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2015

Dangers of Too Much Stuff

In February of 2012 NFPA published a journal article on hoarding – The Dangers of Too Much Stuff.  It remains one of the top Journal stories, as it featured a topic that had long been a known threat in the fire service, but had recently captured the interest and fascination of Americans through popular television programs that took the public into very private situations of hoarding.

As a Regional Public Education Specialist, I have presented on this topic for several years, and the interest from the fire service has not yet waned.  In fact, the interest has increased.  In-depth questions now take up a large percentage of the presentation time as fire service professionals delve deeper into their leadership and commitment to hoarding task forces in their communities.  Recently at the Michigan Fire Inspector Society's Conference, it was standing room only in 2 separate presentations, and lengthy conversations followed both sessions.  News of those presentations and a similar one for the Michigan Fire Instructor Association’s Conference caught the media’s attention in Michigan as well.  Both The Grand Rapids Press, and National Public Radio’s program host Cynthia Canty reached out to NFPA for more information.

The question is no longer “where do we go from here”?  It is “how do we keep going from here?”  In relation to hoarding task forces, dedicated staff, funding, and privacy issues are just a few of the topics that are up for discussion. Thankfully NFPA continues to keep a pulse on this complex, challenging and important topic.  Educational material and resources continue to be available on the NFPA website and the Public Education Division remains devoted to help.

Halloween is a fun and spooky time of the year for kids who love to dress up and get lots of treats to eat. It’s also the perfect time to remind everyone about trick-or-treating safely. For anyone wanting to raise safety awareness before the big event, NFPA’s Halloween Safety tip sheet offers simple fire safety precautions about costumes, decorative materials, and Halloween parties. Porchpumpkins

The Halloween Safety Tips for Children video offers safety precautions as well, and you can review the latest “creepy-crawly” Halloween fire safety tips from NFPA on the Martha Stewart Living website. While you’re at it, check out NFPA’s Halloween safety web page.

Smoke alarms installed in a South Lubbock, Texas, home are credited with saving the family inside when a fire damaged the home last week.

According to KAMC News, officials with the American Red Cross say that the home was one of about 160 residences visited by the Red Cross as part of an initiative to decrease fire-related deaths nationwide by 25 percent.

Family members say they were sleeping when the smoke alarms alerted them to get out.

The home was fitted with three smoke alarms a week and a half before the fire.

The Red Cross, partnering with the South Plains Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, installed Smoke Alarm toolkit314 smoke alarms in the Lubbock County area.

NFPA offers tools for fire departments and community organizations interested in initiating a smoke alarm campaign. Tips for installing and maintaining smoke alarms are provided in the document, “Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program.”

In addition, NFPA’s toolkit on smoke alarms includes everything needed to launch a smoke alarm awareness campaign.

Desk ReferenceThe messages contained in the NFPA Educational Messages Desk Reference are used throughout NFPA’s educational programs, curricula, and handouts and provide fire and life safety educators with accurate and consistent language for use when providing safety information to the public.

The Educational Messages Advisory Committee, a group of fire and life safety experts, will be meeting next spring to update and revise the messages.

The comment period is now open for submitting comments for revision to the Desk Reference. The electronic submission form is for individuals who want to provide substantiated comments on the current message document. The deadline for submissions is February 26, 2016.

 

Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week is underway in many communities. The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness that carbon monoxide (CO) can kill. More than 400 people die each year in the United States from CO poisoning.

NFPA provides free materials that can be used to raise awareness about this invisible killer and help prevent CO poisoning. The “Keeping Your Community Safe with Carbon Monoxide Alarms” toolkit public educators can use to conduct successful community education campaigns, includes safety tip sheets, easy-to-read handouts, talking points, news releases, a video, and public service announcements. In addition, the CO safety information page on the NFPA website provides facts and figures and reports about the dangers of CO exposure.

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“Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!” The 2015 Fire Prevention Week theme is a great reminder about smoke alarm safety and the importance of location. It’s also a message that never gets old.

In many communities, Fire Prevention Week doesn’t end in October, but continues in November and December and into the New Year. If you’re looking for “must haves,” banners, brochures, posters, and other items, now is the perfect time to make purchases. Many items are available at reduced prices.

