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2014

The results for the annual NFPA Fire Safety Educational Memorial Fund Committee awarded scholarships are in! These awards are given to students who have demonstrated strong leadership potential, exhibited academic achievement and who have contributed to fire safety activities. So without further ado, let’s meet our four extraordinary winners!

MeredithHawesMeredith Hawes, who is pursuing a master’s of science degree in public administration at Central Michigan University, has won the coveted George D. Miller Scholarship. She is the Fire and Safety Educator at Grand Traverse Metro Fire Department and is currently aiding her department in a study to determine the feasibility of merging their at-will, combination department with their city’s full time, professional and unionized department.

She embarked on a mission to create a Risk Watch Coalition for youth in her area and received the Michigan Public Educator of the Year Award for that program. And with that success in her back pocket, she was offered and accepted the role of Education Advisor for the NFPA.

Hawes future goal is the pursuit of a City Manager or Assistant City Manager position.

The George D. Miller Scholarship was established in honor of the former NFPA president and CEO and is awarded to students in fire service or public administration programs.

Smoke Alarm
I don’t know why it happens this way, but common themes for smoke alarm success stories seem to come in waves. Last week, I reported on three home fires where smoke alarms had recently been installed in homes through local fire departments’ installation programs. In each incident, the working smoke alarms alerted the occupants to fire, enabling them all to escape safely.

A similar success story occurred early this morning when a family in Cherry Hill, NJ, awoke to smoke alarms sounding and discovered a fire on the first floor of their home. Just two months prior, the Cherry Hill Fire Department had replaced the family’s smoke alarms.

Clearly, smoke alarm installation programs carry life-saving potential.

Smoke alarm guide imageFor fire departments and/or safety educators who want more information on how to conduct an installation program in their communities, NFPA’s newly updated guide, “Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program”, includes everything you need, from tips on how to select volunteers, to pointers on soliciting donations and publicizing the program.

A report in the July 29 issue of the Modesto Bee (California) newspaper serves as an important reminder that we must all be mindful in the kitchen. According to fire officials, a home fire in the town of Turlock started with oil cooking on a stovetop that was placed on too high heat. The oil caught fire and spread to an adjacent ceiling and wall.

Thankfully, there were no injuries, but the residents have now been displaced. Oil

It's been awhile since I've seen any reports of fires that have started from cooking oil but even so, this news reminds us that it's dangerous if you don't take the proper care in the kitchen. So, check out NFPA's facts about cooking with oil, then review some of our important safety tips before you begin preparing meals in the kitchen. And just so you know, our downloadable tips sheet is perfect for the fridge. Just print it out and stick it to the door. That way, you'll always have the information you need right at your fingertips.

In the end, the more we know about fire safety (and act on it), the more we can prevent cooking accidents from happening in our homes.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ebbf7b970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ebbf7b970c-800wi|alt=Milwaukee Smoke Alarm Canvassing|title=Milwaukee Smoke Alarm Canvassing|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ebbf7b970c image-full img-responsive!


 

Milwaukee firefighters canvassed a neighborhood last week with neighborhood block watch members, representatives of the police department, the Department of Neighborhood Services, Safe and Sound Milwaukee, and the local alderman’s office. Assistant Fire Chief Gerard Washington joined in the canvassing to show his support and meet with community leaders. Firefighters installed smoke alarms where needed and discussed safety tips with residents.


 

“Reaching out to community groups is important,” says Lieutenant Schuyler Belott. “We want to make sure residents’ are protected and let them know what we do.” !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd3bfa07970b-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd3bfa07970b-120wi|alt=Milwaukee Smoke Alarm Placement|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Milwaukee Smoke Alarm Placement|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd3bfa07970b img-responsive!
The event was part of a larger citywide effort to install alarms. Through the help of block grants, the department has installed thousands of smoke alarms. Also, a hotline is available for residents who need to have alarms installed. Fire trucks are equipped with alarms so that firefighters can do installations when they’re on non-emergency calls.


