposure to potentially deadly hazards. This 2-day course is available around the country and may be counted toward the 40-hour electrical safety training requirement of the CESCP and CESW certifications. Additional locations include: Denver, Dallas, Seattle, Durham, Quincy, Orlando, and Anaheim.

 

Each year, electrical dangers in the workplace cause hundreds of deaths and thousands of injuries. NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® -- the Standard originally developed at OSHA's request -- is the key to saving lives, reducing liability, and avoiding loss due to electrical incidents. NFPA's clear, authoritative instruction teaches you how to apply the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E to assess electrical risks and reduce employee exposure to potentially deadly hazards.

 

This dynamic, expert-led course uses activities, exercises, videos, job aids, and templates to provide you with the right tools to help set up and follow an electrical safety program, as well as help document safety procedures for compliance with OSHA 1910 Subpart S and OSHA 1926 Subpart K. Whether you're an employer responsible for personnel safety or an employee tasked with identifying and addressing electrical hazards, NFPA 70E training is vital. Complete details for this 2-day training are available HERE.

 

Did you know? If you have 10 or more colleagues our instructors will come to you—so your staff doesn't have to go anywhere! Find out more about on-site training at your facility.

 

Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year - pick the locations and courses that work for you. We also offer online training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more.

TRAINING FOR LIFE

3-Day Hands-on Training

NFPA 25: Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems 

November 7-9, 2016 Warren, New Jersey 

 

NFPA 25: Hands-On Inspection Testing and Maintenance of Water Based Fire Protection Systems combines classroom learning with hands-on training in a state-of-the-art lab environment. Review NFPA 25, chapter-by-chapter with an expert NFPA instructor then apply what you’ve learned on actual equipment. With a better understanding of NFPA 25 along with the hands-on experience you should save time and money on planning, installations, reviews, maintenance, training and more.

 

Complete course details are available HERENFPA Members save an additional 10%.

 

REGISTER NOW

Don't wait space is limited!

 

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Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year - pick the locations and courses that work for you. We also offer online training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more.

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From the article on Motion Picture Production Hazards:  "An outdoor set built on an open stage ... Such construction near a studio building constitutes an exposure hazard. Note that the camera man is smoking."

 

From the NFPA Quarterly v. 15, no. 3, 1922

"The tremendous growth of the motion picture industry has been one of the commercial marvels of the past decade....

As has been the case with most new rapidly growing industries, there has been a period when the development of safeguards has not kept pace with the creation of new hazards...

While the film is regarded as the first hazard of the motion picture industry, the rapid development of large scale production has introduced other studio hazards which are treated in some detail in this article."

 

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NFPA 13 Storage Protection Requirements and Assessment (2016) Online Training Series

stateonline_200b.pngThis 3-part interactive online training introduces students to the basic principles for the application, design, and assessment of automatic sprinkler systems protecting miscellaneous and warehouse storage occupancies. Based on the 2016 edition of NFPA 13, this training is ideal for anyone whose job involves designing, reviewing, evaluating, or installing water-based fire protection systems, including: designers, installers, engineers, electrical contractors, technicians, project managers, fire marshals, insurers, and architects.

 

Bruce Clarke, PE was integral to the development of the course and says, “The new NFPA 13 online storage series training builds on your basic understanding of NFPA 13 by detailing the terminology and concepts used with storage analysis and design. Plus, participants are taken through “real world” reviews during the practice activities. The series covers basic concepts and terminology followed by a focused session on rack storage and then floor/other storage arrangements both typically and atypically seen.”


Learn more about the NFPA 13 Storage Protection Requirements and Assessment Online Training.

Click here.

 

Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year - pick the locations and courses that work for you. We also offer online training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more.

 

TRAINING FOR LIFE

NFPA 2-Day Hands-on Training for Facilities Managers: Essentials for Life Safety and Fire Protection

Nov. 10-11, 2016 • Cranston, RI

 

Learn about the life-saving systems that protect your building's occupants, and see those systems in action.

• Classroom instruction led by experts from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA®)

• Special hands-on training and demonstrations of the critical fire protection and life safety equipment in a state-of-the-art training facility

 

See requirements in practice:
NFPA 101®: The Life Safety Code
NFPA 72®: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code
NFPA 25: Inspection Testing and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems

 

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Don't wait — space is limited!
Get the insights and know-how you need to manage vendors, provide answers to AHJs and, ultimately, keep your occupants safe. Ideal for anyone concerned with facility safety and code compliance including: facility maintenance personnel, building owners, engineers, designers, and project managers.

 

Complete details for this 2-day training are available HERE.

 

Learn more about NFPA Training. Our codes and standards classroom training is offered in 20+ U.S. cities each year - pick the locations and courses that work for you. We also offer online training, customized onsite programs, certification programs, educational conferences, and more.