LNTB in Spanish

NFPA's Learn Not to Burn® Preschool Program is available for download in English and Spanish. The behaviors and strategies addressed in the program are guided by research related to fire and life safety messaging and young children, including the use of positively framed messages, opportunities for active engagement, and encouragement of family involvement.

 

 Sparky the Fire Dog's ® new free trivia app, Sparky's Brain Busters, challenges students to work alone or team up with friends and classmates to answer questions on standards-aligned subjects like math, science, pop culture and fire safety. Give the wheel a spin and answer the trivia questions quickly. Earn all 5 character badges in two minutes to win!

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As I have mentioned in past posts, NFPA has been working with the folks at Martha Stewart Living to provide important fire safety tips for all of the projects and activities we do at home and with our families.

 

And now, we're excited to share our newest post with you! If you're like me, you probably can't even believe we're talking about Halloween (wasn't it just summer??) but it's just around the corner. So, you'll want to check out our latest "creepy crawl-y" Halloween fire safety tips on Martha's site. There are some great ideas for costumes, decorations and candles that are easy to implement in your own home and can really help keep your family, trick-or-treaters and others who visit your house over the next few weeks and on October 31, fire safe.

 

Find other great resources for Halloween fire safety on our updated Halloween webpage. You'll discover activities for kids and families, a video, tips sheet and much more.

 

Remember to stay fire safe this Halloween holiday, everyone, and have a fun and festive All Hallows Eve!

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Portions of Remembering When™: A Fire and Fall Prevention Program for Older Adults, are now available in large print. The Fire and Fall Prevention Brochure, a double-sided brochure ready-to-print on 8 ½” x 14” paper, and the Home Safety Checklist, which can be printed on 11”x 17” paper, can both be customized with your department or organization name and contact information.

Early next month, the 2015 Remembering When Scholarship Conference will get underway. Participants will receive training to reach older adults through group presentations and home visits during the November 4-6 conference in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d16798e1970c-500wi.jpgIn September, NFPA launched its newest wildfire safety campaign for youth called TakeAction. As part of the campaign, we focus on one of our favorite things in the world - our pets (check out our recent blogs about the campaign)!

 

Why are pets so important to the TakeAction campaign? Well, the truth of the matter is, when your family receives an evacuation notice, whether it's for wildfire or any other natural disaster, everything happens quickly - too quickly it seems - and often, we don't have time to gather all of the belongings we need to take with us and for our furry family members.

 

Just recently, Megan Blake, host of Pet Life Radio/A Super Smiley Adventure invited Cathy Prudhomme from our wildfire division to talk about TakeAction and the importance of pet preparedness and safety during a wildfire. We invite you to tune in and share it with members of your family and friends.

 

Cathy joined Washington's Brinnon Fire Chief, Patrick Nicholson, with his K9 partner, arson dog Allie, Florida State Fire Marshal’s Office Captain Ross Holt and his K9 arson dog, Ember, and our wonderful partner and sponsor of the TakeAction campaign, State Farm’s Public Affairs Specialist, Heather Paul. During the interview you'll hear from the experts and our host about their personal experiences with evacuation, and learn some great tips and advice you can use for your own pets as you prepare.

 

If you don't know about Pet Life Radio, it's the largest and #1 pet radio network on the planet, featuring weekly pet-related talk shows hosted by the most well-known pet experts, authors and radio and TV personalities in the world of animals and pets. With over six million monthly listeners Pet Life Radio has hosted celebrity guests like Jennifer Aniston, Owen Wilson, Betty White, Rachael Ray, Ryan O'Neal, and many more. Pet Life Radio just recently won a 2012 Genesis Award Honor (Humane Society of the United States), and is the official radio media sponsor of the 2013 and 2014 American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards (Read our announcement - Sparky the Fire Dog named Spokesdog for 2012 Hero Dog Awards)!

 

Check out Cathy's interview then go to our webpage and download the household pet and horse checklists and get started on building your pets' evacuation kit today! Find these checklists, videos, safety tips and more by visiting www.nfpa.org/takeaction.

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It’s fun having out-of-town guests. There’s the preparation to make sure they’ll feel welcomed, and the excitement as their arrival time approaches. We at NFPA are in this position on a regular basis, hosting visitors, not only from out-of-town, but from other countries.

In early October we opened our doors to visitors from the fire service in South Korea. The group, including an interpreter, spent part of an afternoon here at NFPA headquarters touring our library, meeting rooms, boardroom, and new conference center.