 

Has your department conducted a smoke alarm installation program recently? If so, let me know. If you’re thinking about launching one, NFPA’s Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program can help. General smoke alarm safety information is also available on the NFPA website.


!http://i.zemanta.com/288045814_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/288045814_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Fire officials offer helpful hints for successful smoke alarm installation programs

!http://i.zemanta.com/115801608_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/115801608_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA and Domino's Pizza kick-off FPW deliveries

CPSC ContestHelp stop the invisible killer! CPSC has just announced a new poster contest on the dangers of carbon monoxide.  

The contest is open to middle school students in 6, 7 and 8th grades.  Winning posters will be chosen by a panel of CPSC judges, based on a clear CO safety message, design originality and visual appeal. Three finalists from each grade 6,7 and 8 and one finalist chosen by a public vote on CPSC’s website will get each win $500 for a total of 10 finalists.  CPSC judges will then chose one grand prize winner from the finalists. That lucky middle schooler will get an additional $1,000.      

Use CPSC’s poster contest to teach your community about the dangers of poisonous carbon monoxide. Reach out to middle school students to get them involved in preventing CO poisoning and in saving lives.

This year, CPSC is accepting online submissions only at www.cpsc.gov/COcontest.  A completed parent/guardian permission form is required to participate and must be submitted with the poster online.  The contest runs through February 2015.  

Read more about the dangers of carbon monoxide and learn some important safety tips on the NFPA website. 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df23945970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df23945970d-120wi|alt=SMOKE ALARM GUIDE COVER SHOT|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=SMOKE ALARM GUIDE COVER SHOT|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df23945970d img-responsive!A number of fire departments find that an effective way to reach residents in need of smoke alarms is to keep alarms on the truck. That way, smoke alarms are with firefighters when they answer a call.
“It is important to always be prepared for “on-the-spot” installations because the greatest challenges with outfitting every home in our community with a working smoke alarm are identifying the homes that need them,” says Austin Fire Department Battalion Chief David Girouard.
Additional helpful hints from Girouard and other fire and safety officials are included in NFPA’s “Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program.”The guide, which can be downloaded at no cost from the NFPA website, helps communities plan and implement their own smoke alarm installation programs in which firefighters and trained volunteers install smoke alarms and batteries.

More smoke alarm safety information is available on the NFPA website.<<br />

!http://i.zemanta.com/280091469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/280091469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Updated Smoke Alarm Installation Guide offers how-to for improving safety

!http://i.zemanta.com/286729224_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/286729224_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!St. Louis fire official says smoke alarm installation programs help save lives

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

 

&#0160; !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df43aa9970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df43aa9970d-800wi|alt=Hoarding Fire Engineering Magazine|title=Hoarding Fire Engineering Magazine|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df43aa9970d image-full img-responsive!
<span style="font-size: 8pt;">Photo courtesy of Fire Engineering Magazine</span>


 

The latest issue of Fire Engineering Magazine features an article about the dangers of hoarder fires. Writer Ryan Pennington points out that an often overlooked danger to firefighters is tackling the overhaul phase. After a fire has been knocked down, he says, research shows that many firefighters overexert themselves and are unaware of the dangers. Sifting through pounds of collected material can lead to respiratory problems, broken limbs, pulled backs, and even death. !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df43b9a970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df43b9a970d-120wi|alt=Hoarding Info|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Hoarding Info|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df43b9a970d img-responsive!He says that the overhaul phase can become more manageable with increased on-the-scene staffing, heavy machinery, and shorter work phases.


 

NFPA has a free guide about hoarding and issues for the fire service to be aware of. The document covers what members of the fire service can do when they become aware of a hoarding situation, how to talk to someone about hoarding, and some of the risks hoarding poses&#0160;to the&#0160;fire service. More information on the topic is available on the Hoarding and Fire Safety page on the NFPA website.


