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2015

TreeWith the holiday now behind us, O Christmas tree, how saggy are your branches? The gifts have been removed from under the pine, the tree is swiftly losing its coat of green, and the needles are piling up on the floor, which means it’s time to remove the tree from your home.

Christmas trees are very flammable, dry out the longer they remain in the home, and can be consumed by fire in a matter of seconds.” All trees can burn, though dry ones can be engulfed by flames significantly more quickly.

NFPA statistics indicate that nearly 40 percent of home fires that begin with Christmas trees occur in January. Although these fires are not common, they are much more likely to be serious when they do occur. On average, one of every 31 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death. Compare that to an average of one death per 144 total reported home structure fires.

Christmas trees are decorations, and people may want to continue the festive spirit and leave up their ever-drying pines long after the last of the gifts have been opened. It’s good to remember, however, that the longer the tree remains in the home, the greater the fire risk becomes.

We hope that by educating people about the extreme fire hazards, people will be prompted to remove their trees in a timely manner, giving their families the gift of fire safety as the season winds down!

If available, NFPA recommends using the local community’s recycling program for tree disposal. Trees should not be put in the garage or left outside.

NFPA also offers tips on removing lighting and decorations from trees to ensure they are taken down safely this year and in the right condition for Christmas 2016:

  • Use the gripping area on the plug when unplugging electrical decorations. Never pull the cord to unplug any device from an electrical outlet, as this can harm the wire and insulation of the cord, increasing the risk for shock or electrical fire.
  • As you pack up light strings, inspect each line for damage, throwing out any sets that have loose connections, broken sockets or cracked or bare wires.
  • Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags, or wrap them around a piece of cardboard.
  • Store electrical decorations in a dry place away from children and pets where they will not be damaged by water or dampness.

For additional resources and information for a fire-safe winter season, visit “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires.” 

Hover board fire

The rash of recent fires sparked from hover boards in the U.S. reminded me of the importance of being vigilant with checking products for the stamp of an independent testing laboratory.  As international markets have become stunningly efficient at taking blue prints to retail shelves in record time, U.S. shoppers have grown accustomed to easy on-line access to knock-off products that can be offered at an attractive lower price point, however many of these products are lesser quality and not built to the same safety standards as in the U.S.  This is exactly the case with the thousands, if not millions, of trendy hoverboards that have been purchased this year for the holidays.  Reports of hoverboards bursting into flames have caused numerous fires, including devastating home fires in Louisiana and Alabama. 

I spoke with Ken Willette, Division Manager for Public Fire Protection at NFPA, on the Christal Frost radio show about the dangers of these hoverboards.  Ken pointed out the specific risks associated with inferior lithium ion batteries and internal components.  And just as the huge on-line retailer Amazon has recently demanded, Ken urged consumers to take care to look for that seal from an independent testing laboratory when purchasing a hoverboard from any site.  And for those consumers who have already purchased a product, we covered the NFPA safety tips to help prevent future fires and injuries that may lurk with some of these hoverboard devices.

Whether it’s a hoverboard or any electronic or electric product, it pays to utilize the expertise of an independent testing laboratory to help navigate the complexities across the supply chain from compliance to regulatory issues.  While the holidays may be the season of peace, it’s always the season for peace of mind.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08a25631970d-320wi|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08a25631970d-320wi|alt=Winter Holiday Tips Sheet|style=margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;|title=Winter Holiday Tips Sheet|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb08a25631970d img-responsive!After firefighters in a Massachusetts town responded to a fire last week blamed on an overloaded and improper extension cord, the chief is urging the community to celebrate safely by using precautions when decorating their homes.


 

“The holidays are a festive and wonderful time of year where we come together to celebrate,” Groveland Fire Chief Robert Lay is quoted as saying in the Georgetown Record . “This means using properly rated electrical wires and outlets and using best safety practices when putting together annual big holiday meals.”


Firefighters responded after a passing motorist noticed a fire burning in the bushes of a home. The passerby ran up to the house and unplugged the Christmas decorations, and the fire was quickly put out with no damage to the home.


 

NFPA’s Project Holiday offers a wealth of safety information to ensure that the holiday season is a safe one, including the Winter Holiday safety tips sheet and the Christmas Tree tips sheet.


 

Smoke Alarm Central is a complete source for smoke alarm information.