I gave a presentation on the educational programs and materials of the Public Education Division. Our guests were intrigued by our Remembering When program. They were curious as to how to get fire departments and home visitor agencies to collaborate on providing fire and fall safety education to older adults.

They asked all kinds of questions of NFPA Project Coordinator, International Operations, Stacey Van Zandt and NFPA Vice President, Field Operations, Donald Bliss during their visit and seemed thrilled as they walked through the building, as if they were touring the home of their favorite celebrity or dignitary. They told us that coming to NFPA was a highlight of their visit to the United States.

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This year’s FireShows™West Conference and Expo attracted more than 1,000 participants and many of them learned something they didn’t already know about NFPA. The NFPA booth at the expo last week was a popular destination for attendees. Public Education Division Regional Education Specialist Jeff Donahue was there, handing out samples of NFPA materials, and shepherding people through the Fire Prevention Week, Sparky® and Sparky School House sites. Booth visitors were encouraged to sign up for Safety Source, the Public Education Division newsletter.

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Polo Ridge Elementary School, in Charlotte, North Carolina, won first place in the Charlotte Fire Department's 25th Annual Bulletin Board Contest. According to the fire department, the first-place win included a surprise awards ceremony at the school last week, as well as a check for $3,000, a plaque, student and teacher prizes, and the opportunity to keep the traveling trophy for a year.

 

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7dd1d73970b-320wi.jpgDuring the awards celebration, students demonstrated how to get low and go under smoke, and divided into teams in a race to help firefighters put on their turnout gear.

 

Charlotte Fire Department and the Mecklenburg County Fire Marshal's Office sponsor the program, in which third grade students created a bulletin board focused on this year's Fire Prevention Week theme: Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm. Schools submitted a photo of their bulletin board and a two-minute video in which students explained how they created the entry and how it ties in with the theme.

 

This year, 30 schools participated and six took home prizes.

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Kidde Fire Safety in partnership with Home Depot has been hosting Operation Save a Life in cities across the United States to make sure that fire departments have smoke alarms for their outreach to families. This week, they stopped in NC and hosted an event that gave 4125 long life smoke alarms to fire departments in the central part of the state.  This was the 12th year of the program that has given over 50,000 alarms- just in NC alone.  With the UNC Burn Center, having nearly 1700 burn injuries admitted this year which is over 200 more than last year, there is a lot of work to prevent fire and burns left to do.

 

Ernest Grant, the Chairman of the NFPA Board of Directors, was part of the media event that raised awareness about the need for working smoke alarms.  NFPA and NC OSFM gave smoke alarm tip sheets and installation guides to participating fire departments to enhance their home visits.   This outreach program includes smoke alarm installations and fire safety public service announcements throughout the month of October. 

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Congratulations to fire departments, Kidde, Home Depot, and ABC11 for a successful event that helps save lives in the heart of Carolina. The next stop on the tour will be the Atlanta area in December.

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On Monday to kickoff Fire Prevention Week, NFPA hosted a pilot fire safety workshop for volunteer firefighters, fire marshals, and fire chiefs in the western part of NC.  This workshop was a great chance to learn about all the free resources that NFPA provides to enhance your efforts during Fire Prevention Week and beyond.  This exciting workshop included videos and lesson plans like the Chicago Fire of 1871 and the history of why we celebrate FPW.  I was excited to explore new ways to get education out to the folks that cannot attend classes during the day but volunteer their time to help their communities.  As you know: Firefighters are Community Helpers and when you need them Firefighters are on their way! Thank you for your commitment to fire safety day and night.

NFPA and Safe Kids Worldwide are officially teaming up to promote fire safety through the Safe Kids Worldwide network. This partnership presents a great opportunity 6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7daad99970b-320wi.jpgfor NFPA to expand its fire safety education outreach through Safe Kids Worldwide’s local coalitions - many of which include fire departments - and have an established track record for effectively communicating safety messages to children and families. In addition, a Safe Kids Worldwide representative will begin serving on NFPA’s Educational Messages Advisory Committee (EMAC).

 

To kick off the partnership, NFPA and Safe Kids Worldwide are working together to promote Fire Prevention Week.

