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2014

 

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More than 70 students were packed into a Kansas fraternity house this week when a fire erupted on the third-floor living area. More than 30 firefighters responded to the blaze, which was initiated by the improper disposal of smoking materials, according to a story on FireEngineering.com. All occupants escaped safely.


The structure is no stranger to fire; construction on the bulding's interior two years earlier initiated a previous blaze. The residents escaped injury, but others who have encountered fire have not been as fortunate.


[The Center for Campus Fire Safety (CCFS) | http://www.campusfiresafety.org/] notes that there have been 86 fatal fires documented in Greek housing, college campuses, and off-campus housing since 2000 that have claimed more than 120 lives. The majority of those deaths occurred in off-campus settings. 


 

CCFS is urging students, particularly those moving out of the dorms and into a house for the first time, to exercise caution and heed the lessons of previous tragedies. Learn how by visiting NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative blog.


!http://i.zemanta.com/260127891_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/260127891_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Valiant effort by college student fails to save his friend from a house fire

!http://i.zemanta.com/283745044_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/283745044_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=padding: 0; margin: 0; border: 0; display: block; width: 80px; max-width: 100%;!Dynamic duo: Smoke alarms and residential sprinklers credited for saving a teen's life

As the Labor Day weekend holiday fast approaches, it stands to reason that our conversations (re)turn to menus, parties and yes, grilling! That's why I couldn't help but giggle at this latest article in Newsweek, which totally caught my eye ... see if you  can answer the question: Are Women Better Grillers than Men? Apparently, there is a lot of controversy over this one. Grilling 3

So, while you ponder what the answer is to this mighty question (and please, be kind to your friends, spouses and party guests of the opposite sex as you firmly state your case!), just remember, no matter who takes the reigns over the grill this weekend, please play it safe.

According to NFPA reports, in 2007-2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 8,800 home and outside fires. These 8,800 fires caused an annual average of 10 civilian deaths, 140 civilian injuries and $96 million in direct property damage.

Other sobering statistics: gas grills constitute a higher risk, having been involved in an annual average of 7,200 home fires in 2007-2011, while charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were involved in an annual average of 1,400 home fires.

So, all of this is to say that wherever your party plans take you this weekend, do the right thing when you're around the grill. Keep in mind that such things as drinking alcohol, kids playing nearby, dogs barking, and friends stopping to say a few words while you cook, are all distractions that force you to take your eye off the ball. What to do? NFPA's got a great grilling safety tips sheet that you can download and review or tape to your fridge to serve as that all-important (daily) reminder.

This Labor Day weekend, of course, have a blast, but always keep your safety, and the safety of friends and family first and foremost in your mind. Visit our grilling safety web page for more tips and resources to help ensure you have a great holiday weekend!

And by the way...Do let us know the results of the above grilling question. Tell us how your informal poll turned out. Comment on our Facebook page today! Enjoy!

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c6d43fd2970b-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c6d43fd2970b-800wi|alt=Kellyransdell head shot|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Kellyransdell head shot|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c6d43fd2970b img-responsive!I am pleased to introduce Kelly Ransdell as the newest contributor to the Safety Source blog. As the southern regional advisor to the NFPA Public Education Division, she works with state educators in 11 southern states to assist with fire and life safety information. She is a liaison to the states for workshops, conferences, current events, new initiatives, and outreach to the grassroots fire service. She is also Deputy Director of the Prevention and Programs Division of the North Carolina Department of Insurance, Office of the State Fire Marshal, and the State Director of Safe Kids North Carolina, overseeing all injury prevention programs across North Carolina. She serves on the NFPA 1035 committee and worked on the advisory committee of the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors. Go to the "comment" button below to offer your feedback or suggestions for future topics. Here is her inaugural post. Check this blog for additional insights from Kelly.


I recently had the opportunity to participate in the 22nd Tennessee Public Fire Education Conference held in Murfreesboro, attended by nearly 50 educators from across the state. Members of the Tennessee Public Fire and Life Safety Educator’s Association have seen a dramatic increase in conference attendance because of the new ISO standards that allow fire prevention education to contribute to ratings at fire departments.


 

Session topics included NFPA’s Remembering When™: A Fire and Fall Prevention Program for Older Adults, hoarding and fire safety, educational messaging, Firewise , and what’s new in public education.


 

During a session on educational messaging, we had an interesting discussion on smoke alarms. An educator from Cookeville Fire Department in Tennessee showed the group a smoke alarm installed in a home between 1979-1983. We actually googled the manufacturer to find out more details. The older-model alarm provided a great opener for our discussion and may work well for other public educators. We went on to talk about smoke alarm messaging , replacement, and techniques for canvassing a community for a smoke alarm installation program.


