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2015

Sparklers play a huge role in Fourth of July preparations but as you know, NFPA wants you to leave the fireworks to the professionals. Each year on Independence Day, thousands of people, most often children and teens, are injured while using consumer fireworks.

Few people really understand the associated risks including devastating burns, fires, and even death.

The Alliance to Stop Consumer Fireworks is a group of health and safety organizations, coordinated by NFPA, that urges the public to avoid the use of consumer fireworks and instead, to enjoy displays of fireworks conducted by trained professionals.

This Fourth of July, opt out of using consumer fireworks and check out these three simple DIY projects from our friends at MarthaStewart.com. These paper sparkler ideas offer a great alternative to the real thing and are a great family project that everyone will have fun doing together.

This weekend, enjoy the holiday in style and with fire safety in mind. Happy Fourth, everyone!

Each year when we promote fireworks safety, we get a lot of flak from people who think our stance is downright absurd. In response to yesterday’s Facebook post, which stated that there’s no safe way to use consumer fireworks, one person commented, “That is the dumbest statement I’ve read today, I’ve never met one person injured by fireworks.”

Ban on fireworks image

Anyone who tracks fireworks injuries knows that thousands of people are, in fact, injured from fireworks each year. Many of those injuries are serious or even fatal. Just this past weekend in Michigan, a 47-year-old man died when a large mortar fireworks shell he was holding next to his head exploded.

According to Walled Lake, MI, Police Chief Paul Shakinas, when first responders arrived, they found the man unresponsive, not breathing, and suffering from severe trauma to the back of his head.

“Hands down, the worst I’ve ever seen,” Shakinas said. “I’ve seen (fireworks) accidents, but never causing a fatality. He was pronounced dead at the scene.”

Firefighters and first responders can attest to the damage fireworks cause each year. An article in today's Boston Globe today reinforced that message. According to Rick DeLorie, Wellesley, MA, fire chief and president of the Fire Chiefs Association of Massachusetts, firefighters respond “to all types of fires and medical emergencies” over the holiday because of fireworks. “In fact, July 4 is the busiest day for fires after Thanksgiving and Christmas.”

Massachusetts officials also noted that over the past year, rescuers have responded to several fireworks incidents resulting in car and home damage, serious burns, and, in one case, the amputation of a person’s hand.

Smoke alarms can make the difference between life and death in a fire, but they have to be working. That’s a message the New York State legislature clearly understands. Last week, the New York State Senate and Assembly passed legislation requiring all battery-operated smoke alarms sold in New York State be equipped with non-removable, 10-year batteries. Smoke_alarm

The bill, which is now pending Governor Cuomo's signature, prompted applause from Firemen’s Association of the State of New York (FASNY) President Robert McConville. “As firefighters, we frequently encounter the horrific effects of fires in homes without working smoke alarms,” McConville said. “This bill makes New York State a safer place and will undoubtedly go a long way toward preventing future home fire deaths. We look forward to working with the Governor in the coming weeks to see this bill become law.”

NFPA requires a smoke alarm in each bedroom, near all sleeping areas and on every level of the home, including the basement, and smoke alarms should be tested monthly. For more information on smoke alarm safety, visit www.nfpa.org/smokealarms.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7a665d0970b-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7a665d0970b-800wi|alt=FPW15 Poster Use this one|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=FPW15 Poster Use this one|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7a665d0970b img-responsive!The staff of the Aurora Regional Fire Museum in Illinois purchased NFPA educational materials last year for the “Youth Firefighter Challenge,” the museum’s fire safety summer camp, and staff members were thrilled when they placed another order for this year’s camp because of a new feature among the Fire Prevention Week catalog items–the FPW poster is !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb084a7589970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb084a7589970d-800wi|alt=FPW15back Spanish|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=FPW15back Spanish|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb084a7589970d img-responsive!two-sided. One side is in English and the other is in Spanish.


“We have discovered that many of the campers’ parents and grandparents aren’t able to read English,” says Aurora Regional Fire Museum Development Director Mark Baum. “This new poster provides us with valuable information.”


Campers are taught fire safety, physical fitness, and life skills. More than 1,600 children participate. Camp counselors, who are studying fire science during the school year, are employed as firefighter explorers.


Baum says that by purchasing the poster, the FPW theme, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm,” reaches a much broader audience in Aurora.