 

We strongly encourage fire departments and fire safety educators to join forces with their local Safe Kids Worldwide coalition when and where possible. It’s a great way to make new connections with others doing similar work in your community, and who are likely eager to support your fire safety outreach efforts.

 

We’ll make sure to keep you posted on events and programs we’re jointly supporting in the months ahead. To learn more about how you can work in coordination with a local Safe Kids Worldwide coalition, contact Judy Comoletti, NFPA’s divisional manager for public education, at jcomoletti@nfpa.org.

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Sparky the Fire Dog® made the rounds at the recent Scarecrow Festival in Gig Harbor, Washington. The festival is an autumn celebration with live entertainment, farm animals, hay rides, camel and pony rides, and a scarecrow competition. Gig Harbor Fire & Medic One participated, providing tours of the fire engine and handing out Fire Prevention Week goodies.

Several years ago, my husband and I traveled through time without leaving our home.

 

We had  purchased a 120-year-old Victorian house, which had been converted into a triplex during the 1960’s. During the stages of demolition to turn it back into a single-family home, my husband and I took down ceiling tiles, old fixtures, and walls covered in dated wallpaper. As we uncovered each layer of the house, we watched history unfold.

 

But it wasn’t until we pulled up the flooring that I found a priceless artifact: a full-page newspaper spread on Fire Prevention Week from October 9th, 1939.  At the time of my discovery, I was a local fire and life safety public educator. I immediately sat down to look closely at the yellowed newsprint, which, remarkably, was in great condition, even though it had been under tiers of flooring for almost 75 years.

 

Amazingly, many of the messages were still right on target.

 

Fast forward to today. This newspaper spread has even more meaning to me during Fire Prevention Week now that I am  a full-time staff person for NFPA.  I am honored to carry on this mighty tradition, commemorating the Great Chicago Fire, and ever-steadily helping to increase education and reduce injuries related to fires.

We urge everyone to pause this week and think about the 2015 Fire Prevention Week theme: "Hear the Beep Where You Sleep! Every bedroom needs a working smoke alarm".  This is mark on history and our chance to make a difference.  Having working smoke alarms in all sleeping areas will save lives! 6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb087e4bc0970d-800wi.jpg
 

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Each October, The Home Depot runs a month-long fire safety campaign at all its stores (nearly 2,000 across the U.S.) to educate customers about ways to protect their homes and families from potential fire risks. As part of the effort, The Home Depot actively supports Fire Prevention Week by hosting a fire safety day in coordination with the local fire department. They also hold two in-store workshops - one involving a craft for kids and another that specifically targets adults.

 

These pictures taken at an event hosted by The Home Depot in Natick, MA, and the Natick Fire Department show how successful these events are, and how well the partnership works.

 

To find out details about fire safety day plans in your area, contact The Home Depot nearest you.

 

For more information about this year's campaign, "Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm", visit www.firepreventionweek.org.

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Fire department headquarters in Sparks, Nevada, was the place to be for the kickoff Saturday for Fire Prevention Week activities. A pancake breakfast was one of the highlights of the open house.

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There was plenty of educational material to go around with the department’s purchase of FPW in a Box. Sparks Fire Marshal Bob King is pictured below at right with Sparky the Fire Dog® and NFPA Public Education Regional Education Specialist Jeff Donahue.

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As you have heard recently through this blog, NFPA launched its TakeAction campaign aimed at youth who live in wildfire risk areas. (If you haven't, take a minute and check out my post from October 2 that explains the campaign, how it came to be, and offers a couple of great videos to watch, too!) The campaign was born out of the results of a number of workshops NFPA held a couple of years ago with teens and their parents who had experienced a wildfire, and we asked them to tell us their stories, their concerns, and their hopes. 

 

The second part of the TakeAction campaign focuses on one of the key messages the students shared with us in those workshops. It's one that we know will be near and dear to your hearts. Pets! I'm sure you can attest to this in your own homes: we treat our household pets and horses and other animals on our farms as members of our family. The students in the workshops told us that even more than material goods, they wanted to make sure their pets stayed safe during a wildfire evacuation, but they weren't sure how to do that.

 

I pose the same question to you. Do you know what happens when you're called to evacuate in an emergency? Has your family prepared your pets for an evacuation like you have prepared every human member in your home? For those of us living in a wildfire risk area, we know that once we get the call to evacuate, we need to move as quickly as possible. Being familiar with what happens in an evacuation, knowing how and when to leave, and building a kit for each animal increases the likelihood that all family members will leave safely and together long before a fire reaches their property.