!http://i.zemanta.com/316526911_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/316526911_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Christmas trees are a potential fire hazard; follow simple tips for safely having one in your home

!http://i.zemanta.com/342594628_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/342594628_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Extension cord fire leaves two dead

!http://i.zemanta.com/316965277_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/316965277_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA decorates Christmas tree for safety

 


 

Officials with the North Shore Fire Department, Bayside, Wisconsin, say expectations were exceeded with the Prevent, Prepare, and React initiative, funded by NFPA’s Rolf H. Jensen Memorial Public Education Grant. The major goals of the program were to ensure that residents over 65 had working smoke alarms on every level of the home and that they understood escape planning.


The objective, to complete 125 home assessments between early January and mid-December, was exceeded. The department conducted 160 home assessments and installed 258 smoke alarms. Additional partnerships have been formed that will allow the program to continue into 2016 and beyond.


 

Recently, the Prevent, Prepare, and React program received news coverage from WTMJ-TV in Milwaukee.


 

The next deadline for grant applications is February 5, 2016.


!http://i.zemanta.com/353886254_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/353886254_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Practice makes a difference when fire strikes home of fire safety educator

Eight-year-old Isaija Hodge helped his 86-year-old great grandmother and four-year-old Chihuahua safely escape a home fire this week, thanks to working smoke alarms and fire safety lessons he learned at school.

Isaija grandmother and dog

In October, smoke alarms were installed in the home by the Covington, VA, Fire Department and Rescue Squad in coordination with the American Red Cross’ smoke alarm installation program. Around the same time, Isaija and his classmates were visited by Sparky the Fire Dog and the fire department, who taught fire safety lessons to students, including how to call 911 and get outside safely.

Isaija was clearly paying attention: When he heard a crash in the front of the house, he went to see what happened and saw flames and smoke coming from the porch. Then the smoke alarms began to sound. Isaija found his great-grandmother and dog, grabbed a cellphone on their way out and dialed 911.

“The prevention part is the key to any fire department,” said Kevin Pettitt, fire chief of the Covington Fire Department and Rescue Squad, who spearheaded the school visits and the smoke alarm installation program. “Education of kids is critical.”

Sadly, a series of deadly fires in Worcester, MA, this year, including one that occurred earlier this week, reinforces the consequences of not having basic fire safety measures like working smoke alarms in place.

Deputy Chief John Sullivan of the Worcester Fire Department noted that they’re doing all they can to remind residents about the extreme importance of working smoke alarms. “It is frustrating when we have these cases of no working smoke detectors or, in this case, none at all,” said Deputy Chief Sullivan. “We’re trying to do everything we know within budget constraints to get that message out.”

Photo courtesy of Amy Friedenberger/The Roanoke Times

Dec SSThe December issue of Safety Source, NFPA's public education enewsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find;

  • NFPA’s annual holiday fire-safety campaign, “Project Holiday” 
  • New Dan Doofus video, Yule Light Up My Life
  • Live burn video shows how quickly Christmas tree fires can turn deadly
  • Deck the Halls with Fire Safety video 
  • The James M. Shannon Advocacy Medal

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division, activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog® and more.

 

!http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d183dc1f970c-800wi|border=0|src=http://nfpa.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d183dc1f970c-800wi|alt=Projectholiday14banner|title=Projectholiday14banner|class=asset asset-image at-xid-6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d183dc1f970c image-full img-responsive!


Many of us are busy these days decorating our homes for the holidays, choosing favorite recipes for lunches and dinners, and tidying up. As we prepare to make family and friends comfortable when they visit, let’s keep their safety in mind too.


 

It’s not only important to test smoke alarms every month, but to tell guests about your home fire escape plan. While you’re at it, you can practice your home fire drill with your overnight guests.


Make sure children stay away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay at least three feet away. Kids should also stay away from hot food and liquids.


 

More tips for this holiday season are available at Project Holiday , NFPA’s winter holiday safety page, which offers an abundance of safety information to ensure that the holiday season is a safe one.


!http://i.zemanta.com/329729786_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/329729786_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Two recent home fire incidents underscore the life-saving power of working smoke alarms

!http://i.zemanta.com/345501370_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/345501370_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!NFPA announces "Hear the Beep Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm" as the official theme for Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, 2015

!http://i.zemanta.com/noimg_25_80_80.jpg|src=http://i.zemanta.com/noimg_25_80_80.jpg|alt=|style=margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; width: 80px; display: block; max-width: 100%;!Dan Doofus reminds us to replace old smoke alarms in new video

Your cat lets you know he’s delighted you’ve finally bought some great toys!