!http://i.zemanta.com/119328649_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/119328649_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!New handout on 'Hoarding: Issues for the Fire Service'

!http://i.zemanta.com/138648843_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/138648843_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Firefighters unable to save couple living in clutter

Safety SourceThe July issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education enewsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find; 

  • Fire Prevention Week theme announced
  • Free FPW printable for kids
  • NFPA and local fire departments team up with Domino's Pizza 
  • 10-minute mini-lesson on carbon monoxide 
  • Carbon monoxide tip sheet updated. New Spanish CO tip sheet

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division, activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog® and more.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511e8366e970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511e8366e970c-320wi|alt=Block party 1|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Block party 1|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511e8366e970c img-responsive!Communities across the U.S. and Canada are gearing up for National Night Out, an event commonly held in early August to increase awareness about drug prevention efforts, neighborhood watch, and other anti-crime programs. Typically organized by block watches, nonprofits, and police departments, National Night Out programs also seek to raise awareness about fire safety.


 

NFPA offers a number of educational items for free on the website, including our safety tip sheets, easy to read materialsin other languages, infographics and fun activities for the kids on the parents and educators page of the Sparky the Fire Dog website. It’s not unusual for a National Night Out event to attract hundreds of attendees. It&#39;s&#0160;a great venue for reaching members of the public with information designed to increase their safety.


!http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Read the May issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/213529657_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/213529657_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Read the October issue of Safety Source, NFPA's Public Education newsletter

A recent article in the Wirral Globe, a local newspaper in England, caught my eye last night.

According to the newspaper, a number of kitchen fires have been reported recently (more than usual for this area) and the residents of Wirral, a peninsula in North West England, are being warned about the dangers of cooking when (you) don’t take the proper precautions. Cooking

Throughout the month of August, the UK’s national, Fire Kills Campaign, sponsored by the Department for Communities and Local Government, will highlight cooking fire safety, including how to use electrical appliances appropriately in the kitchen.

The Campaign also focuses on the importance of working smoke alarms, and having an escape plan in place, in case there’s an accident in the kitchen.

Important words, and actions, to live by.

Find out what the UK is doing to help keep its citizens safer from fire; take a look at its Fire Kills Campaign website. You’ll notice the similarities in our messaging. More on the importance of smoke alarms and cooking safety here in the U.S. can be found on NFPA’s website.

It’s comforting to know that in the end, it doesn’t matter what country you live in or what dialect you speak, the universal language of fire safety is a top priority for everyone.  Make sure you keep fire safety first and foremost in your mind every day, as well.

 

In three separate home fires, smoke alarms previously installed by local fire departments made a life-saving difference:


 

Yesterday, in Manchester, UK, the Whitefield Fire Station attended two fire incidents within hours of one another.


The first fire was caused by a bathroom fan, which the family was alerted to by working smoke alarms. “It was an alarm that had been fitted by the fire service that alerted the family,” said Crew Manager Dan Brown.


Hours later, the same crew attended another incident, where a neighbor heard smoke alarms sounding from a ground floor flat. When crews arrived, they found a man fast asleep in his bed while a pan of food was burning downstairs. “It was fortunate that we had fitted the alarm about 10 months ago because it alerted the neighbor to the problem,” said Brown.


 

Meanwhile, smoke alarms installed as part of a local fire department program in West Iredell, NC, last fall were credited with saving the lives of five people on Sunday. In fact, two of the firefighters who installed the alarms were among those responding to the fire.


Everyone in the home was sleeping at the time of the incident, but having smoke alarms outside the sleeping areas provided early warning that allowed the family to escape without harm.


“This is definitely a documented save,” said Iredell County Fire Marshal Garland Cloer.


!http://a7.typepad.com/6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a511e79967970c-320wi|src=http://a7.typepad.com/6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a511e79967970c-320wi|alt=53cc2454bd8f0_preview-300|title=53cc2454bd8f0_preview-300|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a511e79967970c img-responsive!

This smoke alarm, which was installed last fall as part of the West Iredell Fire Department’s installation program, awoke five people to fire, enabling them to escape safely.


This week on the Today Show, reporter Jeff Rossen highlighted the dangers of propane grills when used the wrong way. According to the report, the most common mistake people make when grilling is turning on the gas with the cover of the grill down. When you do that, there’s a buildup of gas, and when you hit the igniter, this trapped gas inside explodes.