I’d like to extend a big “thank you” to Tennessee for your commitment to fire and life safety education.


!http://i.zemanta.com/293967442_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/293967442_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Infographic highlights cooking appliances and smoke alarms

!http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Read the May issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/284311755_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/284311755_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!In the new NFPA Journal, "In Compliance" looks at emergency messages in large assembly occupancies

!http://i.zemanta.com/108713583_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/108713583_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA 1035 gives guidelines to increase skills of fire-safety educators

NFPA has created a new cooking safety infographic for you to use on your website, in blogs and newsletters, and on your Facebook and Twitter platforms. The graphic speaks to an important message when it comes to cooking at home:  Install smoke alarms at least 10 feet away from cooking appliances. This includes built-in microwaves, stoves and ranges. 

CookingTake a look around your kitchen? Where does your smoke alarm reside? Use our handy infographic to help guide you!

Just download the graphic and place it wherever you want to use it. And don't forget to share it with your friends and family. More information about cooking safety can be found on NFPA's cooking safety web pages.

For additional resources and safety tips regarding smoke alarms, visit NFPA's Smoke Alarm Central web page where you'll find reports, videos, tip sheets and more.

It also just so happens that this year's Fire Prevention Week (FPW) theme is: Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month. Learn more about how smoke alarms can help keep you and your family safer from fire, including using this 10' rule when it comes to your appliances in the kitchen. Check out our FPW web page for great resources like videos, worksheets, and artwork to promote your safety campaign.

And don't forget to share your stories with us. We'd love to hear from you!

Dining
According to a news article out of the U.K., cooking is a major cause of accidental fires in homes in North Wales. As a result, the North Wales Fire and Rescue Service is launching a new campaign, "We Don't Want to Come Dine with You - Think Safe, Cook Safe!," to help drive down the number of cooking-related fires in the area, and educate residents about the importance of cooking safely. A major focus of the campaign includes the dangers of leaving your cooking unattended. Sound familiar? We thought so. 

As you know from an NFPA cooking fires report, from 2007 - 2011 unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in kitchen-related fires in the U.S. So, what are a couple of easy things you can do to stay on top of your cooking? NFPA recommends the following:

  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.

Find out more about cooking safely on NFPA's web pages.

As Gwyn Jones from the North Wales Fire and Rescue Service says in the article, "It is our responsibility to do everything we can to highlight that cooking causes a high number of house fires and to try and drive our messages home. But when it comes to changing behaviour to keep safe, we can only advice and then it is up to you, the individual, to make sure you heed our advice."

Sound words to live by. So what are you doing to keep accidents at bay in the kitchen? Share you stories with us. We'd love to hear your success story! 

FIRE PIT IMAGEDuring a recent Saturday I spent a lovely afternoon with friends at a Cape Cod waterfront resort. The grounds were breathtaking and terraced. The resort’s restaurant overlooked a patio, cabanas, and two beaches. Sailboats bobbed in the distance. The afternoon started out in the mid-80s, but by dusk the temperature dropped to the 60s and the wind picked up.

I looked down from my restaurant table and saw tall flames flickering from a large, circular fire pit in the center of the patio. Eager to warm themselves, about a dozen resort guests gathered around the fire pit; some sat with their backs to it on its stone ledge. My friends, who know I work for NFPA, suggested tongue-in-cheek that I leave my meal, run down the stairs and alert the guests to keep a safe distance from the fire pit. I didn’t have to. Pretty soon, a man and his son jumped off the ledge, rubbing their backs. Other guests moved away too.

As summer winds down, we’ll likely see more use of fire pits and other portable fireplaces. It’s important to follow safety rules, including keeping anything that can burn at least three feet away. You can check out additional information on portable fireplace safety and our tip sheet on the NFPA web site.

 

  !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d05c99c8970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d05c99c8970c-800wi|alt=Sparky and big tractor (3)|title=Sparky and big tractor (3)|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d05c99c8970c image-full img-responsive!
The Missouri State Fair, held earlier this month in Sedalia, Missouri, featured hands-on activities, competitions, thrilling amusement rides, and world-class entertainment. One of the most enthusiastic participants was Sparky the Fire Dog . He played Frisbee with the kids, rode a mechanical bull, washed windows at a lemonade stand, and even climbed aboard a tractor.


 

Most important of all, he and his helpers provided fair goers of all ages with fire safety information on smoke alarms and escape planning . !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d05c99ad970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d05c99ad970c-320wi|alt=Sparky and State Trooper 2 (3)|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Sparky and State Trooper 2 (3)|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d05c99ad970c img-responsive!


 

“Sparky walked the crowd and even posed for photos with our state legislators and state police,” said Inspector/Public Education Specialist Lianne Stone with the Missouri Division of Fire Safety. Stone is also an NFPA Public Education network representative.  “The state fair was a great venue for Sparky to get important information to people during the brief time that he had with them.”


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/285717101_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/285717101_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky is a big hit at safety fair

!http://i.zemanta.com/271254938_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/271254938_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky goes on camera to remind kids about an important fire safety lesson

!http://i.zemanta.com/268786815_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/268786815_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky takes the fire safety message on the road

This short but to-the-point article in an Australian newspaper reminded me that no matter where we live in the world, fire safety is and should remain one of our top priorities.

According to The Advertiser, a food service worker from the Indian Masala restaurant, located in a small shopping center, had accidentally left a wok on, filled with oil, after service finished for the night. The oil continued to heat up until it ignited and set fire to the restaurant causing $100,000 worth of damage. Thankfully, no one was injured, but it did cause smoke damage to the nearby shops. Wok

It's easy to forget or ignore the easy things when we're in the throes of our busy lives, but let's see if we can remember these three simple, but life saving messages: 

  • Keep an eye on what you fry
  • Be alert when cooking
  • Keep things that can catch fire away from cooking area

According to NFPA, unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in cooking fires. So please, stay close to the kitchen when you're preparing your meals, and after you've finished, check and recheck that all stove burners and the oven have been turned off. You don't want what happened at this local restaurant to happen at your house.

For more great information about cooking safety, check NFPA's web pages where you'll find tip sheets, checklists and other great resources that will help you and your family keep fire safety forever on the front burner!

Honolulu Fire Department HeadquartersHonolulu firefighters are reminding residents to test their smoke alarms to make sure they’re working. Interviewed recently by local television station KITV, Honolulu Fire Department Battalion Chief Terry Seelig stated that 70 to 80 percent of homes have smoke alarms, but of those, only 70 to 80 percent have ones that work.

Schools have joined in the public awareness effort and are creating murals to be displayed at fire stations throughout Oahu during Fire Prevention Week. More information on smoke alarms is available on NFPA’s smoke alarm page.

Smoke_alarmWhile smoke alarm success stories are powerful reminders of the potentially life-saving difference working smoke alarms can make, there are just as many home fire incidents in the news where dead or missing smoke alarm batteries, or a lack of smoke alarms altogether, carry deadly consequences.

That was the case in Milwaukee, WI, early yesterday morning, when a man died after a kitchen fire broke out in his apartment. There were no working smoke alarms in the unit.

According to Deputy Chief Aaron Lipski of the Milwaukee Fire Department, yesterday's fire death represents an unfortunate pattern for the city. “Every fire related fatality this year in the city of Milwaukee has been in a place that’s had no working smoke detector,” he said.

Clearly, smoke alarms play a pivotal role in home fires. When working properly, they can save lives. When they’re not, the consequences can be deadly.

So remember these basics: Test your smoke alarms each month, change the batteries annually, and replace all smoke alarms in your home every ten years. For more information on smoke alarms, visit NFPA’s Smoke Alarms Central page.

As I looked at my calendar this morning I thought … wow, can we really be this deep into August already!? Well, for some of us, we know what the middle of the month means; waving goodbye to beach parties and saying hello to college exams. This year, as you write out a list of what you need to take to school, why not add something new to that list, something you might not have thought about before … NFPA’s Campus Fire Safety infographic!

CampusThe infographic is a great way to remind you and your friends about the importance of fire safety while living away from home. Go ahead, download it and post it to your bulletin board or keep it on your desk for quick reference.

Remember, September and October are peak months for fires in college housing so as you settle into your new "digs", please use this time to pay close attention to your surroundings and follow NFPA’s safety tips so you’ll always know how to prevent fires, check smoke alarms and prepare escape plans. You can find the infographic and all of our resources on NFPA’s campus fire safety webpages created for students and their parents.

And stay tuned right here to our Safety Source blog where we’ll highlight one post per week in September and October on specific things you can do to stay safer on campus.

This fall, make it a point to keep you and your roommates and friends safe. Got questions? Contact NFPA at education@nfpa.org to learn more.

Fundraising Installation ProgramAn essential component of a smoke alarm installation program is supplies: smoke alarms, batteries, ladders, drills, and other equipment. Many fire departments seek donations from local businesses to get the supplies they need. Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program has great suggestions for how to identify businesses that can help and how to approach them.

You can download the guide for free from the NFPA website and also review additional smoke alarm materials on the smoke alarm page.

  Campus safety

The start of autumn sees falling leaves, amber skies and pumpkin pies. But the end of summer also signals, for students across the country, the beginning of fall semester. While trying to navigate living in their new dorms and off-campus apartment, there are a lot of students who set off the fire alarm. And with an estimated average of 3,810 structure fires in college housing between 2007 and 2011, September and October are essentially peak months for fires in college housing.  

The Center for Campus Safety, with the intention of educating incoming students on fire safety, has marked September of every year as Campus Fire Safety Month.

The following are fire safety tips from the NFPA that can help college students living on their own:

  1. Try to find a fully sprinklered house when looking for a dorm or off-campus housing
  2. Double check that the building has interconnected smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom, and on every floor.
  3. Learn your building’s evacuation plan and practice all fire drills

The NFPA has published a report, “Structure Fires in Dormitories, Fraternities, Sororities and Barracks” that essentially says that 70 percent of fires begin in the cooking area and that fires are most common in the evening between 5 p.m. and 11 p.m...

A significant number of fires usually happen when a hot stove is left unattended. Students are advised to stay in the kitchen and be alert while preparing meals and to remember to test their smoke alarms every month.

Speaking of which, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!” is the theme for NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week 2014! The annual awareness campaign will be held this year on October 5-11. So information and resources that can help students learn about fire safety can be found of the Fire Prevention Week website.

Sparky bday surpriseSparky’s Birthday Surprise, a new storybook app, was selected as a 2014 Parents’ Choice Award winner by the Parents’ Choice Foundation, the nation’s oldest nonprofit consumer guide to quality children’s media!

Sparky’s Birthday Surprise teaches kids ages 3-6 important fire safety skills. The app is jam-packed with learning games, activities, coloring pages, and a sing-a-long. With bright graphics and kid-friendly “tappable” animations throughout, the app is aligned to Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Math.

In the app, it's Sparky's birthday, and his friends are planning a surprise party. While enjoying this interactive, animated story, kids learn what to do if the smoke alarm sounds, how to exit the home safely, and how to choose an outside meeting place with their family. Also included is a special section for caregivers, which offers thoughtful questions designed to spark open-ended conversation and reinforce reading comprehension.

The Parents’ Choice Awards are designed to help parents and caregivers make informed decisions about which new products are right for their children. This app is available in English and Spanish and can be found on the iTunes App Store, Amazon App Store for Android, Google Play and the Barnes & Noble App Store for NOOK TM or www.sparkyschoolhouse.org.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfb4a31970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfb4a31970d-120wi|alt=Parentschoice LOGO|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Parentschoice LOGO|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfb4a31970d img-responsive!Sparky’s Birthday Surprise app has a Parents’ Choice® Award. Parents’ Choice Foundation serves as a trusted and independent source for educators and librarians, journalists, and families searching for quality children’s media and toys. !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f01686970c-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f01686970c-120wi|alt=Sparky face|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Sparky face|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f01686970c img-responsive!


During the lengthy screening process Sparky’s Birthday Surprise app was evaluated on design and function, educational value, long-term play value, and benefits to a child’s social and emotional growth and well-being.


 

The Sparky the Fire Dog website received a Parents’ Choice Award in 2013


!http://i.zemanta.com/203324869_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/203324869_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky the Fire Dog website wins Parents' Choice Award!

!http://i.zemanta.com/205394854_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/205394854_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA and Sparky want you to read for fire safety

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c6cb8298970b-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c6cb8298970b-320wi|alt=Capture 2|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Capture 2|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c6cb8298970b img-responsive!Kids can make their own custom pencils this month on Sparky.org . This craft is easy to do at after-school programs and open houses. It provides an opportunity to have kids create a home fire escape plan with an outside meeting place with their new pencils! It also includes a Sparky safety tip and a chance to crack Sparky’s secret code!


!http://i.zemanta.com/195383427_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/195383427_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky's back to school plastic fantastic pencil pouch

!http://i.zemanta.com/237502704_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/237502704_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky's cool-to-do activity for January; Make a winter wonderland

!http://i.zemanta.com/205394854_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/205394854_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA and Sparky want you to read for fire safety

!http://i.zemanta.com/275750874_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/275750874_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Smoke alarm safety is highlighted on Sparky.org

!http://i.zemanta.com/203307696_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/203307696_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Sparky the Fire Dog website wins Parents' Choice Award!