!http://i.zemanta.com/345501370_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345501370_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA announces "Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm" as the official theme for Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, 2015

!http://i.zemanta.com/noimg_114_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/noimg_114_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Fire Prevention Week message presented in American Sign Language

!http://i.zemanta.com/345281519_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345281519_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA announces theme for Fire Prevention Week 2015

 


 

When the citizens of Worcester, Massachusetts, found out that Lt. Annmarie Pickett had been chosen the 2015 Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Year and would receive the award at NFPA Conference they wanted to give her a sendoff she would never forget.


 

Not only was she given the key to the city at a recent city council meeting, she was also honored with a video tribute . The six-minute video highlights her work and includes on-camera testimonials from the mayor, city manager, the fire chief, staff and participants of the Worcester Senior Center, and her mom.


 

Lt. Pickett talked to me later about how much she loves her job and how touched she was by the video. She says she is grateful for all of the training and support she has gotten throughout her career from NFPA and other groups and organizations. She has used both Learn Not to Burn® and the Remembering When™ program in her work.


 

Lt. Pickett is known for her steadfast commitment to bringing fire and life safety messages to as !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d12e8243970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d12e8243970c-320wi|alt=Annmarie gets award|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=Annmarie gets award|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d12e8243970c img-responsive! many people as possible. Under her leadership, the Worcester Fire Department public education division in 2014 conducted more than 700 workshops reaching 40,000 residents compared to 10 workshops reaching 161 residents in 2008, just before she joined the division.


She has fostered a partnership between two groups at high-risk of fire: older adults and young children, forming an intergenerational partnership between the senior center and a nearby elementary school.


She received the educator of the year award from NFPA Board of Directors Chairman Ernest Grant in a ceremony during the conference general session.


!http://i.zemanta.com/348150103_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/348150103_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Educator of the Year receives key to the city

There’s no safe way to use consumer fireworks. If that sounds a bit Debbie Downer, we get it. Fireworks are festive and even mesmerizing at times. But take a look at these statistics, and our firm stance on fireworks safety starts to make a lot of sense:

Debbie Downer

  • On Independence Day in a typical year, fireworks account for two out of five of all reported U.S. fires, more than any other cause of fire.
  • Over 11,000 injuries resulted from consumer use of fireworks in 2013.
  • More than half of fireworks injuries in 2013 were to extremities, including the hand or finger, leg and arm. Most of the remaining injuries were to parts of the head, including the eye.
  • The Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) 2012 Fireworks Annual Report shows that two out of five people injured by fireworks were under the age of 15. The risk of fireworks injury was highest for the children under five, followed by children 10 to 14 years of age. Males accounted for 57 percent of the injuries overall.

So how can you celebrate the holiday safely? Attend professional fireworks displays put on by trained professionals. Let’s face it, they’re far more spectacular than anything you’d see in someone’s back yard. Even Debbie Downer would be hard-pressed to complain.

Check out our fireworks safety page for videos like the one below and infographics to learn just how dangerous consumer fireworks can be. More fireworks statistics can be found in our 2013 Fireworks Report.


Due to the extreme conditions in some areas such as low humidity in the vegetation, extended periods of drought, high temperatures and high winds, extreme caution should be paramount in everyday activities out of doors.  Driving a car is one of the activities we all enjoy during the summer season, especially as we travel for summer vacation time.  Make sure that your road trip is not the cause of a wildfire.  The Arizona Department of Transportation shared some tips: Fire Car

  • Avoid driving or parking your vehicle in tall grass. (Or any tall dry vegetation)
  • Never throw a burning cigarette out of a vehicle.
  • When pulling a trailer, attach safety chains securely; loose chains can drag on the pavement and cause sparks, igniting roadside fires.
  • Look behind you before driving away from fire-sensitive locations, such as areas with tall grass or campsites, to check for signs of a developing fire.
  • Observe “Red Flag” fire-weather warnings. These warnings are issued when weather conditions are conducive to the easy start and rapid spread of wildfires.
  • Always use a spark arrestor on internal-combustion engines.