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The appropriate way to start a grill is to keep the lid open before lighting it and hit the ignition switch right away, to reduce the amount of gas buildup. Another important tip is to do a soapy water test. By spraying the hoses and connections with soapy water, you’ll be able to see if you have a gas leak.

NFPA’s latest grilling press release spells out the step-by-step process for applying the soapy water test. Run through this test and the other safety tips first, before you use your grill. 

Find out more about how to keep you and your family safe this summer season by visiting NFPA's grilling safety web page


!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd348a7c970b-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd348a7c970b-120wi|alt=10 Minute|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=10 Minute|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd348a7c970b img-responsive!In Colorado, Loveland Fire Rescue Authority Deputy Fire Marshal Scott Pringle does a presentation with older adults called, “The Price is Life.” This interactive presentation, which includes NFPA’s Remembering When: A Fire and Fall Prevention Program for Older Adults , has a trivia game show-style format, PowerPoint presentation, lecture, and discussion. Pringle recently began using NFPA’s 10-minute mini-lesson on cooking fires when he gives the talk. !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73def9947970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73def9947970d-120wi|alt=Scott Pringle|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Scott Pringle|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73def9947970d img-responsive!


“We discuss the fact that cooking fires are the leading cause of home fires and home injuries, as well as tips to avoid cooking fires, how to safely put out a pan fire, what to do if your clothes catch on fire, and how to treat a burn,” he said.


The 10 minute mini-lesson is a great tool that helps guide group discussions, Pringle said. “The lesson plan helped me to ensure that all of the key concepts related to cooking fires were covered, including how to prevent them, and how to deal with them if they do occur.”


 

You’ll find additional cooking safety information on the NFPA website.


!http://i.zemanta.com/215843472_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/215843472_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Free! Remembering When™: Fire & fall prevention program for older adults now available online.

!http://i.zemanta.com/285717094_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/285717094_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!New 10-minute mini lesson on carbon monoxide safety gets you ready for your next presentation

!http://i.zemanta.com/283981666_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/283981666_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Remembering When team finds fun venue for presenting the program

!http://i.zemanta.com/245495811_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/245495811_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA Journal highlights recent conference aimed at injury prevention

 


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73decbbb4970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73decbbb4970d-320wi|alt=SMOKE ALARM GUIDE COVER SHOT|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=SMOKE ALARM GUIDE COVER SHOT|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73decbbb4970d img-responsive!The overall goal of any successful smoke alarm installation program is to save lives, says St. Louis Fire Department Battalion Chief Derrick Phillips, and evaluating the program’s effectiveness is key. Phillips is one of many officials featured in NFPA’s “Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program.” The guide, which can be downloaded at no cost from the NFPA website, helps communities plan and implement their own smoke alarm installation programs in which firefighters and trained volunteers install smoke alarms and batteries.


Phillips said his department tracks installations by ZIP code, gathers information on the number of people living in the home to identify a baseline, cross-references the information periodically to determine the number of lives saved, and conducts follow-up surveys to determine behavior changes.


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/280091469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/280091469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Updated Smoke Alarm Installation Guide offers how-to for improving safety

!http://i.zemanta.com/156074858_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/156074858_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Protect the ones you love; install photoelectric and ionization smoke alarms

!http://a2.typepad.com/6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a3fd33200a970b-320wi|src=http://a2.typepad.com/6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a3fd33200a970b-320wi|alt=Lightning fire|title=Lightning fire|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a3fd33200a970b img-responsive!

A lighting strike ignited the home's attic, sending it up in flames.



 

On Monday morning, a home in Winfield, WV, was struck by lighting and burned to the ground. According to local reports, the homeowner, Mr. Mihai Istrate, awoke to a loud boom of thunder, followed by smoke alarms sounding. He, his wife and seven-year-old son, along with their three dogs, made it out safely.


“I’m definitely thankful to have the alarm system,” said Istrate. “They save lives. Maybe they saved our lives, too.”


 

That evening, a Missouri resident awoke to the smell of smoke and sounding alarms, and promptly got his wife and seven-year-old out of the house. “Thank god for smoke detectors,” he said.


 

Once again, these real-life stories show that smoke alarms can and do make a life-saving difference.Visit NFPA’s Smoke Alarms Central page for a wealth of information on proper smoke alarm installation, maintenance and testing.</p>

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dee58bf970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dee58bf970d-320wi|alt=10 Minute|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=10 Minute|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dee58bf970d img-responsive!Fire and life safety educators are asked to speak at a variety of venues. Careful planning can make the difference between an excellent presentation and one that leaves the audience yawning.&#0160;A&#0160;10 minute mini-lesson is challenging because it requires that the presenter be effective in a short period of time. The new carbon monoxide alarms mini-lesson includes a sample lesson plan, and PowerPoint presentation. Ten-minute mini-lessons on cooking fires and smoke alarms, and a mini-lesson template are also available on the NFPA website.


!http://i.zemanta.com/285461587_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/285461587_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Carbon monoxide safety tip sheet is available in Spanish

!http://i.zemanta.com/140709618_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/140709618_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Testing CO alarms is important

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dee2aae970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dee2aae970d-800wi|alt=Sparky at Spaulding event|title=Sparky at Spaulding event|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dee2aae970d image-full img-responsive!


 

Photo courtesy of Christian Sann, Boston Harbour Association


[Sparky the Fire Dog | http://www.sparky.org/] delighted children of all ages last weekend at a health promotion and injury prevention fair. Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Charlestown, Massachusetts, hosted the fair. Exhibits focused on stroke risk assessment, bike and water safety, and fire and burn prevention.


 

Sparky handed out smoke alarm safety information and cards with his website address. Volunteers staffing the NFPA booth distributed additional fire safetymaterials. This is the first year the hospital has hosted the fair.


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/285190625_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/285190625_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!FPW printable inspires poetry

!http://i.zemanta.com/268786815_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/268786815_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Sparky takes the fire safety message on the road

!http://i.zemanta.com/275750874_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/275750874_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Smoke alarm safety is highlighted on Sparky.org

!http://i.zemanta.com/205394854_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/205394854_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA and Sparky want you to read for fire safety

NFPA and Domino’s Pizza are teaming up for the 7th year to deliver fire safety messages and pizza during FPW, October 5-11, 2014. To continue the campaign's success, we’re encouraging fire departments to join forces with their local Domino’s Pizza store and implement the program in their communities. Domino's logo

Here’s how it works: Over a one- to two-day period (it’s up to each team to decide) for an hour each day, anyone who orders a Domino’s pizza may be randomly selected to receive a surprise visit from Domino’s and the local fire department. Upon arrival, firefighters will do a smoke alarm check in the home. If the smoke alarms are working, the pizza is free. If not, firefighters will replace the batteries or install a fully functioning alarm.

Fire departments that sign up to participate in the Domino’s program this month will automatically be entered into Domino’s FPW sweepstakes. Five randomly selected winners will receive NFPA’s “FPW-in-a-Box 300”, which includes:

  • 1 FPW Banner
  • 75 FPW Posters
  • 300 Adult FPW Brochures
  • 300 Kids FPW Brochures
  • 300 FPW Stickers
  • 300 FPW Magnets
  • 300 Copies of FPW NEws
  • 300 FPW Bags

To enter the sweepstakes, complete the FPW/Domino's form and email it to jeannette.conklin@dominos.com between July 16 andJuly 31. The winners will be drawn and announced on August 8. Good luck!

 

A family of five in Charlotte, NC, was able to escape their home this past Saturday when smoke alarms woke them up, giving them the time to get out safely. More than 20 firefighters were on scene to put out the fire; the home was considered a total loss. 

The same day, another Charlotte, NC, home fire occurred in the early hours of the morning. The fire department, which credited smoke alarms with alerting the occupants, pulled one family member through a second-story window. The other three were carried down the stairs. It took 26 firefighters to bring the fire under control.

Smoke alarms save lives: Test yours every month to make sure they're working!

