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NFPA Today

104 Posts authored by: lisamariesinatra Employee

hurricanes, floods, electrical safety, hurricane harvey

 

Hurricane Harvey made landfall along the Texas coastline last Friday evening bringing with it winds of about 130 mph, torrential rains and significant flooding. Parts of Louisiana and the lower Mississippi Valley are also expecting heavy rains due to the hurricane this week.

 

As Harvey bears down on the coast, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) is alerting contractors in the area of their “Evaluating Water-Damaged Electrical Equipment” document aimed specifically at contractors who will be called in to help with the damage assessment once the waters have receded. The guide is free and available for download on NEMA's website.

 

The document provides guidelines on how to handle electrical equipment that has been exposed to water. It's designed for suppliers, installers, inspectors and users of electrical products, and outlines items that require complete replacement or those that can be reconditioned by a trained professional. Such equipment includes:

* Electrical distribution equipment

* Motor circuits

* Power equipment

* Transformers

* Wire, cable and flexible cords

* Wiring devices

* GFCIs and surge protectors

* Lighting fixtures and ballasts,

* Motors and electronic products

 

According to NEMA, field representatives have reached out Texas officials, local contractors and building officials to offer this guidance during the clean-up to help ensure that electrical safety remains a top priority during the initial assessment and cleanup of flooded communities. NEMA also recommends that inspectors, suppliers and others contact the original manufacturer of the equipment if there are questions and/or a need for specific recommendations. 

 

Industry professionals looking for electrical information related to NFPA 70 (National Electrical Code) can find it on NFPA's  NEC webpage. Additional information on electrical worker safety (NFPA 70E) is also available.  

 

Image: weather.com

 

If you’re a project manager responsible for reviewing and approving plans, or an engineer or designer who needs to ensure sprinkler system plans are ready for submission to AHJs, then you know there’s a lot riding on the accuracy and timeliness of these plans. So, how then do you best tackle these day-to-day challenges and put your best foot forward with every project? NFPA’s "Automatic Sprinkler Systems Plans Review Two-Day Training and Workshop," that’s how!

 

If you’ve never taken one of our training classes before, the workshop will help you build upon your on-the-job expertise with additional training that shows you how to avoid the pitfalls of poor planning, and provides the necessary tools to help you save time and avoid costly and potentially dangerous errors and omissions. But don’t take our word for it. In the following video, two participants tell us in their own words how the training provided them with the necessary information, tools and tips that in turn gave them the confidence they needed going forward to review plans and approve them accurately.

 


As an added benefit, you’ll notice that this training goes beyond the usual “lecture” style format. It actually focuses on practical, hands-on learning where you’ll will be able to review plans and calculations, identify deficiencies and document findings. Based on NFPA 13: Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, the workshop focuses on:

 

* Blueprint reading skills

* Regulatory requirements for plans and calculations submittals
* Sprinkler specifications
* An 8-step process for hydraulic calculations review 
* An 8-step process for sprinkler plans review


We invite you to join us September 28 – 29, 2017 for this unique training experience. NFPA is devoted to helping you do your job better throughout your entire career. So come find out more, and register on NFPA's training page.  

