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2015

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f9236a970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f9236a970c-320wi|alt=North Carolina Smoke Alarm Installation|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=North Carolina Smoke Alarm Installation|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f9236a970c img-responsive!In Brunswick County, North Carolina, five people have died in fires in the past month. According to WECT-TV, four of those people died in homes without working smoke alarms. In response, more than 150 people came together on a recent Saturday–firefighters and members of the community–to make sure residents have working smoke alarms.


By the end of the day, 836 smoke alarms were installed. Eleven alert devices that work in conjunction with smoke alarms were provided for people who are deaf or hard of hearing.


“We set a state record for installs on a single day,” says Brunswick County Fire Marshal Scott Garner.  “All of the volunteers were honoring those that we recently lost and we were pleased that we were joined by the family of one of the individuals that was tragically lost during a recent fire.  The message that their participation sent to the volunteers was more than any words could describe.”


Garner said during the next few weeks the department will conduct follow-up visits to residents who still need alarms.


 

NFPA has a comprehensive guide on smoke alarm installation programs. “Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program,” which includes everything needed to get started, from tips on how to select volunteers, to pointers on soliciting donations and publicizing your program.


!http://i.zemanta.com/329729786_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329729786_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Two recent home fire incidents underscore the life-saving power of working smoke alarms

!http://i.zemanta.com/329918949_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329918949_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA helps Domino's remind customers to change their smoke alarm batteries when changing their clocks this weekend

 

“It’s still the same old story…”, so the song goes. In the case of working smoke alarms, the story is most often the same: smoke alarms save lives.


 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f5ac48970c-400wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f5ac48970c-400wi|alt=Burlington ON fire pic|style=width: 360px; margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Burlington ON fire pic|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f5ac48970c img-responsive!


 

In the case of a recent Burlington, ON, home fire, that life-saving story played out when the smoke alarm started sounding at about 8:30pm. Upon investigating, the family found both cars in the garage fully engulfed by fire, while flames had spread to the second floor and roof above the garage.


Damage to the home was extensive, estimated at $600,000, but no one was hurt. Without the proper warning from working smoke alarms, this injury-free incident easily could have been a deadly one.


“The residents of the home were first alerted to the fire by activated smoke alarms which allowed them time to evacuate safely, proving once again that smoke alarms do save lives,” stated the Burlington Fire Department’s news release.


Here's the “same old story” on smoke alarm installation and maintenance:


    • Make sure there’s a smoke alarm on every level of the home, in each bedroom, and outside all sleeping areas.

    • Test smoke alarms monthly

    • Change the batteries when they begin to chirp, signaling that the battery is running low.

    • Replace smoke alarms every ten years.

For more smoke alarm information and advice, visit NFPA’s Smoke Alarm Central.</li> </ul>

Bundt PanIt’s a longstanding tradition. The women in my family spend the day before Easter in the kitchen preparing a feast to be enjoyed after church service the next day. My mother prepares the glazed ham and vegetables. My aunt and cousins make corn pudding, macaroni and cheese, deviled eggs and corn bread.

I pull out my favorite Bundt pan–the one shaped like a flower blossom–and bake a lemon buttermilk cake lightly dusted with sugar.

As my relatives and I make use of our ovens, stovetops, and microwave ovens next weekend, it’ll be important for us to use care. Anytime a meal is at the center of a family gathering is a great time to review NFPA’s cooking safety information. Cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries.

The cooking safety tips sheet includes a list of precautions.

  • Stay in the kitchen while frying, grilling, boiling or broiling and to turn off the stove if you leave the kitchen even for a short period of time.
  • If you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
  • Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop.

These are ingredients for a relaxing and safe family gathering.

I must admit, I find it hard to fathom grilling right now, let alone spring or summer here in the Northeast as another couple of inches of snow fell Friday night and bitter cold is slated for this week.

But Sunday morning I was watching a news program and was reminded that while the Northeast is still bundled up in parkas and hats, the rest of the country has been dealing with quite the opposite challenge, a lack of precipitation and unseasonably warm temperatures. So while those of here in New England are still digging out our grills from the snow, many more families outside this area have already fired theirs up, cooking their favorite summer fare.6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0f2edf8970c-500wi.jpg

So today, I’d like to add a twist to the grilling fire safety story and instead of talking solely about grilling issues related to structural fires, I want to relate this very serious issue to the WUI and the challenge of grilling in high risk wildfire areas.

