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2015

Judy presenting 2
Judy Comoletti, manager of NFPA's public education division, is attended by Detroit Fire Department's Captain Christopher Dixon (left) and Detroit Fire Commissioner Edsel Jenkins (right) as she teaches students about smoke alarms.

NFPA's 8th annual Fire Prevention Week campaign with Domino’s officially kicked off yesterday at the Detroit Fire Department’s Fire Engine 27, where 75 second graders from Detroit’s Mayberry Elementary School were treated to fire safety lessons supporting this year’s theme, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm”, along with a visit from Sparky the Fire Dog® and a pizza party. The event culminated in a send-off of the Detroit Fire Department and Domino’s, who made the first smoke alarm check and pizza delivery to a local family.

The festivities received quite a bit of local media attention, too, including live interviews with Detroit’s FOX news affiliate throughout the morning.

Judy interviewed by FOX

As a quick reminder, here’s how the campaign works: Customers who order from participating Domino’s stores during Fire Prevention Week will be randomly selected to have their delivery arrive from the local fire aboard a fire engine. If the smoke alarms in the home are working, the pizza is free. If they’re not working, the firefighters will replace the batteries or install fully-functioning alarms.

Pizza delivered to family

A huge thanks to all the fire departments that work with local Domino’s to locally implement the campaign each year. It’s a fun, engaging way to educate residents about smoke alarm safety and make families safer from fire, and we truly appreciate your participation!

Nevada ProclamationGovernor Brian Sandoval has proclaimed October 4-10 Fire Prevention Week (FPW) in the state of Nevada. The governor is doing his part to help boost awareness about the fire safety campaign and make the O-BRIAN-SANDOVAL-BACKGROUND-CHECKS-facebookpublic aware of the importance of having working smoke alarms. Governor Sandoval is one of many officials across the United States and Canada signing proclamations for FPW.

NFPA’s media materials include sample gubernatorial and mayoral proclamations that can be used to spotlight the fire safety work of first responders in your city, state, or province, and help reinforce the lifesaving messages associated with this year’s theme. A proclamation-signing ceremony can be a great photo opportunity for the media, and valuable exposure for a fire department.

Safety SourceThe September issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education enewsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find;  

  • Sparky’s Brain Busters, a free trivia–based app launched for Fire Prevention Week
  • New video featuring Casey Grant, Lessons from History: The Great Chicago Fire of 1871
  • Tip sheet highlights pets and fire safety
  • Lab safety tip sheet for teachers and students
  • NFPA’s educator web site gets redesign for Fire Prevention Week
  • Sparky hits the streets to find out about smoke alarms 

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division, activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog® and more.

As the summer comes to an end and we prepare to enjoy more indoor activities, it is important to make sure that home heating appliances are operated properly.  NFPA has a wonderful safety tip sheet about heating safety. It references standards NFPA 97 and NFPA 211, with information about how to safely install and use home heating appliances.  It is so nice to curl up by the fireplace or wood stove with a cup of cocoa, blanket and your pet close by, and even nicer to know that you are safe while doing so.

Some tips to consider are: Puppy

  • Make sure that the equipment is properly installed and vented.
  • Install a carbon dioxide alarm and test. 
  • Make sure that you have a working smoke alarm.
  • Keep anything that can burn (such as paper or wood) three feet away from all heating appliances. 
  • Have chimneys and vents cleaned and inspected by a professional.     
  • Only use the recommended fuel.
  • Dispose of hot ash properly.   Ashes should be cool when placed in a metal container that is kept away from the home.   
  • Never use the oven to heat your home. 
  • Make sure that you have a spark screen in front of the fireplace.
  • Make sure that you have a properly installed chimney cap.  
  • Make sure that tree limbs are 10 feet away and never overhanging the chimney. Keep leaves and pine needles off the roof.

Remember most heating fires occur during the winter months.  Be warm and safe this autumn and winter as we embrace a Year of Living Less Dangerously From Wildfire. YLLDW Banner

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d15d009f970c-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d15d009f970c-320wi|alt=Tennessee Smoke Alarm Saves Life|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Tennessee Smoke Alarm Saves Life|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d15d009f970c img-responsive!A Clarksville, Tennessee, man learned first-hand the meaning behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week (FPW) theme: Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm.