You can also:

  • Follow all public-use restrictions and access closures – It is important to check with local agencies about any closures before venturing off road.
  • Be prepared – Carry a shovel and a fire extinguisher in your vehicle and OHV.
  • Call 911 immediately if you see a roadside fire and give an accurate description of the size and location of the fire including mile marker information, the side of the road (are you traveling east, west etc.), the last exit you passed or nearest landmark.
    Img_0297
    Image of car fire in Boise from the Bureau of Land Management

Car Fires themselves can be a cause of wildfires.  A June 14th 2015 article in the Boise Weekly, Car Fire Sparks Wildfire Near Jump Creek, shared that; "Firefighters say a car fire—the third in one week—sparked a wildfire that has scorched more than 330 acres, eight miles south of Marsing."  Another article dated June 19th 2015 on the KCRA.com website, Roadside Truck Fire Sparks Wildfire Near Oakhurst, talked about a pickup truck that caused a fire near Oakhurst, California that burnt hundreds of acres. 

Many times simple maintenance items overlooked can cause your car to catch fire.  The NFPA has some interesting statistics on car fires:

U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 152,300 automobile fires per year in 2006-2010. These fires caused an average of 209 civilian deaths, 764 civilian injuries, and $536 million in direct property damage.

Facts and Figures
  • Automobile fires were involved in 10% of reported U.S. fires, 6% of U.S. fire deaths.
  • On average, 17 automobile fires were reported per hour. These fires killed an average of four people every week.
  • Mechanical or electrical failures or malfunctions were factors in roughly two-thirds of the automobile fires.
  • Collisions and overturns were factors in only 4% of highway vehicle fires, but these incidents accounted for three of every five (60%) automobile fire deaths.
  • Only 2% of automobile fires began in fuel tanks or fuel lines, but these incidents caused 15% of the automobile fire death.

You can take simple steps to prevent a car fire: Carsafety


• Have your car serviced regularly by a professionally
trained mechanic. If you spot leaks, your car is not
running properly, get it checked. A well-maintained
car is less likely to have a fire.
• If you must transport gasoline, transport only a small
amount in a certified gas can that is sealed. Keep a
window open for ventilation.
• Gas cans and propane cylinders should never be
transported in the passenger compartment.
• Never park a car where flammables, such as grass,
are touching the catalytic converter.
• Drive safely to avoid an accident.

For more information about car fire safety download the NFPA's car fire safety pdf.  Enjoy your road trip wherever your travel plans take you and have a safe and memorable time.

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While in Chicago, for NFPA Conference & Expo, Sparky stopped by Millennium Park to chat with some of his fans. One of Sparky's favorite things is being able to talk with people about fire safety, so we brought him out on the street and chatted with a bunch of fans to see just how much they knew about smoke alarms. 

We asked questions like, "Name 3 rooms in your home that need a smoke alarm," and "How long do you have to escape your home after a smoke alarm sounds?" and even "How often should you replace your smoke alarm?" Would you know the answers to these questions if Sparky asked you on the street?! We will be working on some fun videos showcasing everyone's answers in time for Fire Prevention Week, so stay tuned!

When Lt. Annmarie Pickett, public education officer for the Worcester Fire Department in Massachusetts, was told by her supervisor that she needed to be at this week’s city council meeting, she figured city officials wanted to be briefed on the partnerships she’s been forming and outreach Keys to the city 3efforts made following a recent fire fatality.

However, when she got to council chambers she realized that officials had something else in mind. Lt. Pickett, NFPA’s 2015 Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Year was presented with the key to the city in recognition of her commitment to fire safety and her many achievements.

“I couldn’t believe it,” she says. “Somehow they snuck my parents and kids into council chambers.”  She says she is grateful for all of the training and support she has gotten throughout her career from NFPA and other groups and organizations. She has used both Learn Not to Burn® and the Remembering When™ program in her work.

“For my partnerships and relationship building, you are seeing the results of what everyone taught me. Everyone brought me to this point. I’m very thankful.”

IMG_5021hoarding
Recently, I had the opportunity to participate in the kickoff to the North Carolina (NC) hoarding task force.  At the 39th annual NC Education Conference, it was announced that the task force was up and running.  This task force was a result of a workshop over three years ago offered by NFPA about Hoarding for the Fire Service.  Besides conducting workshops, the staff at NFPA has been working on programs to offer at state meetings and tips for consumers.  The safety tip sheet that can be used to educate firefighters on the dangers of hoarding is available as well as an NFPA Journal articles online.  I am excited about the resources and help that this statewide task force will give to local fire marshals and fire departments in NC.  Congratulations NC!