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Keep pets and children at least three feet away from burning candles and electrical cords to prevent burns and electrical fires.

 

That ever-growing pile of fallen pine needles on the living room floor is receiving more comments than the decorations for your Christmas tree.

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A dry tree in your home is a fire danger. Think of it as a huge pile of kindling in your home. Choose a tree with fresh, green needles that do not fall off when touched.

 

You’ve spent more time trying to free yourself out of the tangled lights than actually decorating the tree.

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Check the manufacturer’s instructions to find out how many lights can be connected to prevent electric shock and fire.

 

You know it’s bad to put flammable material near a fire, but you can’t help yourself. These stockings just look so darn cute and festive!

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Keep anything that can burn away from a heat source, despite how awesome it looks. Flameless candles are also a great alternative to real ones when decorating.

 

Your house is a holiday tourist attraction and you couldn’t be prouder.

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An overloaded electrical outlet is a major fire hazard. Plug strings of lights directly into the wall and keep the number to a minimum.

 

Some of the bulbs on your string of lights have already taken time off for the holidays.

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Replace any string of lights that has worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. These can easily start a fire.

 

You’ve remembered to keep yourself well hydrated, but the same can’t be said for your Christmas tree.

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Always keep water in the tree stand. Check daily and add water as needed. Dried-out trees are a major fire hazard.

 

You’re convinced those strings of Christmas lights make the perfect hat to complement your holiday outfit.

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Some lights are only for indoor or outdoor use, but not both. And most certainly, not for your head.

 

You’ve been a bit lazy about taking down your Christmas tree so you got creative and came up with a new tradition: a Valentine’s Day tree!

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Dried-out trees are a fire danger and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside against the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program.

 

Let’s face it, the holidays are never perfect, no matter how they’re portrayed in magazines and on television. But by following a few simple practices and precautions, you can create a perfectly fire-safe holiday for you and your loved ones!

And remember, have working smoke alarms in your home and create a home escape plan. Practice it with your family so everyone knows what to do if a fire does occur.

Happy Holidays from NFPA!

 

NFPA's lovable Dan Doofus is back in a new video, "Yule Light Up My Life," to remind us how to have a fire-safe holiday with just a few simple steps. The Dan Doofus series is intended to convey a safety message in a light-hearted, entertaining way. It is not intended for children. To learn more about what you can do to keep your home safe this holiday season, visit Project Holiday.

The devastating damage Christmas tree fires can inflict on people and property – and just how quickly it can happen - were vividly demonstrated during a live burn event on Monday at the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) research lab in Rockville, MD. The footage (above) underscores just how fast a dried out Christmas tree burns, with flashover occurring in about 30 seconds, while a well-watered tree burns at a far slower rate.

 

National news outlets covered the event, including The Today Show, CNN, FOX News, NBC, Univision and ABC News. Watch the ABC News featuring NFPA President Jim Pauley, who addressed the potential risks posed by Christmas tree and candle fires, while reminding everyone about the life-saving value of working smoke alarms in the home and a having a home fire escape plan.

 

Of course, the goal of the burn event isn't to scare people away from enjoying the holidays. It's to remind everyone about the importance of taking simple safety precautions that can ensure a festive and fire-safe season.

 

For a wealth of information, videos, tip sheets and other resources addressing the safe use of Christmas trees, candles and other holiday decorations, visit www.nfpa.org/winterholidaysafety.

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01bb089bcff3970d-320wi.pngA little girl in New York state with burns over 75 percent of her body has only one wish for Christmas this year–enough cards to fill her aunt's card tree.

 

According to WGN-TV, two years ago, Safyre Terry's father and three younger siblings were killed in a fire caused by arson. She was found next to her father, who used his body to shield her from the flames.

 

In addition to suffering from severe burns, Safyre lost her right hand three months after the fire, and also lost her left foot. She has had dozens of surgeries and her next one is scheduled for January 5.

 

Safrye’s paternal aunt, Liz Dodler, who has sole custody of her, said that she bought a tree to hang Christmas cards on this year, and Safyre instantly got excited and said she couldn’t wait to fill it up. “Honey, that’s probably not gonna happen,” Dodler said she responded. “We maybe get 10 cards a year, and the card tree holds 100.”

So Dodler decided to do something. She posted a request for cards on Facebook. Social media is responding. Cards have started coming in.