 

According to WKRN-TV, Mardoche Olivie started cooking early Sunday morning, sat down on the couch, and fell asleep. He woke up to the sound of the smoke alarm and was able to escape the fire. The day before, firefighters and the American Red Cross had given him the smoke alarm. They came to his home as part of a campaign to install alarms in older home that didn’t have them.


“It was meant to save my life and that’s what it did,” said Olivie.


 

NFPA’s Smoke Alarm Central and FPW remind the public to install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement. Larger homes may need additional alarms.


!http://i.zemanta.com/353886254_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/353886254_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Practice makes a difference when fire strikes home of fire safety educator

  Kids Get the Pancakes

Residents of Sparks, Nevada, are very familiar with this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm. The Sparks Fire Department has distributed the FPW poster throughout the community in stores and businesses.

In addition, the department is offering fire safety presentations during October to businesses, schools, day care centers, homeowners’ associations, and civic groups. Cutting open car

FPW activities begin with the 26th annual pancake breakfast/open house October 3rd sponsored by the fire department and the Sparks Firefighters’ Association.  (The photo above is from last year's breakfast).The day includes exhibits of fire prevention materials, live demonstrations, tours of the fire station, a raffle, and puppet show.

Sparks Fire Department Division Chief and Fire Marshal Bob King says Fire Prevention Week in a Box provides the materials the department needs to make the pancake breakfast/open house and all of the community activities a success.

Falls event

Today I attended a media event to celebrate Falls Prevention Awareness Day on this first day of Fall.  This event focused on the epidemic of falls and their devastating effects to seniors and their families when they experience one.  This was also a kickoff to a statewide effort in NC to help seniors through home visits called the Home S.A.F.E Program.  The NC Association of Community Development Corporations, in partnership with USDA Rural Development, AARP, and the Falls Prevention Coalition announced this initiative to help senior adults identify hazards in their homes and make affordable safety modifications.  NFPA provides fire and fall prevention messages including home visits and smoke alarm installations- with our Remembering When program.  This web based educational program has all the tools you need for group presentations, home visits, and smoke alarm installations.  New to the online program is a fire and fall prevention brochure as well as a one page home safety checklist.  Let’s all help insure that senior adults live safely and happily in their homes! If you are looking for a fun and interactive way to teach fire and fall safety to senior adults- this is the program for you.  Great job NC with this partnership as they welcome “Fall” with a safety spin.

Rememberingwhenbook

learn.jpgIn time for Fire Prevention Week 2015, Fire Safety Canada, in conjunction with the Council of Canadian Fire Chiefs and Fire Commissioners, just released the first Canadian edition of NFPA’s Learn Not to Burn® (LNTB) program.

 

Teachers, educators, and parents across Canada can benefit from free access to the made-for-Canada edition of LNTB, to complement community Fire Prevention Week initiatives, October 4-10. Teachers have been invited to download free lessons and parents are encouraged to support the effort at home by using the online family fire safety activities. The online activities and in-class lessons are in step with this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm.

 

On the web site and in the classroom, children learn how to recognize the smoke alarm beep, what to do when it sounds, the fundamentals of a home fire escape plan, and to stay away from hot things.

Learn Not to Burn has served as the pillar of NFPA educational programs for more than 40 years and uses proven educational strategies that incorporate NFPA’s philosophy of teaching positive, practical fire safety messaging.

Pet Fire Safety Tips Sheet

Cat Perch 2Because of my cat Savannah’s insatiable desire to leap on all kinds of surfaces in my home–furniture, countertops, appliances–and her ability to find new and creative ways to knock things over, claw at them, and chew through them, I’ve spent countless hours figuring out how to “cat-proof” my home to keep her safe and my belongings relatively intact.

NFPA’s Pet Fire Safety tip sheet reminds us that our pets’ habits can be more than just mildly annoying. Pets can cause fires. The tip sheet, as well as many other tips sheets NFPA provides, can be customized with the fire department or organization’s name and contact information.

In addition, through NFPA’s Take Action: Teens for Wildfire Safe Communities campaign, the nation’s youth can play a role in helping minimize the chances of a wildland fire impacting their homes and lives. Two great resources are the toolkits on household pets and horses.

