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#101Wednesdays: Revision process for 2021 edition of NFPA 101 starts now!

Blog Post created by gharrington Employee on Jan 17, 2018
(The mock revision shown in the photo wouldn’t be accepted because it isn’t in mandatory language, although it has merit.) 

We recently released the 2018 edition of the Life Safety Code and its companion Life Safety Code Handbook. (I’m still catching my breath.) The cycle of code revisions never stops, so here we are, ready to start working on the next, the 2021 edition. NFPA 101 is now open for public input, along with a number of other standards in the Annual 2020 revision cycle, which includes NFPA 1, Fire Code, and NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code.

 

I often tell attendees of NFPA’s Life Safety Code Essentials Seminar that you don’t get to complain about what’s in the code if you don’t participate in the process, similar to not complaining about politicians if you don’t vote. You don’t have to be an NFPA technical committee member to participate. Anyone can participate by submitting public input (PIs) and public comments (PCs) on proposed revisions. NFPA has made the process incredibly easy. Login to the NFPA website, navigate to the appropriate document information page (e.g., www.nfpa.org/101), click on ‘Next Edition’, and click the link to submit a PI or PC. The current code text will come up. All you have to do is type your revisions and a substantiation and you’re done.

 

The applicable technical committee will review and consider your submittal. Granted, the 2018 edition of NFPA 101 just hit the streets, so chances are you’re not familiar with all the new requirements. If you’re an NFPA member, you can view my one hour 2015 to 2018 NFPA 101 Changes webinar at no charge. The Origin and Development section of the code also provides a summary of the key changes. If I had to narrow it down, I would say the top five changes to the 2018 edition are:

 

• New requirements for hazardous materials protection that goes beyond fire-related hazards

• Added criteria for door locking to prevent unwanted entry in educational, daycare, and business occupancies to accommodate active-shooter/lockdown emergencies

• New provisions that permit health care and ambulatory health care smoke compartments up to 40,000 ft2 (3720 m2) in area

• New requirements for risk analyses for mass notification systems

• New testing requirements for integrated fire protection and life safety systems in accordance with NFPA 4, Standard for Integrated Fire Protection and Life Safety System Testing

 

If any of these or any other life safety topics are of interest to you, you’re encouraged to look at the requirements and provide recommended revisions. Our technical committees can’t operate effectively in a vacuum; input from the people directly affected by the code’s requirements is vital.

 

The clock is ticking; the public input closing date for NFPA 101 is June 27, 2018. If you miss that deadline, any new proposed revisions won’t be able to be considered until the 2024 edition cycle. (That’s a long wait.) Visit our website for more details on the NFPA code development process or to submit public input on NFPA 101.

 

Thanks for reading, and as always, stay safe.

 

Got an idea for a topic for a future #101Wednesdays? Post it in the comments below – I’d love to hear your suggestions!

 

Did you know NFPA 101 is available to review online for free? Head over to www.nfpa.org/101 and click on “FREE ACCESS.”

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFPAGregH

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