JeffDonahueNFPA has a new employee in the Public Education Division serving as regional education specialist for the Western United States. Jeff Donahue has more than 30 years’ experience in the fire service and most recently was division chief/fire marshal for the City of Reno Fire Department, where he managed all services and activities of the Fire Prevention Division. In addition, he worked on improving processes and procedures for the Fire Prevention Division that had been subject to reductions in the workforce. He also helped develop in-house staff management and leadership skills.

Jeff has worked closely with NFPA as a board member of the International Fire Marshals Association, most recently as first vice president and chapter committee chair.

He is the third regional specialist NFPA has hired in recent months. Meredith Hawes covers the central region and Mid-Atlantic States and Kelly Ransdell covers the Southern United States and New England Region.

The Public Education Regional Specialists work remotely and are responsible for promoting the use of NFPA fire safety education materials at the state and local levels. They serve in an ambassadorial role for the association on a regional level by being spokespersons for all NFPA public education and advocacy initiatives, and provide an NFPA presence for fire departments in the region while coordinating field activities with Association staff.

A story out of Arizona this week can easily make you stop and think, "Wow, this could happen to me, too."  

Fire officials responded to a house fire that started from hot cooking oil. According to the story on Tusconlocalmedia.com, the occupant of the house was heating up oil to make french fries. When he dropped the frozen fries into the hot oil, a flash fire occurred that spread to the cabinets and plastic hood area of the stove.  Cooking oil

After he was unable to put out the fire, the man called 9-1-1 and had to quickly evacuate the home. Thankfully, fire crews on the scene put out the fire quickly and no one was injured, but the residents will now be displaced for some time as the house gets repaired.

Making french fries seems like a relatively easy thing to do and many of us have made them at one time or another. But fire officials have warned that frozen fries have a high water/moisture content, which does not mix well with hot oil. Some tips to keep in mind when frying with oil:

  • Keep an eye on what you fry. If you see wisps of smoke or the oil smells, immediately turn off the burner and/or carefully remove the pan from the burner. Smoke is a danger sign that the oil is too hot.
  • Heat the oil slowly to the temperature you need for frying or sautéing.
  • Add food gently to the pot or pan so the oil does not splatter.
  • Always cook with a lid beside your pan. If you have a fire, slide the lid over the pan and turn off the burner. Do not remove the cover because the fire could start again. Let the pan cool for a long time. Never throw water or use a fire extinguisher on the fire.

Before you create your next great meal, take a few minutes and review some important tips related to cooking and cooking with oil on NFPA's cooking fire safety webpage, and share them with the ones you love!

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d128e511970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d128e511970c-800wi|alt=Truck Pulls up to house|title=Truck Pulls up to house|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d128e511970c image-full img-responsive!


 

Sparky’s® Coloring Book is a big hit with the children of Nevada, Iowa. That’s because a coloring activity conducted during Fire Prevention Week offers them the possibility of a visit to their favorite restaurant and a ride to school in a fire truck.


 

Last year, the Nevada Fire Department, in partnership with the Nevada Community School District, !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb084396cb970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb084396cb970d-320wi|alt=In booth at McDonald's|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=In booth at McDonald's|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb084396cb970d img-responsive!sponsored a coloring contest using a page from Sparky’s Coloring Book. Close to 400 kids in grades 1 through 5 at Central Elementary School participated. Seven winners were chosen. A fire truck pulled up to their homes and they were taken to McDonald’s restaurant on their way to school for a free cookie and juice.


“Many times the kids do not tell their parents about the contest,” says Nevada Fire Department Director of Fire and EMS Ray Reynolds. “I am not sure who screams the loudest, the kids or the mothers. We do it all in the same day and it caps off our FPW activities with a good feeling for everyone.”


 

He says that during Fire Prevention Week firefighters speak to individual classrooms for 40 minutes about “get low and go” under smoke, smoke alarm awareness, drawing an escape plan, seeing firefighters as community helpers, and other safety !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb0843992b970d-120wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb0843992b970d-120wi|alt=Sparky's Coloring Books|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Sparky's Coloring Books|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb0843992b970d img-responsive!lessons. He says the coloring activity and the potential of riding in style aboard a fire truck help to reinforce the safety messaging.


“I have had so many experiences where kids have survived a fire using techniques the fire department taught them,” says Reynolds. “If you are selected to ride to school in a fire engine, you are more likely to remember what the fire department taught. Months later, I still get kids that say, ‘I remember you in the school teaching.’ ”


!http://i.zemanta.com/346909954_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/346909954_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Partner with NFPA and Domino's for Fire Prevention Week!