 


 

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In many parts of the country, cold weather is on its way. It’s a time when our thoughts turn to furnaces, fireplaces, and space heaters. NFPA’s heating safety information tells us that half of home heating equipment fires are reported during the months of December, January, and February.


Some simple steps can help us stay warm while preventing most heating-related fires from happening.


    • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.

    • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.

    • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room.

Test smoke alarms at least once a month, using the test button.


 

You can find more tips on the heating safety tips sheet. For the fire service, the heating equipment safety toolkit includes everything needed to teach residents of a community how to heat their homes safely.


!http://i.zemanta.com/353886254_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/353886254_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Practice makes a difference when fire strikes home of fire safety educator

 

In anticipation of Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, today we’re launching the third video in our “Smoke Alarm Smarts” series, which addresses smoke alarm replacement. As you’ll see, when Sparky the Fire Dog® randomly asked people how often they think smoke alarms in the home need to be replaced, he gets a lot of guesses in response.

We encourage all fire departments, fire safety educators and others to share this video on their social media platforms, websites and via email – it’s a quick, engaging way to reinforce a basic but vital message about smoke alarm safety: smoke alarms need to be replaced every 10 years.

(Tip: To figure out when the smoke alarms in your home need to be replaced, look on the back of the smoke alarm for the date of manufacture. Smoke alarms should be replaced 10 years from that date. Immediately replace any smoke alarm that does not respond properly when tested.)

For more information on Fire Prevention Week 2015 and this year’s theme, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm”, visit www.firepreventionweek.org

Sparky float 1 (2)

Sparky the Fire Dog® loves a celebration, especially when he can combine fun with sharing the important message of fire safety. That was the case September 20th when he participated in the 250th Sparky and Patriot Anniversary Grand Parade for the town of Sharon, Massachusetts.

Sharon, which became a town in 1765, is celebrating all year long. So far, the commemoration has included an arts and music festival, bike tour, anniversary ball, a community service project, a historic walking tour, and triathlon.

During the parade, Sparky rode a float, which was sponsored by the Sharon Fire Department.

He reminded the public of the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home and also made time to hang out with New England Patriot’s mascot, Pat Patriot.

Kid climbs down ladder

The City of Elko Fire Department in Elko, Nevada, expects to draw a record crowd to the annual Fire Prevention Picnic this weekend. The fire department and its partners in education anticipate promoting fire prevention and household safety information to more than 2,000 residents and visitors at the main city park.

Fire Marshal Joshua Carson says a key element to making the picnic a success each year is the Fire  Prevention Week material the department distributes, particularly Fire Prevention Week in a Box. FPW IN A BOX

“It’s already pre-organized for us to use,” he says. “We do such a high volume for this event. It makes it easy to put it together. All of the children are getting the same content.  It helps get the word out to our community.”

More than 20 safety booths and displays will be part of the day’s event. Firefighters are scheduled to perform a live fire response and extinguish a live fire burn prop.

Additional exhibits include a fire apparatus tour, children’s hose drag races, live fire extinguisher training, a home escape wall and fire sprinkler and fire alarm exhibits.

Elko is observing Fire Prevention Week a week before the campaign’s official start because of the potential for cold weather.

  Banner 8.26.15

  CO Awareness group (2)

Today is Carbon Monoxide Awareness Day in Tennessee. This week, Austin Peay State University hosted an event at Kenwood High School, in Clarksville, to announce the establishment of a new scholarship in memory of a high school teacher who died from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

Eighteen-year-old Skylar Hughes presented APSU President Alisa White with a $25,000 check for the creation of the Kathryn Watson Over Endowment. The scholarship, named for Over–Hughes' former teacher–will be awarded each year to a Kenwood High graduate who plans to major in education at APSU.

On Sept. 18, 2011, Over, her husband, Jon, and three friends, died of CO poisoning while sleeping in an RV at the annual Bikers Who Care Toy Run event.