CAL FIRE, wildfire hazards, C&E2017, embers
As most of us know, states across the U.S. can no longer rely on a defined fire season. This sobering truth is especially evident in California where the fire season is 70 days longer than it was 40 years ago, and fire ignitions in the state have greatly increased in the last few years (in 2016, fire ignitions were greater than the 5-year average).
And while these stats are staggering, in California there has been a dramatic increase in prevention activities over recent years, including defensible space inspections, public education efforts and vegetation treatment projects funded by grants. So why are an alarming number of structures still being destroyed by wildfires?
That’s the question Dave Shew, Staff Chief for CAL FIRE, Planning and Risk Analysis Department, Office of the State Fire Marshall, posed to a packed room for his session: “Structure Loss in the WUI: Why do Losses Continue to Rise Despite Increased Prevention Efforts?” at NFPA’s 2017 Conference & Expo in June. It's also the subject of a recent NFPA Journal article, "Structure Survival," where Shew is interviewed.
While Shew made it clear in his session that the answer doesn’t consist of one "silver bullet,” the keys to resolving the challenge, he says, are tied to embers and communities working more closely together on solutions. Here, Shew explains that there is more than one way to tackle the wildfire problem.
To this end, Shew says that wildfire safety advocates still have a lot of work to do when it comes to educating the public about the dangers of embers and the impact they have on the survivability of a home during a fire. "We have to get better at talking to the public," he says.
One way to do that is for communities to collaborate with their local fire departments. Shew believes the next paradigm shift in the fire service will see firefighters taking a more active role in talking to homeowners about wildfire risk. Shew told the audience he knows this concept doesn’t make him a popular guy in the office. “My colleagues in the fire service get mad at me every time I mention it,” he says. Still, Shew explains his reasoning behind why firefighters need to get more involved with the public when it comes to wildfire education.
In all honesty, you can’t help but get caught up in Shew’s passion and determination when it comes to wildfire safety. From the positive reaction of the audience (many stayed long after the presentation was over to ask questions) it was clear they did, too. We don't want you to miss this presentation, so we've included the full audio version of his talk for you to listen to. And if you find inspiration or have thoughts to share after you’ve tuned in, we’d love to hear from you.
Did you know that NFPA Conference & Expo attendees and NFPA members get full access to all the 2017 NFPA C&E education session audio & video files? Browse the full list of education sessions to find the attached audio/video you'd like to view.

70E, worker safety

In preparation for the release of the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA is hosting a free webinar on Wednesday, July 12 from 10:00 – 10:30 AM EDT that will help explain the proposed changes and provide an opportunity for participants to ask question about the revised code.  

 

If you haven't had the chance, there's still time to register. It's a great opportunity to get a first-hand look at the changes that could impact the industry as a whole, as well as the work you do every day. The webinar, “Proposed Changes to the 2018 Edition of the NFPA 70E,” will feature NFPA’s Chris Coache, senior electrical engineer, and Derek Vigstol, electrical technical lead, who will discuss some of these important proposed changes in the 2018 revision. 

 

Join us, and be among the first to learn about the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. 

automatic sprinkler plans review, NFPA 13

Are you a project manager responsible for reviewing and approving plans, or an engineer or designer who needs to ensure sprinkler system plans are ready for submission to AHJs? If so, then you know there’s a lot riding on the accuracy and timeliness of these plans. So how can you best tackle these day-to-day challenges and put your best foot forward with every project?


NFPA’s latest two-day class and workshop can help you build upon your on-the-job expertise with additional training that shows you how to avoid the pitfalls of poor planning and provides you with the necessary tools to help you save time and avoid costly and potentially dangerous errors and omissions.


The training, "Automatic Sprinkler Systems Plans Review Two-Day Training and Workshop," goes beyond the usual “lecture” style format and instead focuses on practical, hands-on learning where participants will be able to review plans and calculations, identify deficiencies and document findings. Based on NFPA 13: Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, the workshop covers such topics as:


• Regulatory requirements for plans and calculations submittals
• Blueprint reading skills
• Sprinkler specifications
• An 8-step process for hydraulic calculations review
• An 8-step process for sprinkler plans review


We invite you to join us July 13 – 14 in Cranston, Rhode Island for this unique training experience. At NFPA, we’re devoted to helping you do your job better throughout your entire career. Find out more, and register on NFPA’s training page.

70E, worker safety

In preparation for the release of the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace we’re hosting a free webinar on Wednesday, July 12 from 10:00 – 10:30 AM EDT that will help explain the proposed changes and provide an opportunity for participants to ask question about the revised code.

Whether you’re an electrician, electrical engineer, contractor, facility manager, property owner, building manager or a safety engineer responsible for electrical safety in your workplace, this is a chance to get a first-hand look at the proposed changes that could impact the industry as a whole, as well as the work you do every day.

 

The webinar, “Proposed Changes to the 2018 Edition of the NFPA 70E,” will feature NFPA’s Chris Coache, senior electrical engineer, and Derek Vigstol, electrical technical lead, who will discuss some of these important proposed changes in the 2018 revision. They include:

• Risk assessment procedure; the hierarchy of risk controls and human error
• Establishing an electrically-safe work condition that includes Lockout/Tagout principles and procedures
• Estimate of the likelihood of occurrence of an arc flash incident for AC and DC systems
• Selection of arc-rated clothing and other personal protective equipment (PPE) using the incident energy analysis method

 

This event will fill up quickly and we don't want you to be left out. Be among the first to learn more about the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E and register for the webinar today!