A recent online article on NC1 News out of Rapid City, South Dakota speaks to this very issue. With little precipitation in recent months, the Rapid City Fire Department has warned the public to take caution when using grills, especially when lighting charcoal, due to high winds that accompany the dry weather. I know it’s not always top of mind but remember, embers from flames shooting up from the grill can easily be whisked away by these winds and land in trees or on the grass sparking a fire.

According to the article, the U.S drought monitor shows 82 percent of South Dakota as abnormally dry or in moderate conditions already, and predictions point to these conditions persisting or intensifying through June.

Home fires involving grilling incidents occur most often in the months of June and July, and with the added concerns about drought, increasing temperatures and high winds, grilling not only poses a threat to houses, it can also start a grass or brush fire in our yards and quickly spread throughout the neighborhood. As you work on ways to safeguard your grill, try and take an extra step and include safety measures around your home. By following a few simple Firewise and grilling safety tips, you can reduce the risk of a fire happening in and around your home.

NFPA has some great resources for grilling enthusiasts you can use right now including an infographic and tips sheet. Download both and tack them to the fridge for easy access. Also, you’ll want to visit our grilling page often over the next few months because we’ll be adding new resources you can use and share with friends and family.

In the meantime, let us know how we can help. What are you doing to keep yourself and your family safer from fire? Have stories you want to share about how families can stay safer while grilling? Have you created a safer home ignition zone around your house using Firewise principles in action? We want to hear from you!

Find out more about grilling fire safety at www.nfpa.org/grilling. And learn more about the home ignition zone and the Firewise Communities Program at www.firewise.org.

And here’s to hoping that spring and summer will soon reach the Northeast!

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This past Saturday, a tragic fire swept through a Brooklyn, NY, home, killing seven siblings ages five to 16. Their mother and 15-year-old sister escaped by jumping from a second-floor window; both are in critical condition after suffering burns and smoke inhalation. The fire started when a hotplate in the kitchen malfunctioned.

According to FDNY firefighters, the home did not have working smoke alarms on the first floor where the fire started just after midnight, nor the second floor where the family was sleeping. By the time the mother awoke, she was unable to get to her children.

“The mother would have had to go into the fire to get to the back bedrooms, so I think she tried, although badly burned, to get out and get help for her children”, said FDNY Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro. “She was very brave.”

The details of this incident are simply heart-wrenching. Like many other deadly home fires that occur in the U.S. each year, a common thread remains: the smoke alarms are missing or not working.

For all of us who work in the world of fire safety, the importance of smoke alarms is well understood. This incident underscores the fact that we still have a lot more to do in educating the public about their life-saving value.

The FDNY clearly recognized this as well, distributing pamphlets about smoke alarms, along with cooking safety tips, on Saturday afternoon in the Brooklyn neighborhood where the fire occurred.

Safety SourceThe March issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education enewsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find;  

  • New music video teaches - firefighters as community helpers
  • Safe battery storage for spring cleaning
  • Short fire-safety story for kids
  • Video: Add a dash of cooking safety with your favorite meal 
  • Remembering When evaluation project underway
  • Looking Back: Remembering the St. Anthony's Hospital fire

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division, activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog® and more.

Today, we celebrate Sparky the Fire Dog's birthday! Of course, Sparky likes to remind us (as shown in the video) that it is a good time to brush up on our fire safety tips, and he is correct! 

Sparky cake bossOn a lighter note, birthdays are a great time for fun and celebration! Remember Sparky's 60th birthday four years ago when we had Carlo's Bakery (home of TLC's The Cake Boss) make an amazing cake just for his special day?! 

Our Sparky the Fire Dog party kit provides everything you need to create a special day for your own little firefighter! We have even provided photos to give you ideas on how to bring your party to life. These free DIY party plans are downloadable pdfs and include pages of tutorials and party instructions. You will find everything from the party to-do list, invitations, thank you cards, birthday banner, cupcake toppers, name tags, water bottle wrappers, games and more. 

See more fun ways we have celebrated Sparky's birthday in the past, and be sure to wish Sparky a happy birthday today on his Facebook page!

Sparky party kit

Sparky Spies Spring
When the first day of spring arrives on March 20, many of us will turn our attention to that annual rite of passage–spring cleaning. As we decide which home cleaning projects to tackle in what order, let’s add fire safety to the checklist. Take a few minutes to read through NFPA’s tips on taking care of your smoke alarms, tips sheet on 9-volt battery safety and the clothes dryer safety tips sheet. Have Sparky the Fire Dog® get the kids involved with the "Cool to do"  Spring Safety Hunt activity.