“She was the first person who took an interest in helping me,” Hughes said of her teacher. An eighth grade student at the time of the tragedy, Hughes went to work raising awareness about the dangers of CO. In 2012, her efforts led to the creation of Carbon Monoxide Awareness Day in Clarksville. Earlier this summer, Governor Bill Haslam signed a bill, sponsored by State Representative Joe Pitts and State Senator Mark Green, designating September 18 of each year as Carbon Monoxide Awareness Day in Tennessee.

Hughes also began raising money for the establishment of the scholarship in Over’s name at APSU. With help from Over’s parents, the $25,000 mark was reached earlier this year.

LNTB Training at Bus

More than 100 participants spent today at Toronto Fire Services Training Academy at a free, one-day train-the-trainer workshop that demonstrated best practices and resources of NFPA’s Learn Not to Burn® (LNTB) program. The workshop also kicked off the launch of the official LNTB Canadian Version.

Speakers included NFPA Public Education Division Manager Judy Comoletti (first person on right), LNTBkmedical professionals, fire officials, and a burn prevention advocate. NFPA Public Education Field Advisor Art Pullan (center left) helped coordinate the event, which was organized by the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council in partnership with Toronto Fire Services.

 Learn Not to Burn has served as the pillar of NFPA educational programs for more than 40 years and uses proven educational strategies that incorporate NFPA’s philosophy of teaching positive, practical fire safety messaging.  

Local fire departments are critical to the success of Fire Prevention Week - we count on their participation and support each year to reach local communities with the campaign's fire safety messages.

FPW Challenge 2015

In appreciation of those efforts, we’re kicking off the Fire Prevention Week 2015 Challenge, which works to recognize the hard work and creativity of fire departments that are actively promoting Fire Prevention Week in their communities this fall.

Here’s how the Fire Prevention Week 2015 Challenge works: All U.S. fire departments are invited to send NFPA a picture of an event they’ve hosted in support of Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm.” Pictures can be submitted for an event a fire department has held anytime between now and October 31, 2015. The application is available online at www.nfpa.org/firepreventionweek.

Participating in the Challenge activity also fulfills the requirements of the Federal Emergency Management Association’s (FEMA) Preparathon!® campaign, which works to increase the number of Americans who understand the disasters most relevant their community, while educating them on ways to be safer and mitigate damage.

A total of 10 winners will be randomly selected to receive a free NFPA Fire Safety Sports Box (valued at $420), which includes:

  • Sparky®'s Team Up For Fire Safety Flag (4' x 6')
  • 1 Fire Safety Activities for your Team Sports Brochure (11" x 17" folds to 8.5" x 11", 4-color)
  • 100 All-Star Fire Safety Brochures
  • 100 Sparky's Team Up for Fire Safety Soft Slap Bracelets
  • 100 Sparky's Team Up for Fire Safety Drawstring Sports Bags
  • 100 Sparky's Team Up for Fire Safety Tattoos
  • 100 Sparky's Team Up for Fire Safety Water Bottles (not intended for children under the age of five)

All winners will be notified and announced in November, and their events will be promoted on Safety Source, NFPA’s public education newsletter; NFPA’s social media platforms and website; and featured in a blog highlighting their efforts.

 


 

Take the Fire Prevention Week (FPW) 2015 Challenge. Help us reach more people with this year’s important message, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm."


 

NFPA is looking for fire departments across the United States to show us your best FPW activity for a chance to win a Fire Safety Sports Box, which includes one Sparky's® Team Up For Fire Safety Flag, !http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d1558d92970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d1558d92970c-800wi|alt=FPW IN A BOX|style=margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;|title=FPW IN A BOX|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d1558d92970c img-responsive! All-Star Fire Safety brochures, Sparky’s Team Up for Fire Safety soft slap bracelets, drawstring sports bags, water bottles and more.


 

It's as easy as 1, 2, 3, as NFPA Public Education Senior Project Manager Karen Berard-Reed explains in this video . Complete the 2015 Fire Prevention Week Challenge application to enter the random drawing. Ten Fire Safety Sports Boxes will be awarded.


 

*Conducting an activity also fulfills the requirements of FEMA’s Preparathon!® campaign, which works to increase the number of Americans who understand the disasters most relevant to their community, while educating them on ways to be safe and mitigate damage.


 

*Rules*


    • Local fire departments and state fire marshals’ offices are eligible to enter.