!http://i.zemanta.com/187269265_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/187269265_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!July issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education e-newsletter is now available

We’re deep into the month of August and we know lots of families are taking advantage of the warm summer days to set off on camping trips and outside excursions before heading back to school. Here’s some great information for parents to remember from the Kohl’s Cares Grow Safe & Healthy Program (a partnership between Kohl’s Cares and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin), as they enjoy the great outdoors:

  • Establish a three-foot, “kid-free zone” around grills and fire pits. Teach children and their friends this rule and always watch children who are near a fire.
  • Be aware of weather patterns and overall outdoor conditions. Never build a fire in hazardous, windy or dry conditions.
  • Never leave the fire unattended, not even for a minute.

There are lots of other tips, too, to help ensure your family's safety. Check out these and more from the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service.

Ever consider the consequences of leaving your campfire unattended? Drought conditions and high temperatures are plaguing most of the west leaving forests bone dry; it's easy for a fire to ignite in the wrong place if we don't pay attention. One of my latest blogs entitled, "How to keep your campfire from becoming a wildfire" provides additional campfire safety info from the Keep Oregon Green Association. Campfire

In most cases, camping goes hand-in-hand with grilling. Don't forget, you can find grilling safety info on NFPA's grilling safety web page, including a downloadable tips sheet that you can take with you on your travels. 

So, as summer surges ahead, please remember to keep safety top of mind when venturing out. And let us know if you have any questions. NFPA's here to help!

 


 


 

If you’re looking for a great tool that provides all of the essentials about smoke alarms, you’ll want to view the Home Smoke Alarm Basics video, free on the smoke alarm page of the NFPA website. The video describes the type of alarm that should be used for the best protection, the importance of choosing an alarm that has the label of a recognized testing laboratory, alarm placement, testing, maintenance, and special features.


Just over two minutes in length, the video gives you what you need to know quickly and can be a great teaching tool for spreading the word about smoke alarm safety.


!http://i.zemanta.com/265822773_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/265822773_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Child uses his savings to buy smoke alarms

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/274861776_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/274861776_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!New NFPA infographic emphasizes smoke alarm safety information and statistics

!http://i.zemanta.com/291168803_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/291168803_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Fire department shares tips for reaching residents with smoke alarms

!http://i.zemanta.com/284311755_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/284311755_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!In the new NFPA Journal, "In Compliance" looks at emergency messages in large assembly occupancies

 

College campus dorms and off-campus housing will soon be filled with students embarking on their !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dffd71c970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dffd71c970d-320wi|alt=Campussafety|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Campussafety|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dffd71c970d img-responsive!first college experience or returning from summer break. Along with getting acclimated to a new class schedule, social activities, and the campus culture, it’s important for students to know what to do in case of emergency. They can start by taking a few minutes to make sure they are living in a fire-safe environment, following NFPA safety tips.
• Make sure the dormitory or apartment has smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside every sleeping area and on each level.
• Test all smoke alarms at least monthly.
• Learn the building’s evacuation plan and practice all drills as if they were the real thing.
NFPA’s updated College Campus Fire Safety tips sheet and campus and dorm fires safety page have additional advice for keeping students safe from fire.


!http://i.zemanta.com/198780340_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/198780340_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!September and October are peak months for fires in college housing; NFPA urges students to be safe

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/291168803_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/291168803_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Fire department shares tips for reaching residents with smoke alarms

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd4100f6970b-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd4100f6970b-120wi|alt=SMOKE ALARM GUIDE COVER SHOT|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=SMOKE ALARM GUIDE COVER SHOT|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd4100f6970b img-responsive!The Seattle Fire Department finds that door-to-door canvassing is one of the best ways to reach residents who need smoke alarms installed. William Mace, Seattle Fire Department Education and Outreach Coordinator says that canvassing helps to build trust in the community and allows firefighters to hear directly from residents.


 

You can read more about steps the Seattle Fire Department takes to ensure effective canvassing in Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program. In addition, NFPA’s smoke alarm page includes safety tip sheets, statistics, videos, and other information about smoke alarms.