198213.pngThe following proposed Tentative Interim Amendment (TIAs) for NFPA 1982, Standard on Personal Alert Safety Systems, is being published for public review and comment:

 

 

Anyone may submit a comment on this proposed TIA by the November 9, 2016 closing date. Along with your comment, please identify the number of the TIA and forward to the Secretary, Standards Council by the closing date.

IMG_1157.JPGOur International Department is excited to welcome visitors from India, who are at NFPA headquarters today! The delegation, which has traveled to the U.S. at the invitation of our FM Global friends, represents members of various codes and standards committees for the Bureau of Indian Standards.

 

The participants here today include:

  • Ashok Menon - Director, Goa Fire Service
  • M.V. Deshmukh - President, National Association of Fire Officers
  • Subhash Kumar - GM (Fire), Airport Authority of India
  • A K Sharma, Ex - Director, Delhi Fire Service
  • Santosh Warick -  Fire Advisor & Chief Fire Officer, MIDC Fire Service,
  • Devendra Potphode - CFO, Pune City Metropolitan Authority
  • Dr. G A Bhat -  Ex Fire Advisor, Govt of J&K
  • TRA Krishnan - National Building Code Writer
  • Ratnakar Chimote - Chief Scientist, CBRI, Code committee member

 

This group will be learning about NFPA’s standards development process, our standards concerning life safety and fire sprinklers, the work of the Research Foundation, and our Big Data initiative. 

 

India is the most populous democracy in the world (1.2 billion people) and has become one of the fastest growing major economies.  It is now considered a newly industrialized country with significant fire protection challenges. A number of our standards are already used by design professionals in India, and as we continue building relationships with India’s representatives, we hope to expand their use of our codes and standards to strengthen fire and life safety throughout the country.

 

A warm welcome goes out to the delegation!

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All eyes on the Eastern seaboard are on Hurricane Matthew, which has already churned through western Haiti, and as of this writing, is heading toward Cuba. Our friends at FEMA have compiled a helpful list of safety tips -- what to do before, during, and after a hurricane.

 

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which forced the emergency evacuation of three hospitals in the New York City area, there was much focus on ensuring proper backup power and expedited power restoration for critical healthcare facilities.

 

In 2015, NFPA Journal® spoke with Eric Cote, one of the founders of Powered for Patients, an initiative to protect patient health when power supplies were compromised. Read the interview, which includes Mr. Cote's take that hospitals and utilities can do much more to work together before a disaster to help avoid a loss of power, and also to expedite the restoration of power.

 

Also see: Checklists for facility managers on safeguarding emergency power supply systems before, during and after disasters. The checklists are excerpted from FEMA Document P-1019: Emergency Power Systems for Critical Facilities: A Best Practices Approach to Improving Reliability.

 

More about a recent U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) ruling that  >hospitals, transplant centers, critical access hospitals and long-term care facilities carefully evaluate their emergency and standby power systems.

When it comes to data-driven decision making, the fire service is increasingly coming to the realization that data – locally and nationally - can be a serious game changer. Why the shift in thinking?45212388_m.jpg

 

Fire leaders and line firefighters are seeing that data can help tell their story. Data is gut instinct’s wingman. It validates the collective wisdom of a department and reinforces operational, tactical and inspection discussions with stakeholders in a way that is relevant and quantifiable.

 

Fire departments today are working on their own, collaborating with vendors and partnering via NFPA's Data Analytics Sandbox to capture and analyze local data as a means for influencing department strategy, budget conversations, outreach efforts, and health and wellness practices.

 

Former U.S. Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill used to say, “All politics is local.” The same can be said for data. This wasn’t the case in the past. It was a top down process where fire departments were asked to fill out forms. Frankly, many thought it was an administrative nuisance with very little value on the local level. The data was outdated and aggregated, therefore it was not persuasive during those hard discussions with local officials.

 

Today, data is being captured and analyzed by departments, shared with community decision-makers and the type of data is being expanded upon by national leaders like NFPA. The result is a clearer picture of the fire service in stations, headquarters, city halls, town offices and throughout the nation.

 

46403607_m.jpgA new generation of fire service data is upon us. The National Fire Data System (NFDS), which is being funded by an Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) and developed by NFPA, will help fire departments tell their story.

 

NFPA has had the back of the fire service for more than a century - providing standards and research related to fire hazards, operations, ground assault, inspections, prevention, health and wellness. We understand the pressure the fire service is under. Fires are declining and our first responders are being asked to take on additional roles in disaster response, emergency medical services, community paramedicine, fire prevention, and other disciplines. NFPA believes that fire, life and building safety data can help change the conversation; and we are excited to work with fire service innovators that want to effect positive change with computer learning and smart technology.

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