    • 10 random winners will receive a Fire Safety Sports Box.

    • All entries must be received by midnight October 31, 2015.

See the complete list of official rules.</li> </ul>

 

People may have as little as one to two minutes to safely escape a home fire from the time the smoke alarm sounds. That’s information everyone should know. Unfortunately, not everyone does. As you’ll see in this "Smoke Alarm Smarts” video – the second in our weekly series of four leading up to Fire Prevention Week – when Sparky the Fire Dog® asks people how long they have to safely escape a home fire from the time the smoke alarm sounds, he gets lots of different answers.

As Fire Prevention Week fast-approaches, we’re working to promote basic but vital smoke alarm messages. Please help us spread the word by sharing this video on your website and/or social media.

For more information on Fire Prevention Week 2015, October 4-10, and this year’s theme, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm”, visit www.firepreventionweek.org.

 

 If you take a peek inside of Sparky’s Coloring Book, you’ll be treated to a delightful story about a visit to a firehouse with Sparky the Fire Dog®. This “must-have” for Fire Prevention Week helps young kids learn about smoke alarms and the proper way to respond if they hear a smoke alarm sound in their home.

Another must-have is Sparky’s Activity Book. In this video, NFPA Public Education Division Senior Project Manager Karen Berard-Reed talks about how these materials make learning fun and can enhance your FPW campaign.

 

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Country singer and songwriter Chris Young has donated items for auction, raising money to secure musical instruments for children. He’s supported a children’s hospital and donated money to a school for the arts.


 

His philanthropic efforts also extend to fire and life safety. According to radio station KSCJ , before performing in concert in Sioux City, Iowa, last weekend, Young donated to Sioux City Fire Rescue 100 smoke alarms with nonreplaceable batteries designed to be effective for up to 10 years.


Young has made smoke alarm donations in the past and has said he wants to do his part to support the safety of residents and the nation’s first responders.


!http://i.zemanta.com/355674175_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/355674175_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Vacation venue offers reminder about battery precautions

 

Youth sporting events are the perfect venue to reach the kids, parents, and family members with the message of fire safety. It’s just a matter of setting up a display table and opening up NFPA’s Fire Safety Sports Box, which is filled with all kinds of goodies kids and teens will love. In this video, NFPA Public Education Division Senior Project Manager Karen Berard-Reed talks about all the neat items the sports box has to offer.

 

What’s inside FPW in a Box? In a new video, NFPA Public Education Division Senior Project Manager Karen Berard-Reed answers that question and gives a description of some of the featured items in the box that’s chock full of fire safety products, including the FPW banner, poster, magnets and stickers.

In the video, Karen also talks about the Fire Prevention Week theme: Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm.

Rolf Jensen Grant ApplicationApplications are being accepted for the 2016 Rolf H. Jensen Memorial Public Education Grant. The $5,000 grant is presented annually to a local fire department to support a community-wide fire and life safety education program or campaign. The grant is open to any fire department–career or volunteer–located in the United States or Canada.

The North Shore Fire Department of Wisconsin is the winner of the 2015 grant, which supports the continuation of the department’s “Prevent, Prepare, and React” home assessment and smoke alarm installation campaign.

The deadline for applications is February 5, 2016. The grant committee encourages applications from new and previous candidates.

 

How smart is the general public about smoke alarms? That’s what we wanted to find out!

In support of this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm”, we sent Sparky the Fire Dog® out on the street to ask people basic questions about smoke alarms.

In this “Smoke Alarm Smarts” video - the first in a series of four - see what people know (and don’t) about smoke alarms. This clip addresses how often smoke alarms should be tested; the upcoming videos will be posted weekly in anticipation of Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, 2015, each focusing on a specific smoke alarm message. 

Don’t be shy about using these videos! Share them on your social media platforms, post them on your website, or wherever you think you’ll reach the most people with their smoke alarm messages.

For more information on Fire Prevention Week or to find a wealth of resources for promoting the campaign in your community, visit www.firepreventionweek.org.

 

It just got a little easier to learn about new resources from NFPA to help you make your 2015 Fire Prevention Week a success. In a new video, NFPA Public Education Division Senior Project Manager Karen Berard-Reed gives highlights on materials for the fire service, teachers, and kids and families.

