Skip navigation
All Places > NFPA Today > Blog > 2018 > June > 14

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

 

  • 72-1 Group Amending Motion to Accept Public Comment Nos. 386 and 387 passed. 
  • 72-2 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 388 passed. 
  • 72-3 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 389 failed. 
  • 72-4 Group Amending Motion to Accept Public Comment Nos. 155 and 156 passed. 
  • 72-5 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 458 passed. 
  • 72-6 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 6 passed. 

 

NFPA 72 was passed with 5 amending motions. NFPA 72 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems

 

  • 110-1 Motion to Accept Committee Comment No. 3 passed. 
  • 110-2 Motion to Accept Committee Comment No. 4 passed. 

 

NFPA 110 was passed with 2 amending motions. NFPA 110 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 1730, Standard on Organization and Deployment of Fire Prevention Inspection and Code Enforcement, Plan Review, Investigation, and Public Education Operations

 

  • 1730-1 Accept Public Comment No. 3 was not pursued. 
  • 1730-1 Accept Public Comment No. 1 passed.

 

NFPA 1730 was passed with 1 amending motions. NFPA 1730 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications

 

  • 1001-1 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 66 passed. 
  • 1001-2 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 42 was not pursued. 
  • 1001-3 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 17 passed. 

 

NFPA 1001 was passed with 2 amending motions. NFPA 1001 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 1981, Standard on Open-Circuit Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) for Emergency Services

 

  • 1981-1 Motion to Reject Second Revision Nos. 4, 17, and 22, Second Correlating Revision No. 3 and any related portions of First Revision No. 18, which returns Section 6.6 to previous edition text failed. 

 

NFPA 1981 was passed with 0 amending motions. NFPA 1981 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 13D, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One-and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes

 

  • 13D-1 Motion to Reject Second Revision No. 7 passed. 

 

NFPA 13D was passed with 1 amending motions. NFPA 13D COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems

 

  • 13-1 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 54 passed.
  • 13-2 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 53 passed.
  • 13-3 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 55 passed. 
  • 13-4 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 22 was not pursued. 
  • 13-5 Motion to Reject Second Revision No. 386 and any Related Portions of First Revision No. 751 passed. 
  • 13-6 Motion to Reject Second Correlating Revision No. 9 passed. 
  • 13-7 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 203 was not pursued. 
  • 13-8 Multiple Notices for a Single Motion to Reject Second Revision No. 429 and any Related Portions of First Revision No. 658 passed. 

 

NFPA 13 was passed with 6 amending motions. NFPA 13 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety

 

  • 101A-1 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 12 was not pursued. 

 

NFPA 101A was passed with 0 amending motions. NFPA 101A COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 289, Standard Method of Fire Test for Individual Fuel Packages

 

  • 289-1 Group Amending Motion to Reject an Identifiable Part of Second Revision No. 6 and any related portions of First Revision Nos. 7 and 10 failed. 
  • 289-2 Motion to Reject an Identifiable Part of Second Revision No. 2 and any related portions of First Revision No. 19 passed.

 

NFPA 289 was passed with 1 amending motions. NFPA 289 COMPLETED.

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 241, Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alteration, and Demolition Operations

 

  • 241-1 Motion to Reject Second Revision No. 1 failed. 
  • 241-2 Motion to Reject an Identifiable Part of Second Revision No. 4 was not pursued.

 

NFPA 241 was passed with 0 amending motions. NFPA 241 COMPLETED

 

During today's NFPA Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, the following action has taken place on NFPA 400, Hazardous Materials Code

 

  • 400-1 Motion to Accept Public Comment No. 4 failed.

 

NFPA 400 was passed with 0 amending motions. NFPA 400 COMPLETED.

 



Today is the one-year anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire, which killed over 70 people in West London. I wrote about the incident in an article for NFPA Journal published in August called "London Calling."
The blaze was the deadliest in modern British history and shed light on a growing global fire safety concern: the use of combustible materials in exterior wall components such as high-rise building cladding. In response to the Grenfell fire, NFPA acted swiftly to create resources for AHJs, building owners and designers, and others to navigate the risks and regulations pertaining to exterior wall assemblies.
One such resource, released in February, is the the Exterior Facade Fire Evaluation and Comparison Tool (EFFECT™). An article that will appear in the July/August issue of NFPA Journal details how one early user of the tool, an engineering consultant from Dubai, has found value in it. "EFFECT is a great tool to further the conversation of combustible cladding risk mitigation," he told me in the spring. "Cladding replacement is invasive and expensive and it can be challenging to highlight existing risks and incentivize building owners to invest in addressing these issues. EFFECT is an easy, and arguably proactive, way to input data about a building and get a clear and concise rating that is unbiased."
Read the full story here. And for all of NFPA's resources on exterior wall assemblies, go to nfpa.org/exteriorwalls.

A disastrous fire occurred in McPherson, Kansas on the night of June 13, 1933, completely destroying a theatre, lumber yard and a mercantile building. The circumstances surrounding the fire and its development are of particular interest to volunteer fire departments and those in rural areas.

 


At 10:20pm on night of June 13, 1933, a taxi-driver noticed a fire had started in a commercial truck that was being stored in the local lumber yard. On the day of the fire, all but two members of the McPherson volunteer fire department were out of town attending a training.


There were no fire extinguishers in the vicinity of the fire to prevent the fire from spreading. While the fire station was located across the street from the lumber yard, the two remaining firefighters were unable to operate the pumper. Local people volunteered to help but did not have firefighting experience.


From NFPA’s Volunteer Firemen v.1, no.1, 1933:


“When it appeared the fire was out of control requests were made to the cities of Lindsborg, 14 miles distant, and Hutchinson, 34 miles distant. The former responded with a 750-gallon pumper and three volunteer firemen, and the latter city sent a company of four men and a 750-gallon pumper. Hose streams, six from pumpers and three direct from hydrants, were used on the fire.


Long before this outside help had arrived the fire had spread to near-by buildings an area of about 42,000 square feet was burned over.


Undoubtedly if more of the members of the local volunteer fire department had been in the city the fire would have been controlled before it gained much headway. The loss would have been unquestionably greater had it not been for the able assistance rendered by the Lindsborg and Hutchinson fire departments. Hydrants and hose threads in these cities were all standardized, so there was no delay in getting into service once they arrived.”


For more information regarding this and other moments in fire history, please feel free to reach out to the NFPA Research Library & Archives.


We house all of NFPA's publications, both current and historic. Library staff are available to answer research questions from members and the general public.

Filter Blog

By date: By tag: