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February 14, 2019 Previous day Next day

NFPA 35, Standard for the Manufacture of Organic Coatings, and NFPA 36, Standard for Solvent Extraction Plants, are currently seeking committee members. We are in need of new professionals to step forward to help staff the following technical committees:

 

Manufacture of Organic Coatings (MAC-AAA): Applicants are being sought with expertise in organic coatings manufacturing. Stakeholders in all interest categories such as special experts, manufacturers, insurance, users, and applied research/testing laboratory are encouraged to submit an online application. Submit an online application*

 

  • Committee Scope: This Committee shall have primary responsibility for documents on the fire and explosion hazards associated with the design, construction, and operation of organic coating manufacturing processes and facilities (NFPA 35).

 

Solvent Extraction Plants (SOL-AAA): Applicants are being sought with expertise in oilseed extraction using solvent methods. Stakeholders in all interest categories such as special experts, manufacturers, insurance, users, and applied research/testing laboratory are encouraged to submit an online application. Submit an online application*

 

  • Committee Scope: This Committee shall have primary responsibility for documents on safeguarding against the fire and explosion hazards associated with the design, construction, and operation of solvent extraction plants (NFPA 36).

 

Please note: You will be asked to sign-in or create a free online account with NFPA before using the online application system.

Jennifer Taylor, left, working with San Diego firefighter Ben Vernon, who was stabbed by a patient in 2015.

 

As detailed in the January/February issue of NFPA Journal, violence against first responders has become a serious issue in many countries across the Western world. Unfortunately, with no adequate system in place to track these incidents, and with many responders feeling pressure not to report patient violence against them, we have very little understanding about the scope or cause of the problem.

 

Jennifer Taylor, a researcher and founding director of the Center for Firefighter Injury Research & Safety Trends (FIRST) at Drexel University, is trying to change that. With a $1.5 million Assistance to Firefighters grant—the first given for a project addressing the EMS side of the fire service—Taylor and her researchers are working with fire departments in four pilot cities to better understand  how often violence happens on the job, and to test procedures the Drexel team has developed to cutback the number of attacks.    

 

“If the organizations make these changes, we should see the needles move on lower burnout, higher engagement with work, better morale, and less anxiety and depression—those are our expectations for what we’re doing,” Taylor said in an interview.

 

To learn much more on the project, and how Taylor and her team aim to achieve their ambitious aims, read “Responder Advocate,” which accompanies the recent cover story, “The Toll of Violence,” in the January/February issue of NFPA Journal.

 

On a similar note, NFPA Journal “First Responder” columnist John Montes wrote this month about the efforts underway to get first responders the mental health support they need. As on-the-job-violence increases, responders of all stripes have growing rates of depression, substance abuse, suicide, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Newer methods, such as peer-to-peer support groups and working with therapists with responder backgrounds, are increasingly popular and effective ways of helping firefighters, police, and EMS workers deal with the stresses of their work.

 

Learn much more about this issue and some specific examples of successful programs in Montes’s latest “First Responder” column in the January/February NFPA Journal.

From Volunteer Firemen v.6, no.3 (1939):
“Ignitze” is an ingenious public education device designed by F.L. McCament of the U.S. Forest Service and used at the New Mexico State Fair with the help of the Albuquerque Fire Department. Operated by firemen inside the “fire-proofed” skin, “Ignitze” has matches for horns, moves his eyes, jaws and legs, smokes viciously at a monster pipe and cigarette.
For more information regarding this and other moments in fire history, please feel free to reach out to the NFPA Research Library & Archives.
The NFPA Archives houses all of NFPA's publications, both current and historic. Library staff are available to answer research questions from members and the general public.

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