!http://i.zemanta.com/346660265_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/346660265_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Take the 2015 Fire Prevention Week quiz to test your knowledge on smoke alarms

!http://i.zemanta.com/345863912_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345863912_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!FPW already in the planning stages for fire department in North Carolina

Some sad news out of North Carolina. The principal at a high school in Fayetteville suffered third-degree burns recently when the propane grill he was preparing malfunctioned and caught fire hours before the school's senior picnic.

According to WRAL.com out of Raleigh/Durham, the principal, who plans the cookout each year before graduation, was trying to light one of the propane grills at a nearby park where the party was being held and was having a problem getting it started. As he tried to light the grill, the fumes that had built up inside ignited when he opened the lid. Fortunately no one else was injured at the scene. Our thoughts are with this principal; we hope he makes a full recovery soon. 

This story reminds us that during the spring and summer, cookouts and BBQs will continue to play a large role in graduation, birthday and pool parties. So before your special event, take a look at our latest grilling fire safety video. It's short, and it addresses some of the key misconceptions of grilling including how to safely turn your grill on and off, and what to do when it doesn't ignite properly. Think you know? Watch below. You might be surprised by what you learn: 

 

If you own a gas grill, you might also be interested in our short video below that specifically addresses the proper way to test your grill for gas leaks before use. Watch it as a refresher before your next event.

 

After you've watched the videos and throughout the season, as you prepare to light up your grill, consider the following:

  • Use propane and charcoal grills outdoors only
  • Place the grill well away from your home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches
  • Put safety rules for kids in place. Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the grill area
  • Clean your grill often, removing any grease or fat buildup from the grates and in the trays below
  • Stay next to your grill at all times while cooking; never leave the area unattended

For more grilling and food safety ideas, check out our cooking fire safety page and enjoy your next great meal safely with friends and family!

Safety Source JuneThe June issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education enewsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find;  

  • The launch of Fire Prevention Week 2015
  • New American Sign Language video
  • NFPA teams up with Domino's
  • Firework safety tip sheet
  • Educators and behavior change
  • New gas grill safety video
  • Family's escape story featured on PBS Kids

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division, activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog® and more.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb0840e765970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb0840e765970d-800wi|alt=Sparky and Ace on the field|title=Sparky and Ace on the field|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb0840e765970d image-full img-responsive!


 

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More than 40,000 school-age children across greater Toronto and Ontario waved their fire safety banners at the special home game yesterday of the Toronto Blue Jays marked as “Fire Safety Day.” The event took place as part of the fifth annual “[Swing into Summer Safety | http://www.swingintosafety.ca/events]” campaign conducted by the Fire Marshal’s Fire Public Safety Council in partnership with the Toronto Fire Services, and the Toronto Blue Jays.


 

The first 25,000 kids to attend received a special edition baseball collector card deck, showcasing their favorite Toronto Blue Jays players with fire safety tips included. Pre-game activities also included getting to hang out with firefighters, Sparky the Fire Dog ®, and Ace, the Toronto Blue Jays mascot.


Five fire departments from different areas of Ontario hosted a kickoff at the same time as the launch at Rogers Centre: Huron Shores Fire Department, Fire Department of North Huron, Prince Edward County Fire Department, Timmins Fire Department, and Welland Fire and Emergency Services.


The day was capped off with a win by Toronto. The team beat the Miami Marlins, 7 to 2.


"The Council is most grateful to the Toronto Blue Jays and NFPA for their support of this very worthwhile, summer-long fire safety initiative,” said NFPA Public Education Field Advisor for Canada, Art Pullan, pictured above, right with executives from the energy delivery company, Enbridge, one of the campaign’s sponsors, and Chief Lee Grant of the Oakville, Ontario Fire Department. “Together Sparky and Ace bring a fun element to delivering important lifesaving messages to young children throughout Ontario.”


!http://i.zemanta.com/345331521_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345331521_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Learn Not to Burn gets seal of approval in Canada

 

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The North Shore Fire Department in Wisconsin, recipient of the 2015 Rolf H. Jensen Memorial Public Education Grant, is more than halfway to its goal of conducting home safety assessments as part of its “Prevent, Prepare, and React” campaign. So far, 72 of 125 assessments have been completed.