 


 

PBS kids star SteveSongs has teamed up with NFPA again for a new music video about firefighters. &quot;Firefighters Are on Their Way,&quot; on Sparky's School House, teaches kids about the important job firefighters do and the role they play as community helpers. Geared for preschool to grade 1 students, the video works well with the Learn Not to Burn® program's lesson about firefighters as community helpers.


!http://i.zemanta.com/329918949_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329918949_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA helps Domino's remind customers to change their smoke alarm batteries when changing their clocks this weekend

 

Annmarie Pickett, public education officer for the Worcester Fire Department in Worcester, Massachusetts, has been chosen the 2015 Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Year .


 

Lt. Pickett is known for her steadfast commitment to bringing fire and life safety messages to as many !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0ea253f970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0ea253f970c-320wi|alt=Annmarie Headshot jpeg|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Annmarie Headshot jpeg|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0ea253f970c img-responsive! people as possible. Under her leadership the public education division in 2014 conducted more than 700 workshops reaching 40,000 residents compared to 10 workshops reaching 161 residents in 2008, just before she joined the division.


 

Because of her dedication to education and awareness, she has fostered a partnership between two groups at high-risk of fire: older adults and young children. Lt. Pickett formed an intergenerational partnership between the city’s senior center and a nearby elementary school. One of the many highlights from this collaboration occurred at the senior center when older adults worked with third grade students to create home escape plans using NFPA materials.


 

Either she or an instructor she designates visits each of the 37 Worcester Head Start classrooms three times a year, presenting lessons on the Learn Not to Burn (LNTB) program to more than 600 children.


 

Along with the award,&#0160;Lt. Pickett&#0160;also earned a $1,000 honorarium and free travel to Chicago for an award presentation at the general session of the NFPA Conference . The Worcester Fire Department will also receive a $1,000 donation to support public education activities.


!http://i.zemanta.com/330909379_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/330909379_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA awards 2015 Jensen Grant to Wisconsin fire department

Working smoke alarms ultimately saved the lives a Charlottesville, NC, woman and her two daughters, but a delayed response to the alarms contributed to a dramatic escape. Here’s a brief overview of what happened: Kitchen towel

A kitchen towel was accidentally ignited by a candle in the kitchen, triggering the smoke alarm to sound. After believing the towel was extinguished, the mother went upstairs with her two daughters, one of whom was an infant. When the smoke alarm began to sound again, she assumed that the residual smoke had set it off. By the time she investigated further, the fire had spread to piles of laundry in the kitchen and smoke conditions had banked down to the floor.

StairsIn an effort to escape their home, the mother returned upstairs, took her two daughters into a front bedroom, and closed the door behind them. Using a window over the front porch to escape, the infant daughter was lowered to neighbors with a bed sheet. When the fire department arrived, the older girl was in the process of being lowered to neighbors. The mother was brought down by the department’s ground ladder.

We so often focus on the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home, which, of course, is vital to fire safety. But when a smoke alarm sounds, it needs to be taken seriously and responded to with a sense of urgency. That’s another message we need to keep communicating publicly. Fortunately in this case, when the mom realized there was a fire in her home, she took appropriate steps to protect herself and her daughters.

North Shore PatchThe North Shore Fire Department of Wisconsin is the recipient of the 2015 Rolf H. Jensen Memorial Public Education Grant. The grant will support the continuation of the department’s “Prevent, Prepare, and React” home assessment and smoke alarm installation campaign.

A risk analysis of the seven communities the department serves showed that the percentage of adults 65 and over was above the national average. In 2014, NFPA awarded the fire department and local health department training through the Remembering When™ conference to administer fire and fall prevention education to older adults. Since then the team has presented Remembering When to more than 300 residents and conducted 28 home assessments. Data compiled during the assessments showed that none of the homes had properly fitted smoke alarms.

North Shore received a grant from Wal-Mart to purchase 100 ten-year smoke alarms. Most have been installed. The Rolf Jensen Grant will assist the department in conducting an additional 125 home assessments and purchasing close to 300 smoke alarms.

The campaign will be evaluated using record management software to determine if there is a reduction in fire and medical calls for the targeted age group. The evaluation will also include follow-up surveys on residents’ knowledge of the eight fire and eight fall prevention messages of Remembering When.

Named in honor of Rolf H. Jensen, founder of RJA Group, Inc., now Jensen Hughes, one of the largest fire protection and life safety engineering and consulting firms in the world, the $5,000 grant is awarded annually to any fire department – paid or volunteer – to support a community-wide fire and life safety education program or campaign. Recipients are chosen based on demonstration of a plan to implement the program or campaign aimed at the general public or a targeted group, clearly stated goals and objectives, staff assigned for the project, and a final report.

