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Scald Burns BlogThese days, food and lifestyle magazines and websites are filled with recipes for an all-time favorite comfort food–soup. There’s nothing like a hot, hearty bowl of chicken noodle, tomato basil, or any number of other kinds of soup to warm us up and fill us up on a crisp, fall day.

But as soup is prepared, precautions should be taken. NFPA’s Scald Prevention Safety Tips sheet tells us that prepackaged microwavable soups are a frequent cause of scald burn injuries–especially noodle soups–because they can easily tip over, pouring hot liquid and noodles on the person.

If you're preparing prepackaged soups, choose ones that come in containers that have a wide base, or to avoid the possibility of a spill, pour soup into a traditional bowl after heating.

If an accident does occur, treat the burn right away. Cool the burn with cool water for three to five minutes. Cover with a clean, dry cloth. Get medical help if needed. More scald prevention safety tips and NFPA’s other safety tips sheets are available on the website.

I happened upon the Penobscot Bay (Maine) Pilot yesterday that highlighted a blog about turkey fryer safety. According to the blog, Rankin's Hardware & Building Supplies in Camden has named October as Safety Month at the store and thus, has highlighted NFPA and the reasons why we discourage the use of this dangerous cooking "appliance."

To speak plainly, turkey fryers can lead to devastating burns and other injuries because of the amount, and the temperature, of the oil used. Not sure what I mean? Consider this:

* In deep frying, oil is heated to temperatures of 350° Fahrenheit or more. Cooking oil is combustible. If it is heated above its cooking temperature, its vapors can ignite.

* Propane-fired turkey fryers must be used outdoors. Many parts of the country may have rain or snow at this time of year, which if precipitation hits the hot cooking oil, the oil
may splatter or turn to steam, leading to burns.

* The fryers use a lot of oil, about five gallons. Considering the size and weight of the turkey, extreme caution must be taken when placing and removing the turkey from the fryer to be sure its is not dropped back into the fryer, splattering the oil on the chef.

Find more information on our turkey fryer safety tips sheet or safety tips web page.

Turkey 2With the Thanksgiving holiday fast approaching, people may overlook this important safety information in an enthusiastic effort to buy into this popular food craze using the holiday's signature bird. But if you take a look at our turkey fryer safety tips sheet, I'm hoping you will quickly see just how dangerous fryers really are. 

So, if you've been contemplating using a turkey fryer in the coming weeks or for Thanksgiving, please consider the alternatives for a safer, risk-free holiday, including looking at grocery stores, specialty food retailers and restaurants that sell deep fried turkeys.

NFPA gives Rankin's a shout out for informing the public about the dangers of turkey fryers and our concern for people's safety. Stay tuned to this blog for more cooking safety tips as the holidays approach.

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