 

A risk analysis of the seven communities the fire department serves showed that the percentage of adults 65 and over was above the national average. In 2014, NFPA awarded the fire department and local health department training through the Remembering When™ Conference to administer fire and fall prevention education to older adults. Since then, the team presented Remembering When to more than 300 residents and conducted 28 home assessments. Data compiled during the assessments showed that none of the homes had properly fitted smoke alarms.


 

North Shore received a grant from Wal-Mart to purchase 100 ten-year smoke alarms . Most have been installed. In addition to providing support for the 125 home safety assessments, The Rolf Jensen Grant is being used to purchase close to 300 smoke alarms to be installed.


The grant provides $5,000 to one local fire department annually to support a community-wide fire and life safety education program or campaign.


“We’re fired up about this program and are out making a difference every day thanks to NFPA,” says North Shore Battalion Chief John Maydak, pictured above at left with Chief Robert Whitaker.


!http://i.zemanta.com/342382705_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/342382705_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Study shows older adults are on the right track for fall prevention

NFPA and Domino’s are teaming up for the eighth year in a row to deliver fire safety messages and pizza during Fire Prevention Week, October 4 -10, 2015. To make this year’s campaign a success once again, we’re encouraging fire departments to join forces with their local Domino’s store and implement the program in their communities.

Domino's logo

Here’s how it works:

  • Select a day and time period (usually 1-3 hours) to randomly choose 1-3 pizza orders to deliver aboard a fire engine. The participating Domino’s delivery expert will follow in his or her car with the pizza order.
  • When the pizza delivery arrives at the customer’s home, the fire department will check the home for working smoke alarms. If the smoke alarms work, the customer's order is free. If the batteries are dead, the fire department will supply the customer with new batteries.

Partnering with Domino’s presents a fun and powerful way to reinforce the campaign’s fire safety messages, so we strongly encourage fire departments to get involved!

Domino’s Fire Prevention Week Sweepstakes

Fire departments that sign up between July 15 and August 1 to participate in the program will automatically be entered into Domino’s FPW Sweepstakes. Domino’s will randomly select five winners who will receive NFPA’s “Fire Prevention Week in a Box 300,” which includes:

  • 1 FPW banner (super-sized 10' x 4')
  • 45 FPW posters (17" x 24")
  • 300 adult FPW brochures
  • 300 kids FPW activity poster
  • 300 FPW stickers
  • 300 FPW magnets
  • 300 FPW news
  • 300 FPW bags

Sign Up to Participate!

If your fire department would like to participate in the NFPA and Domino’s Fire Prevention Week program, please email Dani Nicholl at dani.nicholl@dominos.com. Sign-up emails that are sent between July 15 and August 1 will be entered into the sweepstakes.  The Fire Prevention Week sweepstakes winners will be drawn on August 7 and announced soon after. 

This year's Fire Prevention Week theme is "Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm." Visit www.firepreventionweek.org for a wealth of information and resources to help implement the campaign in your community.

NFPA and Stop & Shop New England Division are teaming up to promote a healthy, safe grilling season aimed at helping ensure an enjoyable summer for all and one that reduces the risk of grilling fires.  S & S

Three out of five households own a gas grill, according to NFPA’s "Home Fires Involving Cooking Equipment," report, which translates to a lot of tasty meals. But it also means there’s an increased risk of home fires. Each year an average of 8,800 home fires are caused by grilling, and close to half of all injuries involving grills are due to thermal burns. While nearly half of the people who grill do so year-round, July is the peak month for grill fires, followed by May, June and August.

This summer, participating Stop & Shop stores in New England will reinforce grilling fire safety messages as well as provide tips for preparing healthy meals with events on Cape Cod and in Rhode Island. Stay tuned for more information about these events. If you're in the area, we hope to see you there!

For more information about grilling fire safety and additional tips and resources, visit www.nfpa.org/grilling.

June paradigm challengeProject Paradigm, in partnership with the American Red Cross, runs The Paradigm Challenge; an annual competition developed to inspire youth to affect positive change in the world. Each month we see a new contest, with great prizes, that helps accomplish this goal. June’s contest, Firefighter Spotlight, has been kicked off and you are invited to participate! 

Firefighters on are the front line when it comes to keeping us safe. This month, youth are being asked to use their creative talents to highlight what firefighters mean to them and their community with an original entry. Everyone else, you are being asked to vote for your favorite! Here's how to enter:

CREATE. Draw, design, sculpt (or whatever else you can dream up) an original entry that represents a firefighter.

