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5 Posts authored by: gmoniz Employee

A requirement mandating receptacle outlets be installed in meeting rooms may be included in the 2017 NEC. Code Making Panel 2 has developed a first revision that would require a minimum number of receptacle outlets to be installed in meeting rooms intended for the
gathering of seated occupants for such purposes as conferences, deliberations, or similar purposes, where portable electronic equipment such as computers, projectors, or similar equipment is likely to be used.
The addition of this new section addresses safety concerns relating to inadequate access to electrical power in meeting rooms.

 

To view all first draft ballot information (revisions) go to:

 

 

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/document-information-pages?mode=code&code=70&tab=nextedition#FirstDraftBallot

A tightening torque requirement may be included in the 2017 NEC. Code Making Panel 1 has developed a first revision that would require a calibrated torque tool to be used to achieve the indicated torque value, indicated as a numeric value on equipment or in the installation instructions provided by the manufacturer, unless the equipment manufacturer has provided installation instructions for an alternative method of achieving the required torque. Use of proper torque tools is essential to verify that terminations are properly made and the equipment will function properly
throughout its life cycle. Testing has shown that installers use the wrong torque values in up to 75% of installations unless a torque measuring tool is used.

 

To view all first draft ballot information (revisions) go to:

 

 

 

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/document-information-pages?mode=code&code=70&tab=nextedition#FirstDraftBallot

gmoniz

TURN IT OFF

Posted by gmoniz Employee Jun 19, 2015

Most conversations I have regarding electrical safety in the workplace relate to Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). And I usually begin my side of the conversation with two questions: Is the energized work justified? Have you preformed a risk assessment?  The purpose of NFPA 70E is to provide a practical, safe workplace for employees, relative to the hazards arising from the use of electricity. By the use of the hierarchy of safety controls, as explained in NFPA 70E, Informative Annex P, the risks associated with the use of electricity in the workplace can be reduce to an acceptable level. The first control is “Elimination”. Creating an electrically safe work condition, as identified and defined in NFPA 70E, Article 120, is a form of elimination. By creating an electrically safe work condition the risks are reduced to an acceptable level and the potential inherent electrical hazards have been effectively eliminated. It is important to keep in mind that the use of PPE is considered the least effective of the safety controls and the last line of defense before an event happens. NFPA 70E is all about practical, accomplishable electrical safety and about the worker going home safe at the end of the day to his or her family. For more information on the Hierarchy of Safety Controls, See Informative Annex P.

 

Be Safe!

 

Hierarchy of Safety Controls.jpg

                                The Hierarchy of Safety Controls

gmoniz

Arc-flash hazard warning

Posted by gmoniz Employee Jun 19, 2015

The arc-flash hazard warning requirements in 110.16 may be expanded in the 2017 NEC. Code Making Panel 1 has developed a first revision based
on the requirements in the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E that would require additional labeling on service equipment. These installation-related requirements will be located in a new first level subsection 110.16(B) and require service equipment to contain the following information:

    Nominal system voltage

    Arc flash boundary

    At least one of the following:

        Available incident energy and the corresponding working distance

        Minimum arc rating of clothing

        Site-specific level of PPE

 

To view all first draft ballot information (revisions) go to:

 

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/document-information-pages?mode=code&code=70&tab=nextedition#FirstDraftBallot

gmoniz

ATTENTION POOL OWNERS

Posted by gmoniz Employee Jun 19, 2015

ATTENTION POOL OWNERS: By now your pool is open and all
systems are up are running. You carefully monitor the water chemistry,
maintaining safe levels of various products to keep the water clean and healthy
for you and your family; but, have you checked the ground fault circuit
interrupter (GFCI) supplying your pool electrical equipment? A GFCI is a device
such as a receptacle, circuit breaker or part of the supply cord, that is
designed to protect people from electric shocks.  Testing is simple, all GFCIs have a test
button, just push the test button on the device.  While you are carefully monitoring the water
chemistry, the GFCI constantly monitors current flowing through the
circuit.  Take a minute and test the GFCI
now and while you are at it, test the GFCIs protecting your kitchen, bath,
basement and outdoor receptacles. Be Safe!