 

Christmas cards for Safyre can be sent to P.O. Box 6126 Schenectady, NY 12306, USA

The holiday wish for Barrie Fire and Emergency Service of Ontario is for all residents to have a merry, bright and safe holiday season. In cooperation with Rogers TV a new holiday video has been created to show you how to minimize the risks of fire and keep your family safe this year.  The video takes a creative spin on ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas, giving the holiday standard a fire prevention focus. Listen to Barrie Fire Chief John Lynn’s advice on what to do to keep your family safe.

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The Toronto Fire Services officially launched Ontario’s 4th annual “12 Days of Holiday Fire Safety” campaign today with its largest-ever public assembly of fire inspectors at the Scarborough Town Centre  in Toronto. The 101 Fire Inspectors joined Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services, Yasir Naqvi (right), Toronto Fire Chief Jim Sales and Ontario Fire Marshal Ross Nichols to kick off the province-wide program by giving away 1,010 gift bags containing Kidde smoke alarms and other holiday education and safety items.

 

The safety entourage, which included Sparky the Fire Dog®, fanned out in the mall with gift bags. “This is a very special time of year when families and friends come together to celebrate the holiday season,” Minister Yasir Naqvi said. “The 12 Days of Holiday Fire Safety outlines some easy steps we can all take to ensure a festive, joyful, and safe holiday season.”

 

“We believe having such a large group of uniformed officers in one place sends a strong message on the need for extra vigilance over the holidays,” said Ross Nichols, Ontario’s Fire Marshal. “Holiday festivities can quickly turn tragic due to things like unattended cooking, careless smoking, faulty decorative lighting, the increased use of heating equipment, and smoke or CO alarms that have expired or have been tampered with,” he adds.

 

Forty-three other local fire departments are participating as well. Fire departments will work with their local media to announce a fire safety tip every day for 12 days leading up to Christmas. Listeners can phone in at a designated time. The first ones with the correct message of the day will win one of the gift bags as well. The campaign is expected to provide outreach to hundreds of thousands of Ontario residents.

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7f72e94970b-320wi.jpgLt. Annmarie Pickett, public education officer for the Worcester Fire Department in Worcester,  Massachusetts, and the 2015 NFPA Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Yearcan describe the months since she was chosen for the award in one word–surreal.

“The 400 members within our department now know all of our hard work and efforts,” she said. “The support of this division from the very top down has been amazing. I am often stopped by my peers, told congratulations, and they inquire as to what they can do to help our efforts.”

Lt. Pickett is known for her commitment to bringing fire and life safety messages to as many people as possible.

The city of Worcester gave her a key to the city and produced a congratulatory video, which served as a sendoff for her trip to Chicago in June to the NFPA Conference to receive the award. The Educator of the Year receives a $1,000 honorarium, travel to NFPA Conference for the award presentation, and conference registration. The local fire department receives a $1,000 donation to support public education activities.

“With the award money I was able to purchase two awesome table drapes with our logo embroidered. I can’t even begin to express my gratitude,” she said.

She encourages fire and life safety educators to consider applying for the award. Applicants can be nominated or self-nominated. The deadline for applications is February 12, 2016.

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Let this be your formal invitation! We are hosting a Twitter chat, tomorrow (December 9th) at 2:00pm ET along with our friends U.S. Fire Administration, Electrical Safety Foundation International, SafeKids and Consumer Product Safety Commission (plus, many other safety groups around the country!) We will be talking about all sorts of winter fire safety issues and providing tips and resources to make sure you and your family 'put a freeze on winter fires' this year.

 

Follow along with the chat using #WinterSafety on Twitter. Feel free to submit your own questions related to fire safety topics as well. We hope to see you there!

 

When you’re decking the halls this year, make sure to keep fire safety in mind. That’s the main message behind "Project Holiday," NFPA's annual holiday fire safety campaign, which works to educate the public about the increased risk of home fires during the holiday season.

 

Holiday decorations, Christmas trees, candles and cooking all contribute to an increased number of home fires during December, making it one of the four leading months for U.S. home fires. Consider these facts:

 

Holiday cooking: On Christmas Day in 2013, there was a 58 percent increase in the number of home cooking fires than on a typical day, and a 54 percent increase on Christmas Eve.

Christmas trees: Christmas tree fires aren't common, but when they do occur, they’re much more likely to be deadly than most other fires. One of every 31 reported home Christmas tree fires results in a death each year, compared to an annual average of one death per 144 total reported home fires.

