Gregory Harrington

How appropriate - amendments to NFPA 101 debated today, #101Wednesdays

Blog Post created by Gregory Harrington Employee on Jun 7, 2017

The NFPA membership took to the floor today at the Annual Technical Meeting (aka the "Tech Session") to debate certified amending motions (CAMs) on numerous codes and standards, including NFPA 101. (The motions can be found in the Tech Session agenda here.) Here are the results of the voting:

  • CAM 101-1: FAILED - Physical violence mitigation objective remains in Ch. 4.
  • CAM 101-2: FAILED - Smoke detection for shutters in smoke partitions remains as published in 8.4.3.6 of the NFPA 101 second draft.
  • CAM 101-3: PASSED - Provision allowing two releasing operations for existing educational occupancy door locks to prevent unwanted entry in 15.2.2.2.4 deleted.
  • CAM 101-4: PASSED - Provision restricting existing educational occupancy door locks to prevent unwanted entry to one operation added to 15.2.2.2.4 (subject to technical committee/correlating committee ballot).
  • CAM 101-5: PASSED - Provision allowing two releasing operations for existing day-care occupancy door locks to prevent unwanted entry in 17.2.2.2.6 deleted.
  • CAM 101-6: PASSED - Provision allowing two releasing operations for existing business occupancy door locks to prevent unwanted entry in 39.2.2.2.2 deleted.
  • CAM 101-7: PASSED - Provision restricting existing business occupancy door locks to prevent unwanted entry to one operation added to 39.2.2.2.2 (subject to technical committee/correlating committee ballot).
  • CAM 101-8: FAILED - Maintains new provision for 40,000 sq-ft smoke compartments in new hospitals.
  • CAM 101-9: FAILED - Maintains new provision for 40,000 sq-ft smoke compartments in existing hospitals.
  • CAM 101-10: PASSED - Revises occupant load factor for business use from 100 sq-ft per person to 150 sq-ft per person in new business occupancies (subject to technical committee/correlating committee ballot).
  • CAM 101-11: PASSED - Adds new occupant load factors of 15 sq-ft per person and 30 sq-ft per person for collaboration rooms of varying sizes in new business occupancies (subject to technical committee/correlating committee ballot).
  • CAM 101-12: PASSED - Revises occupant load factor for business use from 100 sq-ft per person to 150 sq-ft per person in existing business occupancies (subject to technical committee/correlating committee ballot).
  • CAM 101-13: PASSED - Adds new occupant load factors of 15 sq-ft per person and 30 sq-ft per person for collaboration rooms of varying sizes in existing business occupancies (subject to technical committee/correlating committee ballot).
  • CAM 101-14: PASSED - Deletes new requirement for risk analysis for mass notification systems in new business occupancies that require a fire alarm system.
  • CAMs 101-15 through 101-25: NOT PURSUED - Maintains requirements for testing of integrated fire protection and life safety systems as published in the NFPA 101 second draft.

 

Note that where amendments delete new text, they will still be balloted by the technical committee and correlating committee. However, regardless of the ballots, the net result is the same: the text returns to that in the previous (2015) edition. So where an amendment passed deleting new text, we know the net result is previous edition text, no matter which way the balloting goes.

 

It was great to watch firsthand such an important aspect of the NFPA standards development process. Voices were heard, and the direction of NFPA 101 was definitely influenced here in Boston. I'd like to personally thank Standards Council Member Bonnie Manley, who served as Presiding Officer for the NFPA 101 portion of the Tech Session, NFPA 101 Correlating Committee Chair Bill Koffel, who managed the correlating and technical committee positions, and the following technical committee chairs and members who represented (or were ready to represent) their respective committees on the various issues: Vic Dubrowski, Jim Lathrop, Joe Jardin, Howard Hopper, Amy Murdock, Mike Crowley, and Dave Collins. These dedicated volunteers, and the NFPA members who attended the session, are the ones who make the system work. THANK YOU!

(If you ever wondered, this is the view from the platform... Looking good NFPA!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you found this special edition of #101Wednesdays to be informative, and that I'll see you all again next week when I return with our "regularly scheduled programming." Until then, stay safe!

 

Got an idea for a topic for a future #101Wednesdays? Post it in the comments below – I’d love to hear your suggestions!

 

Did you know NFPA 101 is available to review online for free? Head over to www.nfpa.org/101 and click on “Free access to the 2015 edition of NFPA 101.”

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFPAGregH

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