Oxygen Cigarette Fire Photo 2

Two people were killed and two others injured after a home in Altadena, California, caught fire on the weekend.

According to Eyewitness News ABC7, Los Angeles County firefighters arrived to find the home engulfed in flames. A 58-year-old man and his mother, 86, were killed. Neighbors said they heard an explosion at the home. Authorities believe the woman, who used an oxygen tank, was smoking a cigarette.Oxygen Cigarette Fire

Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn hotter and faster than usual. There is no safe way to smoke in a home when oxygen is in use.

NFPA’s medical oxygen informationand safety tips sheet provide more on the safe use of medical oxygen.

Neighbors said the man and his mother lived in the home for more than 30 years. Two other people who lived there were injured in the fire and taken to a nearby hospital.

A recent article from London Community News paints a striking picture. Despite the London Fire Department's increased efforts to provide education and programs aimed at preventing cooking-related fires, since late January the city has seen a jump in the number of kitchen fires and is concerned for the welfare of its residents.  6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb07fef7d5970d-320wi.jpg

 

 

According to the  Department, seven kitchen fires have occurred in the month of February alone. There was also one in January and one earlier this month. Out of the nine fires, three involved cooking oil. One such fire saw a resident actually attempt to remove the pot of boiling oil outside. He received minor burns.

As Deputy Chief Gary Bridge told London residents, "Kitchen fires are traditionally the most common and also easily prevented. We encourage people to not get distracted when cooking and be present at all times."

Sound words indeed.

And, okay, while I realize that a few of my cooking fire safety blog posts focus on the cooking fire problem in other countries, my main point is, cooking fires touch everyone regardless of where you live: a large cosmopolitan city like London or a small peaceful community in the American suburbs. We should never assume that a kitchen fire can't happen to us. The truth is, cooking fires is a global problem and one that NFPA continues to work really hard on alongside its partners and other fire safety organizations around the world.

So with that in mind, NFPA reminds residents to please take caution when cooking. Just a few simple tips can go a long way to keeping yourself and your family safe. You can start by:

  • Keeping an eye on what you fry
  • Being alert when cooking
  • Keeping things that can catch fire away from cooking area

Find out how to stay safer from kitchen fires by visiting NFPA's Cooking Fire Safety Central webpage where you'll find videos, checklists, safety tips and so much more. This year, make it a point to eliminate the fire hazards associated with cooking. We're here to help. To find out more, visit us at www.nfpa.org/cooking.

SMOKE ALARM CHILD WITH FAMILY (2)
Schoolchildren across the nation are not only reading their favorite books all this month during National Reading Month, they’re dressing up based on the characters and themes from the stories.

A little boy in San Antonio, Texas, offers inspiration for children reading stories with a fire safety theme, like The Case of the Missing Smoke Alarms, or Sparky’s Birthday Surprise on the Sparky School House website.

When three-year-old Noah Keck’s parents asked him last year what he wanted to dress up as for SMOKE ALARM CHILD POSES (2)Halloween he said he wanted to be a smoke alarm.  His father, Chad Keck, was not surprised. “Noah has leukemia and spent a lot of time in the hospital when he was originally diagnosed and was also stuck at home and started noticing things that others might not pay attention to.”

He says Noah was initially afraid of the smoke alarms, but he and his wife, Zahra, assured Noah that the alarms were there to protect him.

Chad says these days, nearly everywhere they go, Noah–who is now four years old–points out the smoke alarms and asks if they have fresh batteries. Whenever they pass the neighborhood fire station, Noah loves to check on the trucks. They are either “sleeping” or out “helping” someone because of a fire.

Noah’s costume was made by his grandmother. “He did go trick-or-treating on our street and the reactions were overwhelming,” said Chad. “Nearly everyone wanted to take a picture of Noah and his costume. Many said it was the best costume they’d ever seen.”

Chad says Noah is doing well. He’s been on daily treatment for his illness since his first birthday, spending months in the hospital and since then has had almost daily clinic visits.

If all goes well, his treatment will be tapered off later this year. His parents say he has been an inspiration to many other children at the clinic.

He is also a little fire safety ambassador who found a creative way to spread the message about the importance of having working smoke alarms, whether for Halloween, National Reading Month, Fire Prevention Week, or any other time of the year.