 

May is Electrical Safety Month and throughout the month, NFPA and ESFI have been raising awareness of potential electrical hazards and the importance of electrical fire safety on the job.

 

This week we’re testing your knowledge on an aspect of NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace with a question from one of our recent NFPA Live events. Here, Derek Vigstol, NFPA’s technical lead for Electrical Technical Services, asks: What is Normal Operation?

 

Think you know the answer? Watch this quick video to find out, then learn how you can access the full question and answer, and other important, related information.

 

For more information and resources about Electrical Safety Month, visit NFPA's electrical safety webpage.

70E, worker safety

May is Electrical Safety Month and throughout the month, NFPA and ESFI have been raising awareness of potential electrical hazards and the importance of electrical fire safety on the job.


This week, we’re highlighting some important statistics that point to the dangers of electrical work, and offering training opportunities to help employees and employers reduce the risk of injuries on the job, and create a safer electrical workplace. Check out our “70E: Did You Know” interactive demonstration to learn more.


We also wanted to let you know that NFPA has a new newsletter dedicated to all things electrical including NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace and  NFPA 70: National Electrical Code (NEC). When you’re looking for information about safe electrical design, installation and inspection, training, events, worker safety and more, NEC Connect has the answers you’re looking for. Check it out and subscribe today!

electrical safetyele

 

May is Electrical Safety Month and throughout the month, NFPA and ESFI have been raising awareness of potential electrical hazards and the importance of electrical fire safety on the job. We’re dedicated to providing valuable, life-saving information to help employees make safe choices and tips for creating a safer work environment.


To that end, NFPA’s senior electrical engineer, Chris Coache, has created a blog series devoted to NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace. The series covers a wide range of topics from the role of the contract employer to PPE, energized work permits and justified energized electrical work, and everything in between. If you’ve always wanted to better understand NFPA 70E, this series is for you.


Read the whole series or choose the topics most relevant to you and your job. You can find the series on NFPA’s Xchange platform.


For additional information and resources, check out ESFI’s workplace safety pages on their website, and stay tuned for more electrical worker safety-related topics coming this month.

May is Electrical Safety Month and throughout the month, NFPA and ESFI have been raising awareness of potential home electrical hazards and the importance of electrical fire safety. This week we want to share one of NFPA's most popular videos, “A Shocking Revelation,” that features our beloved character, Dan Doofus. Follow along as Dan learns from his mistakes and forges a new path for safer electrical practices in his home, and invites you to do the same!

 

Learn more about electrical fire safety  on NFPA’s campaign webpage and at www.esfi.org, and stay tuned for more great resources throughout the month.

70E, worker safety

May is National Electrical Safety Month and throughout the coming weeks, NFPA and its partner, ESFI, will be sharing information and resources with industry professionals dedicated to creating safer working environments for their employees.This week we're taking a look at the roles of host and contract employers.

According to Derek Vigstol, NFPA’s technical lead for Electrical Tech Services, a common industry misconception is that the contract employer is the only one liable for their workers’ safety. With the next edition of NFPA 70E:  Electrical Safety in the Workplace about to complete the revision process, Derek points out that it’s important both contract and host employers understand they have a role when it comes to worker safety.

In the March/April 2017 issue of NFPA Journal, Derek dives into this very subject in his article, Host Employer & Contract Employer: Understanding Roles in Electrical Safety.

Read the article, then tell us what you think. As a host or contract employer, how do you see your role? What kinds of solutions have you developed to increase safety where you work? We’d like to hear from you.

As Electrical Safety Foundation International's (ESFI) National Electrical Safety Month kicks off this first week of May, NFPA is pleased to introduce Brett Brenner, the president of ESFI, as our guest blogger this month. NFPA is an active supporter of ESFI's campaign. Below is Mr. Brenner's post:

 

 

ESFI, electrical, electrical safety, electrical safety month

 

 

Advances in technology typically signify positive growth and efficiency. With these changes, we must also avidly incorporate changes in our safety regulations.


May is National Electrical Safety Month, and the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) continues its annual campaign to inform the public on how to reduce electrical fires and other hazards at home and in the workplace. With this year’s campaign highlighting the importance of adopting the new 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC).