Call me crazy but I just learned that July is National Grilling Month! Yes, that’s right. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), this is the month to focus on all things grilling and food safety. It make sense to me because as you’ve heard us mention many times before, June and July are peak months for grilling incidents. Consider NFPA’s 2013 report on cooking equipment fires, which states that gas grills were involved in an annual average of 7,200 home fires in 2007-2001, while charcoal grills and other solid-fueled grills were responsible for an annual average of 1,400 home fires.

With all of this said, it’s so important to consider all the right moves when it comes to grilling this summer season - let's lower these statistics.Grill

To start, a list of resources can be found on the USDA grilling web page, including NFPA’s safety tips sheet and other related information to help you and your family reduce the risk of injuries. 

Parents, our new grilling infographic is another great resource to add to your arsenal. And find specific information about how to prepare your grill and properly maintain it in our latest grilling press release and on our grilling safety web page.

No matter how you slice your meat, fish or vegetables for the grill, there are safety tips and resources for everyone during National Grilling Month. Take some time out this month to celebrate our love for our favorite grilled foods but remember - always keep safety in mind!

Image credit:  North Dakota State University Extension Service

Glow Jar for shells

There’s nothing like taking a stroll on the beach on a summer day and collecting colorful treasures from the sea. Seashell collecting is a fun activity for both the kids and adults and is the topic of Sparky’s latest Cool to Do activity. Along with directions for making a glow jar for storing seashells, there’s a safety tip to remind everyone about the importance of smoke alarms.

Teatro Naturale International, an Italian weekly online magazine devoted to all things agricultural, alimentary and environmental, recently announced their 5-day professional training course for people who want to study and improve their knowledge and appreciation of olive oil, and become a certified EVOO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil) Sommelier.

OlioThe description of the course and its location (in the heart of Tuscany, in Val d’Orcia), of course has me thinking about all of the great meals I could make with olive oil, but while visions of pasta dance in my head, so is the thought of how we must all remember to cook safely with our beloved EVOO and the vast number of other oils we use such as canola, peanut and vegetable, especially when frying or sautéing.

NFPA has a number of important safety tips to consider when cooking with oil, and our cooking safety web pages also provide some important statistics about cooking with oil. Check them out and share them with your friends and family, and if you love olive oil like me, you might just want to look into Teatro Naturale’s sommelier course. Maybe I will see you there!

 


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dea0cec970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dea0cec970d-800wi|alt=Fireworks Alliance Logo|title=Fireworks Alliance Logo|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dea0cec970d image-full img-responsive!


Fourth of July festivities for 2014 have concluded, but accidents that occurred that day involving fireworks will have a lasting impact on individuals, families, and entire communities across the country.


 


According to news reports, the chief meteorologist for WXYZ Channel 7 in Detroit underwent !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd2f0d76970b-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd2f0d76970b-120wi|alt=Weatherman fireworks accident|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Weatherman fireworks accident|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd2f0d76970b img-responsive!
surgery Wednesday to remove his left eye after a fireworks accident on July 4th. Dave Rexroth was injured while vacationing with his family in Iowa City, Iowa. After his recovery he’ll be scheduled for surgery to receive a prosthetic eye.

    1. In Florida, Auburndale Fire Rescue described a fireworks accident on July 4th as one of the worst cases they’ve ever seen. Kathy Flint was hosting a party for family and friends. She went into her bedroom to grab mortar-style fireworks off the bed and they exploded. She died from her injuries the next day.

    2. A San Jose, California man had his right hand along with several fingers on his left hand blown off. Alazar Ortiz was hosting a display in his mother’s driveway when an ordnance exploded in his hands. The family told a reporter that Ortiz is a construction worker and won’t be able to earn a living because of the accident.


Many other fireworks accidents occurred on the 4th and some will likely occur in the days to come. Every 4th

of July season, there is an uptick in fires caused by consumer fireworks. NFPA, coordinator of the Alliance to Stop Consumer Fireworks, urges the public to only attend professional fireworks displays put on by trained professionals.


 

NFPA’s fireworks report and safety tip sheet provide additional information on fireworks safety.


