Lisa Braxton

Car left running in garage leads to CO poisoning

Blog Post created by Lisa Braxton Employee on Apr 23, 2014

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511a5365d970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511a5365d970c-320wi|alt=CO alarms|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=CO alarms|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511a5365d970c img-responsive!A Massachusetts couple and their two young grandchildren are recovering after being taken to the hospital earlier this week with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. The family got sick after the car was left running in the garage. The car was a newer model with a push button ignition.


According to news reports, B.D. Nayak said he didn’t realize the car was still on. He said, later, while painting, he began to feel dizzy. The children got sick with vomiting and his wife passed out. Their son-in-law called 9-1-1 and discovered the source. Fire officials say the house didn’t have CO alarms.


    • It’s important to install and maintain CO alarms in the home.

    • They should be placed in a central location outside each separate sleeping area, on every level of the home, and in other locations as required by laws, codes, or standards.

    • For the best protection have CO alarms that are interconnected throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.


 

More safety messages are provided on the carbon monoxide safety information page and safety tips sheet on the NFPA web site.


!http://i.zemanta.com/140709618_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/140709618_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Testing CO alarms is important
!http://i.zemanta.com/238929737_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/238929737_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Carbon monoxide poisoning can happen at any time

Outcomes