lisabraxton

Plan for a fire-safe Mother’s Day

Blog Post created by lisabraxton Employee on May 1, 2014

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ad95f7970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ad95f7970c-800wi|alt=Mother's Day Flowers1|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Mother's Day Flowers1|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ad95f7970c img-responsive!Restaurants will be doing a brisk business on May 11th, serving brunches and dinners in celebration of moms, step-moms, and phenomenal women who’ve been a source of emotional support for others. However, some women will have the luxury of being pampered right at home with meals prepared for them by members of the family.


If Mother’s Day in your household involves cooking a meal or baking a dessert, a review of cooking safety is in order. The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking. Most of these fires involve the stovetop. If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling the Mother’s Day meal, check it regularly. Remain in the home while cooking and use a timer as a reminder.


 

Additional cooking safety information–including the cooking safety tip sheet–is available free on the NFPA web site. And while you’re checking items off your grocery list for the big day, check your smoke alarms. Smoke alarms should be tested at least once a month using the test button. You can make this into a family activity by going to the Sparky the Fire Dog web site and teaching kids the sound of the smoke alarm and what to do when they hear it with Sparky’s Match Game .


!http://i.zemanta.com/265822773_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/265822773_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Child uses his savings to buy smoke alarms

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