!http://i.zemanta.com/283486950_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/283486950_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Detroit TV meteorologist loses eye in fireworks accident
!http://i.zemanta.com/281951241_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/281951241_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!As July 4 approaches, NFPA and Alliance to Stop Consumer Fireworks urge public to stay safe from fireworks
!http://i.zemanta.com/283428792_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/283428792_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Man loses a hand, 3 fingers in fireworks accident

Photo 5 Photo 3 (2)

You won’t see them competing on “America’s Next Top Model.” Nor will they be on the runways of Milan, Paris, New York, or London. But these models made quite a splash recently at the Paradise Community Center in Las Vegas. They are Las Vegas metropolitan police officers, Clark County firefighters, and NV Energy, Southwest Gas, Las Vegas Valley Water District workers, and others who participated in the public service uniform fashion show.

The fashion show, featured during the Senior Service Resource Fair, is designed to educate the public on how to identify real municipal and private-sector workers from scam artists. During the fair, representatives of the Clark County Fire Department distributed NFPA's Remembering When fire and fall prevention handouts. Firefighter/paramedic Craig Mills gave a speech on safety messages from Remembering When.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ddf580970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ddf580970c-800wi|alt=Senior Carnival 6|title=Senior Carnival 6|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511ddf580970c image-full img-responsive!


 

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At the third annual senior carnival in Warren County, Virginia, older adults participated in classic carnival games, made new friends, and listened to their favorite music. They also learned how to reduce their risk of falls in the home by improving lighting, being aware of uneven surfaces, exercising, and using non-slip bathtub mats.


 

They picked up fire prevention tips, including keeping space heaters three feet away from anything that can burn, practicing escape drills, and testing their smoke alarms .


 

The carnival was hosted by the Shenandoah Area Agency on Aging, in conjunction with Warren County Fire and Rescue. Shenandoah Area Agency on Aging Nutrition Specialist Mary Ann Gardner and Warren County Fire and Rescue Volunteer Public Fire Educator Dee Schools teamed up last year to participate in NFPA’s Remembering When™: A Fire and Fall Prevention Program for Older Adults training conference held in Boston.


Teams from the fire service and representatives of agencies that serve older adults learn effective ways to conduct presentations for older adults to help them reduce their risk of fires and falls.


The carnival was a fitting venue for Gardner and Schools to introduce Remembering When. Recently updated, the program can be downloaded at no cost from the NFPA web site.


!http://i.zemanta.com/276886759_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/276886759_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Remembering When Conference precedes NFPA Conference & Expo in Las Vegas

!http://i.zemanta.com/279608639_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/279608639_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Remembering When participants implement program in communities across North America

!http://i.zemanta.com/175830753_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/175830753_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA 2013 Remembering When™ Conference applications being accepted

Grill 2I came across a short editorial about grilling on Alabama's WAF-48 website today that I wanted to share.

In the editorial, reporter Vanessa Oubre gives "her take" on grilling safety. She reminds people that while the 4th of July has come and gone, grilling season continues, so, it's important to take precautions, use common sense and plan accordingly to help prevent injuries. Some great advice to live by. Check out Ms. Oubre's editorial and let us know what your "take" is on grilling safety. 

In the meantime, don't forget to check out some of our resources on the NFPA.org grilling web page including our newest infographic and safety tips sheet. To quote Ms. Oubre, "safety habits shouldn't be an option." Summer parties with friends and family will always be more fun when you put safety first. 

On ABC’s Good Morning America’s “Need to Know” segment the other day, Alex Perez reported on the hazards of grilling, particularly when safety protocols are not put in place. And while the report focused mainly on all of the things that can go wrong, he did point out the proper steps to take to avoid getting injured and tips to consider, including providing commentary from Hannah Storm, ESPN SportCenter’s anchor, who was severely injured while grilling for her family in 2012. During the short interview, Ms. Storm pointed out what went wrong that day and said she continues to tell her story so that others can learn from her mistake.

In 2013, Ms. Storm produced a short video with NFPA about her ordeal, the lessons she learned and the important steps people can take to stay safe while grilling.