!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/288354215_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/288354215_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Milwaukee Fire Department installs smoke alarms, reaches out to community

!http://i.zemanta.com/280091469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/280091469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Updated Smoke Alarm Installation Guide offers how-to for improving safety

!http://i.zemanta.com/289617410_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/289617410_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Fire official discusses a key element to a successful smoke alarm installation program

!http://i.zemanta.com/288165600_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/288165600_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Fire officials offer helpful hints for successful smoke alarm installation programs

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfdd0a9970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfdd0a9970d-320wi|alt=Number 1|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Number 1|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfdd0a9970d img-responsive!St. Louis has been named the most fire safe metropolitan city in the Midwest by an insurance organization. According to CBS Radio, HomeownersInsurance.com ranked the 10 largest Midwest metros, outlining residential fire risk, preparedness, and response time to fires. St. Louis was given high marks for having a high percentage of homes with updated electrical and HVAC units. The report also noted St. Louis for the percentage of smoke-free households–84.9 percent.


 

“The designation as the most fire safe city in the Midwest means a great deal to the city of St. Louis,” says St. Louis Fire Department Battalion Chief Derrick Phillips, a member of NFPA’s Urban Fire and Life Safety Task Force. “The report shows that when a community comes together to tackle a serious issue, such as fire, the rewards are great. The citizens and firefighters are safer due to a decreased fire rate. For the St. Louis Fire Department, it proves that the work in fire prevention and community outreach have been successful in changing behaviors and curtailing potential fire related problems.”


 

Cities were also ranked on the percentage of households with smoke alarms . Chief Phillips added that the fire department’s smoke alarm installation program, which is featured in NFPA’s Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program, has been instrumental in getting fire safety messages to the public to elicit behavior change.


The report lists Chicago in second place and Indianapolis in third for the ranking.


!http://i.zemanta.com/290209476_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/290209476_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Report: St. Louis Most Fire Safe City in Midwest

!http://i.zemanta.com/118016908_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/118016908_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Cooking equipment remains top cause of home structure fires according to NFPA report

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Read the May issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/289125577_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/289125577_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Test your smoke alarm knowledge with the 2014 Fire Prevention Week quiz!

Domino's logoDomino's Pizza today announced the five fire departments that were randomly selected to receive "FPW-in-a-Box 300" after signing up to particpate in the Fire Prevention Week/Domino's campaign this October. Here are the winners:

  • Assistant Chief Shane Gibbs - Oconee County Emergency Services/Walhalla, SC
  • Michael McAuliffe - Harvey Vol. Fire Co. No. 2/Harvey, LA
  • Chief Michael Vaughn - Washington Fire Dept./Washington, IL
  • LT Tom Mangiameli - Hoffman Estates Fire Department/Hoffman Estates, IL
  • Battalion Chief Rudy Khalaf - District 2 Fire/Rescue/San Antonio, TX

Congratulations to all of you! Once again, thanks to the nearly 60 fire departments across the country that have already signed on to participate in the program.

If you're a fire department that would like to implement the campaign in your community but haven't signed up yet, don't worry - there's still time! Simply fill out the downloadable form and send it to Jeannette Conklin at jeannette.conklin@dominos.com.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f291e2970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f291e2970c-320wi|alt=Lntbclassroom|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Lntbclassroom|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f291e2970c img-responsive!The Nashville Fire Department is working with the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools to ensure local students have the ability to stay safe in the event of fire. In a charge lead by Assistant Fire Chief, Manuel Fonseca, and school leaders, all students in pre-K through grade 2 will be taught lessons from the Learn Not to Burn (LNTB) program. This initiative involves 1,200 classroom teachers across the Nashville school district to implement the program. Online access to materials make it easy for teachers to use the Learn Not to Burn program. Additionally, LNTB updates to address the academic needs reflected in the Common Core Standards through engaging and developmentally-appropriate strategies help pave the way for the program roll out. 
 


!http://i.zemanta.com/145687349_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/145687349_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA adapts its Learn Not to Burn children's program for Grade 1 students

!http://i.zemanta.com/145690691_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/145690691_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA adapts its Learn Not to Burn children's program for Grade 1 students

!http://i.zemanta.com/135384341_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/135384341_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA has revised and updated its preschool program, Learn Not to Burn

!http://i.zemanta.com/133003491_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/133003491_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA has revised and updated its award-winning preschool program, Learn Not to Burn

!http://i.zemanta.com/272610869_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/272610869_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!New Learn Not to Burn curriculum for fire and life safety engages young children's varied learning styles

I was pouring through some materials in a folder here on my desk when I came across an NFPA brochure on cooking from 2006! At first I chuckled at the date, but as I looked at the cool little checklist at the back of the brochure, I thought, you know, no matter where we are in years, taking steps to stay safe from fire and other hazards is, and will continue to be, an important and timeless activity. 