There’s the infographic in different formats that the fire service can place in local newspapers and on social media as well as the 30-minute coffee time chat, a guide for a conversation on the topic of smoke alarms and the importance of having working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.

The video also provides details about educational tools on Sparky’s School House for teachers and activity sheets for kids and families.  

The State of Kentucky has continuously ranked in the top 10 States in civilian fire deaths.  This information is shared in the opening sentence of an article in the September issue of Kentucky Living Magazine.  At the time of the article’s release, 37 people had been killed in residential fires since the beginning of 2015.  In January of 2014, a single home fire in Greenville, Kentucky alone, claimed the lives of 9 family members.   

These facts are sobering for Kentuckians, but they are not taking it lightly.  Fire Safety stakeholders called a meeting in early June, and along with the Kentucky State Fire Marshal, The Kentucky Association of Fire Chiefs, and The Kentucky Firefighters Association, NFPA took a seat at the table.  There was consensus for the grave need for fire safety education across the State, and while the group also agreed that typical “high-risk” age groups of the very young and the very old were still needed, the young adult and middle-aged adult population had emerged as a target demographic for some vital safety messages.  “We’ve come to realize that adults age 25-65 are the decision-makers in most families.  If they are not on board with fire safety, then the rest of the family living in the home cannot be on board, either” stated Greg Schultz, public education chairman for the Kentucky Firefighters Association and the State Representative for the NFPA Public Education Network.  And Shultz is one individual who is helping to lead the fire-safety charge.  Just a few weeks earlier, Shultz had the opportunity to combine Public Education with Recruitment at the Boone County Fair. The gate show attendance peaked around 18,000 and above it he displayed an NFPA 2015 Fire Prevention Week Banner with the message “Hear the Beep Where you Sleep – Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!” Several people stopped to ask Schultz the meaning behind the slogan. “It appears the slogan is making people think about the concept”.  And that’s exactly what he wants them to do.

Clothes Dryer Photo

“Do you know where the lint filter is?” My husband asked that question as he clutched a load of laundry in his arms. He had just washed and dried his first load in our new laundry center, a vertical washer and dryer unit designed to fit into tight spaces, like our condo’s closet-sized laundry area.

I’d already read through the manual, but he hadn’t. I opened the dryer door and pulled out the kidney-shaped lint filter in the back of the tumbler. I was surprised to see the thick layer of lint the basket had collected. Washersafetytips

NFPA’s Clothes Dryer Safety tips sheet advises cleaning the lint filter before and after each load, but actually removing the lint myself made me realize how quickly it can accumulate and become a fire hazard.

The tips sheet also advises removing lint that has collected around the drum, and–doing as I did–reading the manufacturer’s operating instructions. The dryers and washing machines page of the NFPA website provides reports and facts and figures on these kinds of fires. The safety tips sheet is also available in Spanish.

Doesn’t it seem like summer just got started? I can hardly believe that September is here and with Labor Day around the corner, like the rest of us, you’re probably already thinking about the details of your big weekend party. I would venture to guess, too, that whatever the meal is you have planned, a grill will most certainly take center stage. That’s where we come in.

NFPA has created a number of great fire safety resources that can be helpful when you’re cooking up a bounty of veggies, meat and fish on the grill. How about a quick refresher? Our latest grilling video puts everyday people to the test and asks them, “Do you know the proper way to safely use a grill?” The answers may surprise you. Take a look and see how your knowledge stacks up!

 

Need to fill that propane tank before you turn on the grill? Our “Simple Test for Checking Gas Grill Leaks” video is a quick and easy way to get all the information you need to prepare your grill safely before the guests arrive.

 

Find these videos and a whole lot more on NFPA’s grilling fire safety webpage at www.nfpa.org/grilling. And while you’re there, take the opportunity to download our tips sheet and share it with friends and family.

Enjoy the holidays and stay safe, everyone!

Family Dinners
Each summer it's probably the same in your house as in mine; meals on the run, impromptu parties filled with light snacks for friends, sleepovers and "junk food" for the kids. When you look back at the blur of what was July and August, I bet the kitchen wasn't a place you spent oodles of time in. But that all changes once the fall hits, right? Students head back to school, vacations wind down and the cooler days invite more structure around meals.