Read Ms. Storm’s story and watch her video on NFPA's grilling safety web page or watch the video below.

 

As July is one of the peak months for grilling fires, please remember to keep an eye on what you’re cooking, and remember to follow strict instructions for firing up the grill. Check out NFPA’s latest press release, which provides these steps and more … all you need to enjoy a safe and fun grilling experience.

 


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd29e5c1970b-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd29e5c1970b-800wi|alt=Hotel Sign Big|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Hotel Sign Big|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd29e5c1970b img-responsive!Many of us will be taking mini vacations this holiday weekend. Along with safety precautions we’ll take on the road and in-flight, let’s also keep safety in mind once we reach our destination. If you plan to stay at a hotel/motel, choose one that’s protected by both smoke alarms and a fire sprinkler system. When you check in, ask the front desk what the fire alarm sounds like. When you enter the room, review the posted escape plan. For those of you planning to stay in hotel/motel accommodations that include kitchenettes, the same cooking safety tips apply as those used at home. Check out NFPA’s cooking safety information and tip sheet as well as the hotel safety tips page and hotel safety tips sheet on the NFPA website to help you keep your vacation safe and enjoyable.


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/173096285_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/173096285_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA offers new hotel and motel safety tips video

!http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Read the May issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/274861776_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/274861776_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!New NFPA infographic emphasizes smoke alarm safety information and statistics

!http://i.zemanta.com/198780340_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/198780340_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!September and October are peak months for fires in college housing; NFPA urges students to be safe

A lot has been said recently about the importance of safe grilling, especially with the Fourth of July weekend coming up. So as we get closer to the holiday, here’s a reminder for everyone to please play it safe! With family, friends and lots of activity around you, it’s easy to get sidetracked and forget the important stuff like utilizing safe cooking practices.   Grilling

So in lieu of writing another long list of safety tips and statistics, I thought I’d pass along our top tips to keep in mind as you fire up the grill this holiday weekend:

  • Keep an eye on what you’re grilling. Not only will you save your favorite foods from burning, you reduce the risk of accidentally starting a fire.
  • Keep children and pets, and anything that can catch fire like dish towels or pot holders away from your cooking area.
  • Be alert when you’re cooking. It’s easy to get caught up in the festivities and not be aware of what’s happening on or near the grill. Staying focused reduces your risk for injuries.

Of course, additional resources can always be found on NFPA's website. Our grilling safety messages, downloadable tips sheet and infographic are easy to print out and keep handy as you prepare for your family festivities. I urge you to take a look.

Have a safe and happy Fourth of July!

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd291b04970b-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd291b04970b-800wi|alt=Fireworks Tent|title=Fireworks Tent|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd291b04970b image-full img-responsive!


 

As the Fourth of July approaches, fireworks tents are dotting the American landscape, giving some consumers easy access to the explosive devices. However, fireworks are not safe in the hands of consumers. According to NFPA’s Fireworks Report, in 2012, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 8,700 people for fireworks related injuries; 55% of 2012 emergency room fireworks-related injuries were to the extremities and 31% were to the head.


 

[NFPA | http://www.nfpa.org/] is the coordinator of the&#0160;Alliance to Stop Consumer Fireworks, which comprises nearly 25 national and state organizations that work together to help keep the public safe from consumer fireworks. The Alliance urges people to only attend public fireworks displays&#0160;put on by trained professionals.


 

In an educational video, NFPA’s Dan Doofus urges people not to use consumer fireworks. You can read more about fireworks safety on the fireworks safety tip sheet, fireworks fact sheet, and the fireworks page on the NFPA website.


!http://i.zemanta.com/101977512_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/101977512_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!NFPA warns about the dangers of consumer fireworks

!http://i.zemanta.com/274251917_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/274251917_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Boys playing with fireworks accidentally set fire to middle school

!http://i.zemanta.com/281951241_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/281951241_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!As July 4 approaches, NFPA and Alliance to Stop Consumer Fireworks urge public to stay safe from fireworks

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