SHARE. Upload a photo of your original entry with a message about what firefighters mean to you and your community. Then share with your friends and family to rack up votes. #FirefighterSpotlight

WIN! The 10 entries with the most votes by the end of the month will receive cash prizes of up to $1000.

The ten entries with the most votes will receive cash prizes of up to $1,000.  

Find more information on the Project Paradigm website

FPW 2015
How often should you replace your home's smoke alarms? And, how often do you need to test them?

The 2015 Fire Prevention Week theme is "Hear the Beep where you Sleep. Every bedroom needs working smoke alarms." As a fun way to test your knowledge on smoke alarms, we put together this short Fire Prevention Week quiz. Like years past, take the quiz and see how well you know your smoke alarm fire safety information, as well as find out what you might need a quick refresher on. We make it easy to share results with your friends on Facebook and Twitter as well.

Take the Fire Prevention Week quiz now!

Smoke alarms save lives. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. In fact, having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half! Find more information on smoke alarms by visiting the Fire Prevention week website

Police in Rhode Island are investigating the death of a woman who fell into a fire pit. According to Portable Fireplace Safety Tips SheetWCVB-TV in Boston, South Kingstown, Rhode Island, police say they responded to a 911 call Sunday afternoon stating a woman had fallen into a lit fire pit at a home. Police, fire and EMS officials discovered the woman's body had been pulled out of the fire in the homes' backyard before crews arrived.
      
Police say it is unclear how she got into the fire pit. The state fire marshal and state medical examiner's office are investigating. NFPA's safety tips sheet on portable fireplace safety advises maintaining a three-foot distance from indoor and outdoor fireplaces as a general rule and includes additional tips for maintaining safety.

Fire Engine Dead

In less than two weeks, summer will officially be here. I’ve compiled my summer reading list and the “hottest” choice at the top of my night table stack is a light mystery called Fire Engine Dead. It’s part of the publisher’s “Museum Mystery” series. The synopsis on the back of the book is enticing: "Nell Pratt, president of the Pennsylvania Antiquarian Society in Philadelphia, has to spark her intuition to find an arsonist/murderer whose identity is veiled in smoke. Valuable pieces in storage from the Fireman's Museum go up in flames and a guard is killed in the blaze.”

Now here’s your challenge: How many fire-themed novels can you come up with that feature “Fire,” “Flame,” or “Smoke” in the title? Click on the “comments” link below to respond. I just might add your titles to my list.

Last weekend, firefighters in Southeast Portland (Oregon) responded to a house fire started by a grill. According to officials quoted in The Oregonian, the grill was left unattended on the back deck. The fire then spread to the side of the home and into the attic. Thankfully, no injuries were reported but family members now have to find alternative housing because of the extensive damage to the home.

Grill FireEach year an average of 8,800 home fires are caused by grilling, and the summer months are the time when grilling fires happen most often, with July being the peak month followed by May, June and August.

We know cookouts and BBQ's are some of the best events to host, but they can also be dangerous. This story in Portland is a serious reminder about what can happen when we don't take the necessary precautions and put safety first. Before your next outdoor event, take a few minutes to review some grilling fire safety tips from NFPA including our latest videos that tackle the following:

* The correct way to turn your grill on and off safely

* The steps you need to follow when your grill won't ignite

The tips are simple but effective; the videos are short. Both resources will go a long way to making your cookouts safe and fun for you and your guests. Share them with friends and family before your next get-together. You'll be glad you did.

Over the next few months, play it fire safety smart. Then relax and enjoy a wonderful grilling season all summer long!

Photo courtesy of Dick Harris, Portland Fire Photographer in The Oregonian

 

Since March, the Thomasville Fire Department has been preparing for its biggest fire safety event of the year, Safety Fest, which is held during Fire Prevention Week (FPW). For the past four years, the fire department, located in Thomasville, North Carolina, has partnered with the Thomasville Funeral !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d1203d82970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d1203d82970c-800wi|alt=FPW in a Box|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=FPW in a Box|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d1203d82970c img-responsive! Home in hosting this event. More than 20 area agencies are invited and hundreds of residents attend.


“The funeral home is right by our local library and between the funeral home and the library, it’s a great fit. It’s thinking outside the box,” says Thomasville Fire Department Division Chief Dolly Hulin. “The funeral home doesn’t book any funerals that afternoon. That gives us plenty of parking there and at the library.”