Clock
NFPA and Domino's have teamed up once again to help people protect themselves and their loved ones from home fires. Using daylight savings time and pizza boxes, we’re working together to encourage the public to change their batteries when they change their clocks this weekend. (Daylight savings time is Sunday, March 8, at 2 a.m.) Domino's logo

Domino’s is using its pizza boxes to deliver fire safety tips throughout the month of March in participating markets across the country.

“Daylight saving time brings a convenient, timely reminder to change the batteries in your smoke alarm, which is an easy, important step to make your home safer,” said Jenny Fouracre, Domino’s Pizza spokesperson. “Domino’s has a great opportunity to reach many people in their homes and we want to use it to share fire safety tips with them. We are excited to work with the NFPA to help make homes across the country a little bit safer.”

As part of the spring campaign, customers who order from participating Domino’s stores may be surprised when their delivery arrives aboard a fire engine. If all the smoke alarms in the home are working, the pizza is free. If a smoke alarm is not working, the firefighters will replace the batteries or leave a fully functioning smoke alarm in the home.

For more information on smoke alarm installation, testing and maintenance, visit our Smoke Alarm Central page.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0e2ad46970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0e2ad46970c-320wi|alt=Matches Fire Photo|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Matches Fire Photo|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0e2ad46970c img-responsive!Children playing with cigarette lighters has been determined to be the cause of a recent fire in Springfield, Massachusetts, that destroyed a three-family home and displaced 15 people.


 

No injuries were reported, according to WWLP-TV, but the house was considered a complete loss, according to fire officials.


Heat from the fire also melted the vinyl siding of the home next door, causing several thousands of dollars’ worth of damage.


The fire quickly spread throughout the building from the second floor into the third floor, attic, and roof. Several times the fire appeared to be out only to erupt once again. It took firefighters about 3 1/2 hours to bring the fire under control.


Investigators with the Springfield Arson and Bomb Squad determined the fire was started accidentally by children playing with cigarette lighters.


 

NFPA’s Educational Messages Desk Reference advises that cigarettes, lighters, matches, and other smoking materials be kept up high out of the reach of children in a locked cabinet. The smoking safety page on the website and the Smoking and Home Fire Safety tips sheet also provide information on precautions involving smoking and smoking materials.


!http://i.zemanta.com/328701218_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/328701218_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Kindergarten student helps his family safely escape home fire after learning NFPA's Learn Not to Burn program

A family of eight was able to safely escape an overnight fire in their Phoenix, AZ, home this past weekend, thanks to working smoke alarms. According to local reports, the fire was started by unattended cooking on the stove, which caused significant damage to the home’s kitchen and attic.

“We’re just glad that everybody is o.k.,” said Alaina McLittle, who lived in the home. “You can always replace a house, but you can’t replace lives.”

Sadly, this sentiment was underscored by a home fire that occurred in Greensville, SC, last Friday, which claimed the life of 75-year-old Mark Walker. Firefighters were unable to detect any evidence of a smoke alarm in the home, where Walker lived alone. An autopsy revealed that he died from smoke inhalation and heat related injuries.

As reinforced by these two incidents, working smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a home fire. That’s why it’s so important to follow these basic smoke alarm guidelines:

  • Install one smoke alarm on every level of the home, in every bedroom and outside all sleeping areas. Smoke alarm image for typepad
  • Test smoke alarms monthly.
  • For smoke alarms that include a 10-year, non-replaceable battery, replace the entire smoke alarm if it begins to “chirp”, indicating that the battery is running low. For smoke alarms that use regular batteries, either replace them annually, or before then if they begin to chirp.
  • Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years or sooner if they don’t respond properly when tested.
  • When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside.

For more information on smoke alarm installation, testing and maintenance, visit Smoke Alarm Central, NFPA's complete source for smoke alarm information.

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7576f31970b-550wi.jpg
Attention secret safety agents: Crack Sparky’s secret message in this month's Crack the Code activity. Use your decoder ring or the key on the Crack the Code sheet. You can also make your own decoder!

This month you will be finding out the answer to why frogs like St. Patrick's Day. Sparky hopes you kids have tons of fun with this activity!

Keep an eye out for a new Crack the Code each month in the 'Cool to Do' area of Sparky's website.


6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d0df2c26970c-800wi.jpgSparky the Fire Dog® makes marking your place while reading easy with his Bookmark Bonanza. The printable page on the Sparky website includes two bookmarks, one completed and the other that kids (or grownups) can color.

Not only does the bookmark keep kids on the right page but also reminds them about an important fire safety message.

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