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!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfdd0a9970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfdd0a9970d-320wi|alt=Number 1|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Number 1|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a73dfdd0a9970d img-responsive!St. Louis has been named the most fire safe metropolitan city in the Midwest by an insurance organization. According to CBS Radio, HomeownersInsurance.com ranked the 10 largest Midwest metros, outlining residential fire risk, preparedness, and response time to fires. St. Louis was given high marks for having a high percentage of homes with updated electrical and HVAC units. The report also noted St. Louis for the percentage of smoke-free households–84.9 percent.


 

“The designation as the most fire safe city in the Midwest means a great deal to the city of St. Louis,” says St. Louis Fire Department Battalion Chief Derrick Phillips, a member of NFPA’s Urban Fire and Life Safety Task Force. “The report shows that when a community comes together to tackle a serious issue, such as fire, the rewards are great. The citizens and firefighters are safer due to a decreased fire rate. For the St. Louis Fire Department, it proves that the work in fire prevention and community outreach have been successful in changing behaviors and curtailing potential fire related problems.”


 

Cities were also ranked on the percentage of households with smoke alarms . Chief Phillips added that the fire department’s smoke alarm installation program, which is featured in NFPA’s Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program, has been instrumental in getting fire safety messages to the public to elicit behavior change.


The report lists Chicago in second place and Indianapolis in third for the ranking.


!http://i.zemanta.com/290209476_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/290209476_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Report: St. Louis Most Fire Safe City in Midwest

!http://i.zemanta.com/118016908_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/118016908_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Cooking equipment remains top cause of home structure fires according to NFPA report

!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!

!http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/270605469_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Read the May issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter

!http://i.zemanta.com/289125577_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/289125577_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Test your smoke alarm knowledge with the 2014 Fire Prevention Week quiz!

Domino's logoDomino's Pizza today announced the five fire departments that were randomly selected to receive "FPW-in-a-Box 300" after signing up to particpate in the Fire Prevention Week/Domino's campaign this October. Here are the winners:

  • Assistant Chief Shane Gibbs - Oconee County Emergency Services/Walhalla, SC
  • Michael McAuliffe - Harvey Vol. Fire Co. No. 2/Harvey, LA
  • Chief Michael Vaughn - Washington Fire Dept./Washington, IL
  • LT Tom Mangiameli - Hoffman Estates Fire Department/Hoffman Estates, IL
  • Battalion Chief Rudy Khalaf - District 2 Fire/Rescue/San Antonio, TX

Congratulations to all of you! Once again, thanks to the nearly 60 fire departments across the country that have already signed on to participate in the program.

If you're a fire department that would like to implement the campaign in your community but haven't signed up yet, don't worry - there's still time! Simply fill out the downloadable form and send it to Jeannette Conklin at jeannette.conklin@dominos.com.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f291e2970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f291e2970c-320wi|alt=Lntbclassroom|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Lntbclassroom|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f291e2970c img-responsive!The Nashville Fire Department is working with the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools to ensure local students have the ability to stay safe in the event of fire. In a charge lead by Assistant Fire Chief, Manuel Fonseca, and school leaders, all students in pre-K through grade 2 will be taught lessons from the Learn Not to Burn (LNTB) program. This initiative involves 1,200 classroom teachers across the Nashville school district to implement the program. Online access to materials make it easy for teachers to use the Learn Not to Burn program. Additionally, LNTB updates to address the academic needs reflected in the Common Core Standards through engaging and developmentally-appropriate strategies help pave the way for the program roll out. 
 


!http://i.zemanta.com/145687349_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/145687349_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA adapts its Learn Not to Burn children's program for Grade 1 students

!http://i.zemanta.com/145690691_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/145690691_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA adapts its Learn Not to Burn children's program for Grade 1 students

!http://i.zemanta.com/135384341_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/135384341_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA has revised and updated its preschool program, Learn Not to Burn

!http://i.zemanta.com/133003491_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/133003491_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA has revised and updated its award-winning preschool program, Learn Not to Burn

!http://i.zemanta.com/272610869_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/272610869_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!New Learn Not to Burn curriculum for fire and life safety engages young children's varied learning styles

I was pouring through some materials in a folder here on my desk when I came across an NFPA brochure on cooking from 2006! At first I chuckled at the date, but as I looked at the cool little checklist at the back of the brochure, I thought, you know, no matter where we are in years, taking steps to stay safe from fire and other hazards is, and will continue to be, an important and timeless activity. 

As a parent, take a moment to share these small, but oh, so important tips with your kids, and see if you can answer all the questions with a resounding "Yes!" 

Cooking
Daily Checklist for Cooking Safety:

* Does a grown-up watch the stovetop when he or she is frying food?

* Do the grown-ups in your home pay attention to the food that is cooking?

* Is the fire department emergency number near the phone?

* Is your home's fire escape plan somewhere where everyone can see it? Have you practiced the plan?

* Are small appliances unplugged when they are not being used?

* Is the top of the stove clean? No spilled food, grease, paper or bags?

* Are things that can burn, like dish towels, curtains or paper at least 3 feet away from the stove?

* Are pot holders or oven mitts easy for grown-ups to reach when they are cooking?

* Do children and pets stay out of the "kid-free zone" (3 feet from stove) when a grown-up is cooking?

How did you do? If you didn't answer all the questions with a "yes," don't worry, you can find more information and additional safety tips on NFPA's cooking fire safety central web page that can help get you back on the path to safety. And don't forget, you can always download the tips sheet or infographic and hang it right on your fridge as a daily reminder for everyone to see! 

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f220c9970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f220c9970c-800wi|alt=Carsafety|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Carsafety|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01a511f220c9970c img-responsive!Summer travel season is in high gear. Millions of motorists are on the road. Keeping your vehicle properly maintained and serviced could not only reduce your chances of a breakdown, but also prevent a car fire. NFPA’s vehicle safety tips provide important reminders.


    • Have your car serviced regularly by a professionally trained mechanic. If you spot leaks, your car is not running properly; get it checked.

    • Never park a car where flammables, such as grass, are touching the catalytic converter.

    • Drive safely to avoid an accident.


 

The tips sheetalso includes the danger signs to look for in your car and what to do if your car is on fire. You can check out all of the safety tips sheets on the NFPA website.


 


!http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/273252315_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA provides new safety tip sheets en Espanol!
!http://i.zemanta.com/272443677_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/272443677_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!June and July are peak months for grilling accidents; be mindful of safety

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