According to Good Housekeeping Magazine, this September marks the launch of National Family Meals Month, a perfect time to cook up those great recipes you've collected over the summer and share more time in the kitchen with your family. National Family Meals Month is an industry-wide movement to raise awareness of the benefits of eating together by bringing families back to the table to share one more meal at home per week.

Of course, with more time spent inside and at the stove, NFPA wants you to keep fire safety top of mind. So, when you're in the kitchen this fall, you'll want to remember these few key tips :

  • Keep an eye on what you fry
  • Be alert when cooking
  • Keep things that can catch fire away from cooking area

Check out some of NFPA's other great resources for cooking fire safety on its webpage. And, as you talk about the importance of scheduling more family time around the table, you can feel great knowing you're also sharing important fire safety information like tips sheets and videos with family and friends.

So go ahead and enjoy the bounty of food that Fall brings. Bring your family together for more laughs and conversation at the table, and work as a family team to make fire safety a priority whenever you're in the kitchen. Why not start today? Make September your starting point ... Got a great recipe to share? What did you do to incorporate more family time around the table this month? We'd love to hear from you. Tell us today!

Learn more at www.nfpa.org/cooking.

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September is Campus Fire Safety Month and this year, NFPA, The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center), the University of New Haven Fire Science Club, (UNH) and Domino's are teaming up to host a national campaign and Campus Fire Safety Sweepstakes & Contest (Contest) that raises awareness of fire safety on college campuses.

The two-tiered Contest, which starts today, September 1, and runs through the 25th, can be found on the Campus Fire Safety for Students Facebook page and targets students currently enrolled in an institution of higher education. The Contest encourages students to put fire safety first, and provides a host of student, parent and fire safety educator resources that focus on the dangers of candles and unattended cooking, in addition to highlighting smoke alarm education, evacuation plans and more. These resources have been designed for sharing via social media, on college websites, and for posting in dorms and on common area bulletin boards and include:

  • Fire safety questions to ask landlords and school officials
  • Videos
  • Checklists
  • Tips Sheets
  • Infographics and flyers

Students who complete the first tier of the Contest will be entered into a sweepstakes where two winners will be randomly selected to win a Domino's-sponsored pizza party for 50 of their friends. Students can also submit a 200-word paragraph about the steps they will take to help keep themselves and their peers safer from fire. One winner from the second-tier will be eligible to win an iPad mini 3! Read the complete rules and enter today!

According to NFPA statistics, fires in dormitories, fraternities, sororities and student barracks increased 24 percent from 3,350 fires in 2003 to 4,160 fires in 2013. The Center states that from 2000 through October 2014, 126 students died in 89 fires on college campuses, in Greek housing, or in privately owned off-campus housing within three miles of the campus. Of those, 107 deaths occurred in fires in off-campus housing. At least four fatal off-campus fires have occurred this year, including deaths in South Dakota, Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Washington D.C.

With the start of the school year almost upon us, help us spread the word and raise fire safety awareness on college campuses starting with the students you love! Share our contest video and rules and check out NFPA's and The Center's webpage for the materials you need to start the discussion.

Join the fire safety movement on college campuses in your area! Learn more today!

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb086ba781970d-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb086ba781970d-800wi|alt=Baltimore Smoke Alarm Installation|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Baltimore Smoke Alarm Installation|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb086ba781970d img-responsive!A member of Baltimore City Council joined dozens of firefighters recently in a neighborhood smoke alarm sweep.


 

According to WJZ-TV, City Councilman Warren Branch went door-to-door with fire officials to talk to residence about the importance of fire safety. This comes after seven fatal fires in the city this year.


At residents’ request firefighters will install smoke alarms inside of homes to help prevent such tragedies from happening.


 

NFPA’s Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program includes tips for conducting a smoke alarm canvassing and strategies for gaining the public’s interest in a smoke alarm installation program. In addition, Smoke Alarm Central is a complete source of smoke alarm information.


!http://i.zemanta.com/noimg_114_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/noimg_114_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!“Get Alarmed” campaign in Tuscaloosa is still going strong

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