Candles: December is the peak time of year for home candle fires; the top four days for home candle fires are New Year’s Day, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and Christmas Eve. In December, 11 percent of home candle fires began with decorations, compared to 4 percent the rest of the year.

Holiday decorations: Between 2009 and 2013, U.S. fire departments responded to an annual average of 860 home fires that began with decorations (excluding Christmas trees). These fires caused an annual average of one civilian death, 41 injuries and $13.4 million in direct property damage.

 

Don’t let these numbers turn you all Bah Humbug! “Project Holiday” provides a wealth of simple fire safety tips, recommendations and other resources to help everyone enjoy a safeand festive holiday season.  The campaign also provides tools and resources for local fire departments to promote the campaign in their communities. Make sure to check it all out!

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b7c7f4d52f970b-120wi.jpgTraditional and social media played a big role in the success of this years’ “Keeping Our Kids Safe–School Outreach Program,” in whichNFPA’s Learn Not to Burn® program was prominently featured. Sponsored by the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council and the Council of Canadian Fire Marshals and Fire Commissioners in partnership with Scholastic Canada, the campaign encourages families to develop and practice a home fire escape plan and adopt other fire safety measures.

Scholastic Canada shipped lesson plans to 60,000 classroom teachers throughout Canada to coincide with Fire Prevention Week 2015. Nearly 1,000 registered for a drawing to win prizes, including a fire safety pizza party, educational DVD’s, and Sparky the Fire Dog® dolls. In addition, the teachers committed to teaching LNTB Preschool, Kindergarten, or Grade 1.

More than 500 residents and teachers followed, re-tweeted, or issued original tweets about the campaign; PSA’s were aired by more than 125 radio stations in eight provinces and the Safe at Home Canada website received 7,128 visitors and 61,683 page views during the campaign period.

Fire officials received a number of comments from teachers about the LNTB program:

  • “The lessons are easy to use and very valuable.  Thanks!” - Wheatley, Ontario (Grade 3)
  • “A wonderful resource which is laid out and easy to follow.  It's great for the students and they can relate to the lessons easily.” - Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta (Grade 1)
  • “Learn Not to Burn is a fantastic program. It offers many teaching resources and children enjoy it and learn from it.” - Blackville, New Brunswick (Grade 2)

“This campaign is very rewarding,” says NFPA Public Education Field Advisor Art Pullan. “It gives the fire departments the resources they need to work collaboratively with educators. It’s an amazing show of support from Scholastic Canada and NFPA.”

6a00d8351b9f3453ef01b8d17e0ed5970c-320wi.jpgThe Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council, in partnership with the Toronto Fire Service, is launching the “12 Days of Holiday Safety” next week. The campaign kicks off at Scarborough Town Centre in Toronto. One hundred one fire inspectors and public educators from Toronto are scheduled to attend and will pick up gift bags, which include Sparky the Fire Dog® dolls, Sparky ornaments, and smoke alarms designed to remain effective for up to 10 years.

Forty-three other local fire departments are participating as well. Fire departments will work with their local media to announce a fire safety tip every day for 12 days leading up to Christmas. Listeners can phone in at a designated time. The first ones with the correct message of the day will win one of the gift bags. The campaign is expected to provide outreach to hundreds of thousands of Ontario residents.

The safety tips include watering Christmas trees daily, making sure to have working smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms, escape planning, candle safety, heating precautions, and electrical, and smoking safety.

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How prepared are you for the holidays? For what Mother Nature will most likely throw at us this winter? Not so sure? Then you won't want to miss FEMA's upcoming free webinar, "'Tis the Season:  Preparing for a Winter Storm and the Holidays" on Thursday, December 10 from 2:00 - 3:00 PM (EST).

During the webinar, you'll meet Matthew Lyttle from the FEMA Individual and Community Preparedness Division, who will discuss America’s PrepareAthon! and ways to prepare for a winter storm. You'll also get a chance to hear from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service, who will present on the winter seasonal outlook, El Niño, the Winter Weather Safety Campaign and driving safety. NFPA's own Judy Comoletti will also provide some great information on holiday safety and the risk of Christmas tree and cooking fires, and Sandy Facinoli from the FEMA U.S. Fire Administration, will present on holiday safety, the risk of electrical and candle fires, the danger of New Year’s fireworks, and heating safety. The hour-long webinar promises to be a fun and informative one. Won't you join us?

 

Register today! 

 

If you need help, feel free to reach out to FEMA's Zola Shaw at ishaw@teracore.com. She'll be happy to help!

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