 

So where do you start? NFPA has developed a fun video created for teens and families to share with friends on social media as a way to encourage everyone to get involved. Take a moment to watch it with your family and talk about what you've learned.

 

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After you watch the video, take a look at our great resources. We've got a checklist for horses and one for household pets that you can download and help you get started on creating that evacuation kit for each pet in your family. We even include a number of great tips and resources that'll help you prepare all year long.

 

Evacuations are never easy, and it's especially unsettling when we know our pets and horses and other farm animals are also in danger. But there's something you can do to help make the situation easier, and give you greater piece of mind. Take advantage of the resources our TakeAction campaign has to offer. Start building your pet evacuation kits today so tomorrow, when a wildfire threatens your area, you'll be ready when your family gets the call to leave.

 

Find the video and all of our resources on www.nfpa.org/takeaction. For more pet preparedness tips, check out our pet safety tips sheet, available to download now on NFPA's safety information webpage.

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The President of the United States has proclaimed October 4 through October 10, 2015, as Fire Prevention Week. On Sunday, October 4, the United States flag was flown at half staff at all federal office buildings in honor of the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service. President Barack Obama is calling on all Americans to participate in Fire Prevention Week with appropriate programs and activities.

 

President Obama paid tribute Sunday to firefighters who died in the line of duty and cited the sacrifices they made in service to a grateful nation.

Obama spoke at the annual national memorial service in Emmitsburg, Maryland, and said those being remembered were heroes.

Obama said, “It’s hard to think of a more selfless profession.” He added that it’s hard to imagine what it takes to “override the natural human instinct for self-preservation and run into danger as others are running away — to literally walk through fire, knowing you might never make it out.”

Read the full Presidential Proclamation issued by the White House.

Now that Fire Prevention Week is officially here, we’re launching the fourth and final “Smoke Alarm Smarts” video, where Sparky the Fire Dog® asks people to name three places smoke alarms should be installed in the home.

While this year's campaign theme, “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm”, promotes that you need a smoke alarm in every bedroom, this clearly isn’t common knowledge to many people. So please share this video wherever you can (Facebook, email, websites, etc.) and help spread the word!

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb087c89a4970d-800wi.jpgFor many of us, when we leave the office on a Friday afternoon we can’t wait to put our work behind us, but for one NFPA employee, her work was in front of her and she couldn’t have been more pleased.

Barbara Dunn was driving on highway U.S 1 in Walpole, Massachusetts, when she saw a billboard for this year’sFire Prevention Week campaign. This year’s theme, Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm, is displayed in giant letters along with an image of Sparky the Fire Dog®

Barbara was able to make her way down the road filled with pride for being part of the NFPA family, and countless motorists got to focus—at least momentarily—on the importance of having working smoke alarms where they sleep.

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Today is a big day. Fire Prevention Week kicks off, and will continue all the way through Saturday the 10th!

 

Did you know that roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are asleep?

 

Smoke alarms save lives. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. In fact, having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half! That's why, this year's Fire Prevention Week theme aims to keep your family safe with working smoke alarms in every bedroom. The official theme is "Hear the Beep where you Sleep. Every bedroom needs a working smoke alarm."

 

We hope everyone will install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area, and on every level of your home, including the basement. Larger homes may need more alarms.

 

NFPA is excited to share this important information so everyone better understands the life-saving value of home smoke alarms. Visit NFPA's "Smoke Alarm Central" and Fire Prevention Week website for more information, resources, messages, videos and a fun, interactive quiz to test your knowledge.

 

Also, be sure to join the conversation on social media using #FirePreventionWeek.

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If you haven't heard, NFPA recently launched a new campaign for teens called TakeAction, and it's proving to be a great resource for students and families across the country.

 

Specifically, the campaign targets middle and high school students living in areas with wildfire risks. Research shows that youth are a valuable resource in bringing information into their homes and being active participants in projects related to risk reduction. So, a few years ago, members of our wildland fire operations division organized a handful of workshops around the country and met with teens and their parents who had lived through a wildfire in their area, and asked them about their experience.