Has your state adopted the new code? ESFI’s "Decoding the NEC to Prevent Shock and Electrocution” edition of Electrical Safety Illustrated provides consumers with a number of industry standard safety upgrades and guidelines to remain on par with the national code, even if your state regulations are several years behind.


In 2015, 134 electrical fatalities occurred, with 60% of those occurring in the Construction industry. ESFI’s Workplace Fatalities and Injuries shows that electrical fatalities have decreased each year since 2003. At work or at home, OSHA and NEC requirements exist to continue reducing the number of these incidents.


Outside, docks and boats can carry sources of electricity as well. A lesser-known hazard, “Electric Shock Drowning” unveils the invisible danger of electrified water in or near marinas. The 2017 National Electrical Code now requires marinas and boatyards to have ground-fault protection to help prevent water electrification.


The NEC has required AFCI protected outlets since 2014. ESFI’s infographic “Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs): Prevent Electrical Fires” explains the importance of these life-saving devices. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that more than 50% of electrical fires that occur every year can be prevented by AFCIs.


This year during National Electrical Safety Month, take the time to inspect your home and work environment for any potential hazards or areas lacking protection. Contact a qualified electrician to ensure your home or workplace is safe and up to code. ESFI’s National Electrical Safety Month resources can help keep yourself, your family, and your coworkers safe. Visit www.esfi.org to learn more.

electrical safety month, electrical safety, tip sheet, ESFI, home electrical safety

It goes without saying that electricity makes our lives easier, but there’s also a good chance that many of us are not really aware of the risks involved.

That’s why NFPA actively supports National Electrical Safety Month, an annual campaign sponsored by Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), which works to raise awareness of potential home electrical hazards and the importance of electrical fire safety, including worker safety, during May. This year’s theme is: Decoding the NEC to Prevent Shock and Electrocution. 

In case you aren't aware of what the NEC is, its "technical" term is NFPA 70: National Electrical Code, and its mission is to provide practical safeguards from the hazards that arise from using electricity. It is the most widely adopted safety code in the U.S. and the world, and the NEC serves as the benchmark for safe electrical installations (that's why NFPA strongly urges residents to use a qualified electrician to do all of their home electrical projects). To learn more, check out ESFI's great infographic that describes the NEC! 

Each week this month our organizations will share resources you can use like infographics, videos, tip sheets and more. The resources are easy to access and they cover a wide range of safety topics that include using electricity outdoors, tips for the home, and important information for industry professionals dedicated to creating a safe working environment.

This week we're highlighting our updated electrical safety tip sheet. It's a reference that includes many action steps you can take now to stay safer in your home.

The more we’re all aware of the risks associated with electricity, the faster we can start putting safety practices into place. Let NFPA and ESFI help. Find information on NFPA’s electrical safety webpage and www.esfi.org, and let’s continue our work together to raise awareness about electrical hazards in our homes, schools and communities.

For the past few months, NFPA has hosted a series of videos to help explain the significant changes to the 2017 edition of NFPA 70: National Electrical Code (NEC) that impacts the electrical industry as a whole, as well as the work you do every day. Many of you have told us how valuable this series is, that the information contained in each of the videos has not only helped you to perform your jobs more efficiently, but it has in effect, helped you to advance electrical safety in the process.

 

That’s why I’m pleased to tell you that the entire NEC changes video series is now available any time you need to revisit a topic or if you want to watch a video for the first time. Whether you’re looking for changes to the code relating to residential or commercial installations, alternative energy technologies, electrical vehicle supply equipment, limited energy and communications systems or special occupancies, or maybe your focus is on the five new articles in the 2017 NEC not covered by previous code editions, you’ll now be able to access this NEC video series easily, and in one place, here on our Xchange platform.

 

 

If you haven’t registered for Xchange yet, you can do so today. Look for the login link above to login or register for your free account. Many of you have already expressed an interest in using the platform, and still many more have actually utilized Xchange to ask questions, start conversations and collaborate with expert staff and peers. As your partner in electrical safety, NFPA is here to support you and the work you do every day. Visit Xchange today and find out what the platform can do for you.

fire and life safety codes, quiz, facility manager, building owners, project managers

As a facility manager, building owner or project manager responsible for the safety of a building's occupants, how much do you know about NFPA fire and life safety codes?

 

Take our quick quiz and test your knowledge of NFPA 25: Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems; NFPA 72: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code: and NFPA 80: Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives

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