As a parent, take a moment to share these small, but oh, so important tips with your kids, and see if you can answer all the questions with a resounding "Yes!" 

Cooking
Daily Checklist for Cooking Safety:

* Does a grown-up watch the stovetop when he or she is frying food?

* Do the grown-ups in your home pay attention to the food that is cooking?

* Is the fire department emergency number near the phone?

* Is your home's fire escape plan somewhere where everyone can see it? Have you practiced the plan?

* Are small appliances unplugged when they are not being used?

* Is the top of the stove clean? No spilled food, grease, paper or bags?

* Are things that can burn, like dish towels, curtains or paper at least 3 feet away from the stove?

* Are pot holders or oven mitts easy for grown-ups to reach when they are cooking?

* Do children and pets stay out of the "kid-free zone" (3 feet from stove) when a grown-up is cooking?

How did you do? If you didn't answer all the questions with a "yes," don't worry, you can find more information and additional safety tips on NFPA's cooking fire safety central web page that can help get you back on the path to safety. And don't forget, you can always download the tips sheet or infographic and hang it right on your fridge as a daily reminder for everyone to see! 

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f220c9970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f220c9970c-800wi|alt=Carsafety|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Carsafety|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f220c9970c img-responsive!Summer travel season is in high gear. Millions of motorists are on the road. Keeping your vehicle properly maintained and serviced could not only reduce your chances of a breakdown, but also prevent a car fire. NFPA’s vehicle safety tips provide important reminders.


    • Have your car serviced regularly by a professionally trained mechanic. If you spot leaks, your car is not running properly; get it checked.

    • Never park a car where flammables, such as grass, are touching the catalytic converter.

    • Drive safely to avoid an accident.


 

The tips sheetalso includes the danger signs to look for in your car and what to do if your car is on fire. You can check out all of the safety tips sheets on the NFPA website.


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!
!http://i.zemanta.com/272443677_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/272443677_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!June and July are peak months for grilling accidents; be mindful of safety

In anticipation of our annual FPW campaign with Domino’s Pizza, Domino's hosted a sweepstakes last month, which worked to jumpstart fire department participation in the program. Domino's logo

From July 16 to 31, fire departments that committed to implementing the FPW/Domino's campaign in their communities were automatically entered into the sweepstakes. Five randomly selected winners will receive NFPA’s "FPW-in-a-Box 300”, which includes a host of FPW products and materials.

A tremendous thank you to the nearly 60 fire departments that already signed on! The sweepstakes winners will be officially announced this Friday, August 8, on NFPA’s FPW website, Facebook and Twitter, so stay tuned!

For fire departments that haven’t signed up yet but would like to implement the program locally, there’s still time. Download the FPW/Domino's participation form and email it to Jeannette Conklin at jeannette.conklin@dominos.com. You can also visit NFPA’s FPW/Domino’s page to learn more about the campaign and how to get involved. (Remember: Fire Prevention Week is just two months away!)

!http://a6.typepad.com/6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a511f14566970c-450wi|src=http://a6.typepad.com/6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a511f14566970c-450wi|alt=Steve Weatherford|style=width: 450px;|title=Steve Weatherford|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a01a73dad0bd2970d01a511f14566970c img-responsive!

NY Giants' Steve Weatherford and the owners of his training facility donated 1,000 smoke alarms this week after learning about a fatal home fire in Newark, NJ, where no smoke alarms were present. From left to right: Fire Chief Robert Flanagan, Morristown Fire Department; Steve Weatherford, NY Giants punter; Lisa and Dan Schauger, Next Level Training owners



 

When New York Giants’ punter, Steve Weatherford, heard that six people died in a home fire where no smoke alarms were present, he stepped up to make a difference.


"When I learned that it could have been prevented if the family had a fire detector in the house, that was when I realized we needed to raise awareness – and provide fire detectors to families who cannot afford them – to make sure that doesn’t happen again,” said Weatherford.


 

[Six family members in Newark, NJ, died from smoke and carbon monoxide poisoning | http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2014/08/newark_fatal_fire_inspires_giants_punter_trainers_to_donate_smoke_alarms.html#comments] this past Father’s Day when a fire, reportedly fueled by flammable plastic flowers on the front porch, spread throughout the home. After learning about the incident, Weatherford and his training facility, Next Level Training, decided to take action and make a difference.


 

Through their efforts, 1,000 smoke alarms will be distributed to needy families with help from the Morristown Fire Department. "We're glad they'll be put to good use," said Weatherford.