 

The students were honest and very forthcoming with their answers, telling us that 1) they didn't know a whole lot about wildfire and its effects, and 2) they wanted to do more to raise awareness about wildfires, take some action to help friends, neighbors and their own families prepare ahead of a threat in their area, but didn't know how.

We took their answers and feedback to heart and TakeAction was born. We created a short video that explains what wildfire is, how it affects communities like the one you live in, and how teens and families can get involved in the campaign. The video can be shared easily through social media and in online newsletters. If you are one of the millions who live in a wildfire risk area, watch it together with the young people you love. Take the opportunity to discuss what you can do as a family to help stay safer from wildfire, then have everyone share it with friends and neighbors.

 

As parents, we know our kids have to get involved in community service projects for school, right? Participating in school and club community service projects directly benefit the people, wildlife and neighborhoods where you live, and wildfire mitigation can be and is a part of that equation.

So, as part of the TakeAction campaign, NFPA and State Farm created a great way to reward teens who want to get involved in wildfire risk reduction projects. It's called Wildfire Risk Reduction Community Service Projects/Funding Awards.

 

By taking part in proactive service projects, students not only make important contributions in their area to reduce wildfire risks and mitigate post-fire impacts like flooding and mudslides, but they can earn $500 towards an educational scholarship or donate the money to a charitable organization of his/her choice! Talk to your kids about it, then watch this great video below that explains how they can get involved.

 

This year's wildfire season has proven to be one of the worst in many years. Why not take advantage of this campaign to involve family members in projects that can help you build a safer place to live. TakeAction has a number of great resources you can use to help you get started and guide you along the way like checklists and project ideas and other resources. Get inspired by the stories from other communities, just like yours, that have made it a point to take steps now to prepare.

 

When you get a chance, share your stories with us. If your kids have been involved in wildfire mitigation projects, we want to hear about it! Let your stories be the inspiration and encouragement others need to begin working on their piece of the bigger wildfire puzzle. We can't wait to find out what everyone is doing!

 

Learn more about the TakeAction campaign and the community service project funding awards by visiting www.nfpa.org/takeaction. And stay tuned for the second part of our campaign that focuses on pet preparedness! We know you'll love it!

 

Find the full report on youth and wildfire on our "youth and families" webpage on NFPA.org.

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Imagine zipping around town in a car that makes a statement. That’s what members of Whitby Fire and Emergency Services in Ontario get to do with their new fire safety vehicle. Just in time for Fire Prevention Week, OWASCO car dealership donated the 2015 Volkswagen Beetle all decked out in fire safety messaging featuring Sparky the Fire Dog®

 

Whitby Mayor Don Mitchell (right) was on hand for the ribbon cutting. The vehicle will be featured at community education displays at two Home Depot locations, a presentation at the Whitby Seniors’ Activity Centre, story time with Fire Chief Dave Speed at the Brooklin Branch Library, and an open house at fire department headquarters.

Proclamation signed

The mayor of Westminster, Colorado, has declared October Fire Prevention Month in the city. Mayor Herb Atchison's signed proclamation was presented at a recent city council meeting. Westminster Fire Department Public Education Officer Sherrie Leeka is pictured above holding the proclamation, flanked by City Councilor Emma Pinter and Westminster Fire Department Deputy Chief Derik Minard.

Fire Prevention Week 2015 (2)

In a ceremony in the state capitol in Topeka, Kansas, Governor Sam Brownback signed a proclamation last week recognizing Fire Prevention Week in the state. He was surrounded by city and fire officials, as well as other leaders in the community.

In addition, Oregon Governor Kate Brown, in support of Fire Prevention Week, has proclaimed October as Oregon Fire Prevention Month. Chief Deputy State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple and State Fire Marshal Jim Walker (below) proudly displayed the proclamation. During October, the Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal, the American Red Cross, Bi-Mart, the Oregon Food Bank, and fire agencies statewide are teaming up to raise awareness of the importance of having working smoke alarms in the areas where you sleep.

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NFPA’s media materials for Fire Prevention Week include sample gubernatorial and mayoral proclamations. These can be used to spotlight the fire safety work of first responders in your city, state, or province, and help reinforce the lifesaving messages associated with this year’s theme: “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm.” A proclamation-signing ceremony can be a great photo opportunity for the media, and valuable exposure for a fire department.

For those planning to purchase FPW materials, now is a great time to do so with Fire Prevention Week only a few days away.

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