 

Hulin says the department’s resource for fire safety educational materials for Safety Fest is FPW in a Box. “It’s a one-stop-shopping kit. We have a volunteer who puts everything into goody bags and we’re ‘good to go’ for Fire Prevention Week.” This year the funeral home will be serving hot dogs so that families can have a meal when they come to Safety Fest.


 

She said she and other officials in her department feel comfortable making the purchase of FPW items because they also have the resources of the number of free materials NFPA makes available for the fire service.


!http://i.zemanta.com/345281519_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345281519_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA announces theme for Fire Prevention Week 2015

!http://i.zemanta.com/342165909_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/342165909_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Article in the new NFPA Journal explores how food truck fire safety has suddenly become impossible to ignore

 

Working smoke alarms in the home provide life-saving potential from fire. That’s a fact we all know well, and it’s one that’s been strongly promoted over the years.

But how often do we educate the public about where smoke alarms should be located in the home? More pointedly, how often are we promoting the importance of having a working smoke alarm in each bedroom?

Not often enough, according to an informal, online quiz we posted last year, which showed that less than half (42 percent) of approximately 36,000 respondents did not know that a smoke alarm should be installed in each bedroom of the home.

In an effort to better educate the public about this “sleepy” smoke alarm requirement, NFPA – the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years – announced “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm” as the theme for this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, October 4-10, 2015. NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code®, requires a smoke alarm in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home.

Half of all U.S. home fire deaths occur at night between the hours of 11:00pm and 7:00am, when people are most likely to be sleeping. Having a working smoke alarm in the home cuts the risk of dying in a fire in half. These facts underscore the extreme importance of having working smoke alarms in all bedrooms.

NFPA will be teaming up with its Fire Prevention Week partners – USFA, Domino’s, The Home Depot, CVS Health, LEGOLAND® Florida and LEGOLAND® California to promote “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm” through a series of fun, engaging events and activities this fall. For more information about smoke alarms and this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, visit www.firepreventionweek.org.

 


 


 

NFPA has produced an American Sign Language video for Fire Prevention Week (FPW) 2015. In the video, which includes a voice-over and open captioning, the public is reminded about the importance of having working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement.


 

Information is provided on smoke alarms and alert devices for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. The video is one of many tools the fire service can use for FPW campaigns, other fire safety presentations, and reaching those at high riskfor fire deaths and injuries. The video also appeals to a general audience.


!http://i.zemanta.com/345281519_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345281519_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA announces theme for Fire Prevention Week 2015

Curriculum Services Canada LogoCurriculum Services Canada (CSC) has given its seal of quality to the Fire Marshal's Public Fire Safety Council for the Canadian version and French translation of NFPA’s Learn Not to Burn® educational program for preschool, kindergarten, and level 1.

A not-for-profit organization that supports the needs of learners, CSC is Canada's standards agency for the accreditation of Canadian educational resources and also develops a wide spectrum of customized learning resources for academic and organizational environments. CSC works with government agencies, NGOs, and private organizations across Canada to develop and evaluate print, multimedia, and web-based resources that support learning.

Lntblevel1cover“Learn Not to Burn went through a stringent review by CSC,” says Art Pullan, NFPA’s Public Education Division field advisor for Canada. “Because of this endorsement, teachers and the school system will see the program as a credible Canadian resource.”

The program will be introduced to members of the fire service throughout Ontario who attend the September 16th Learn Not to Burn workshop in Toronto. The workshop is sponsored by the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council in partnership with the Toronto Fire Service. In addition, educators across Canada will be encouraged to use this valuable resource.

NFPA is excited to announce the Fire Prevention Week (FPW) theme for 2015: “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm.”

Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. We need your help to spread the message about the importance of having working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement.

NFPA has everything you need for a successful campaign. Tools for the fire service, include step-by-step instructions for implementing an FPW campaign, sample news releases and social media posts, sample local and state proclamations, and free customizable safety tips sheets.

Materials for teachers include interactive lessons and activities, music and movement fire-safety videos, free storybook apps, and Common Core-aligned lesson plans, and take home materials.

For kids and families, the Sparky the Fire Dog® web site has tons of fun. Hidden pictures, fun printables and a new smoke alarm checklist to do with the family.

Looking to enhance your program? Check out our FPW “must haves.” Your fire station will be the talk of the town with this year’s banner. We have all new products to make your job easier.

Follow the Safety Source blog for FPW product and program highlights throughout the summer. It's time to start planning for October!

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