Weatherford noted that the deaths in this fire incident were as tragic as they were preventable. Kudos to him for not only understanding the life-saving difference smoke alarms can make, but actively working to help make people safer from fire. Definitely a fire safety hero in my book!


 

Visit NFPA&#39;s smoke alarms section for a wealth of tips and information on installing, testing and&#0160;maintaining&#0160;smoke alarms.</p>

 

&#0160;&#0160; !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f01d0c970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f01d0c970c-800wi|alt=Network Map|title=Network Map|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f01d0c970c image-full img-responsive!

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd4031d6970b-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd4031d6970b-800wi|alt=2014PublicEducationNetwork|title=2014PublicEducationNetwork|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a3fd4031d6970b image-full img-responsive!
Public fire safety professionals from&#0160;each state and province&#0160;serve in NFPA&#39;s Public Education Network. Working closely with&#0160;the Public Education Advisors, the network representatives provide support to local fire and life safety educators, sharing ideas, resolving challenges, and recognizing accomplishments related to fire safety education.


 

Check out the new map featuring the activities of the Public Education Network. It’s chock-full of great ideas educators can use to enhance their fire and life safety programs.


!http://i.zemanta.com/175445495_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/175445495_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA's Public Education Advisors at the 2013 Conference and Expo in Chicago

!http://i.zemanta.com/178096523_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/178096523_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA Public Education Network Meets in Chicago

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df7be9f970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df7be9f970d-800wi|alt=Columbu Ohio Fire Department Seal|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Columbu Ohio Fire Department Seal|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df7be9f970d img-responsive!Having the trust of the community is essential to a successful smoke alarm installation program, says Columbus (Ohio) Fire Department Lieutenant David Sawyer. Columbus is challenged by neighborhood youth gangs, violent crime, and drug activity. The department builds coalitions to establish the trust needed to get smoke alarms installed where needed.


 

Lt. Sawyer says he has attended neighborhood civic association, block watch, and faith-based institution meetings in uniform to assure residents that the fire department is invested in the community. You can read more of his thoughts on keeping the community safe in Planning & Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program, which is available on the smoke alarm safety page on the NFPA website.


!http://i.zemanta.com/288354215_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/288354215_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Milwaukee Fire Department installs smoke alarms, reaches out to community

!http://i.zemanta.com/286729224_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/286729224_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!St. Louis fire official says smoke alarm installation programs help save lives

!http://i.zemanta.com/156074858_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/156074858_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Protect the ones you love; install photoelectric and ionization smoke alarms

Fire ChallengeThe National Fire Protection Association is joining the Phoenix Society warning of a new “fire challenge” trending on YouTube and social media.  We have experience with the effects of fire, understand the devastating impact of fire on lives, and hope our efforts to warn youth through our social media network will prevent future injuries and deaths from this dangerous activity. A burn injury resulting in life long scarring and possible death can occur in seconds.

2014 FPW quiz
The 2014 Fire Prevention Week theme is "Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives; Test Yours Every Month." As a fun way to learn all about smoke alarm safety, we have developed a short trivia quiz for our website. Take the quiz on our website and afterwards, continue to click through to see what the correct answers were to any you may have answered incorrectly. Also, be sure to share your results on Facebook and Twitter.

Take the Fire Prevention Week quiz now!

Many people don’t test their smoke alarms as often as they should, but when there is a fire, smoke spreads fast. Working smoke alarms provide the time needed to get out safely. For further educational material and tip sheets on smoke alarms, visit the Fire Prevention Week website.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df8a952970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df8a952970d-800wi|alt=Fire Safety House|title=Fire Safety House|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73df8a952970d image-full img-responsive!


 

Brentwood Fire &amp; Rescue Department in Tennessee has a new fire safety house. According to The Tennessean, the educational trailer is set to bring fire safety lessons to local schools this fall. The custom-built trailer has warming interior doors to teach children to feel for heat when opening doors, and sprinkler head, fireplace, and stovetop cooking props.


In addition, it has features for people with disabilities, including a bed shaker, a smoke alarm for people with disabilities–and for the first time–a floor plan compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act and integrated wheelchair ramp to give children using wheelchairs full access. The fire department made the purchase with the help of a FEMA grant.


 

NFPA provides educational materials for people with disabilities, information on&#0160;smoke alarms&#0160;and safety tips on the website


!http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Read the May issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/198780340_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/198780340_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!September and October are peak months for fires in college housing; NFPA urges students to be safe

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