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2017

Children reaching up to touch Sparky

Sparky the Fire Dog® will be making a whirlwind tour of Hanscom Air Force Base the week of Fire Prevention Week as he shares this year’s theme: “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!” He’s got something planned just about every day of the observance with the help of the fire prevention team on base as well as personnel of Engine 4 and Engine 6.

Sparky is no stranger to the air base community. Pictured above in this photo from Fire Prevention Week 2016, he is greeting children outside of the Child Development Center.

For communities looking to launch a Fire Prevention Week program or event, Fire Prevention Week in a Box™ Value Pack provides everything you’ll need to make FPW a success.

Pencil and crayon drawing of people fleeing a house fire

A poster contest is one of many ways to raise awareness about fire prevention among young audiences. Local and state public and fire and life safety organizations in Nevada recently kicked off a poster contest celebrating Fire Prevention Week October 8-14 and this year’s theme. “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!™

Winners were announced this week by State Fire Marshal Bart Chambers. “This year’s theme really stressed that seconds count in a fire. I would like to commend all of the students who made submissions detailing the urgency of being prepared,” he said.

This year’s winners include:

  • Angelina Valdez, Hafen Elementary School in Pahrump.
  • Chase Carpenter, DePoali Middle School in Reno.
  • Ashley Figuera, Carson High School in Carson City. (Poster is pictured above)

This year’s annual fire safety poster contest was sponsored by the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Nevada Department of Education, Fire Prevention Association of Nevada, and statewide local fire departments and the State Fire Marshal Division.

The Teaching Fire Prevention Week section of the NFPA website offers additional suggestions for presenting the FPW message to students, as well as ideas for addressing members of the community, and high-risk populations.

Sparky surrounded by a lot of kids on a playground

Sparky the Fire Dog® was the center of attention at the recent Fire Prevention Week event at Albion-Hetherington, a community housing area in Ottawa. Sparky got some help from Ottawa Fire Services in presenting activities and educational materials to the kids, focusing on this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!™.

The Fire Prevention Week section of the NFPA website includes a number of ideas for promoting the campaign in your community, including school visits, open houses, and fundraisers.

Colorful illustration of people planning for an emergency under the words, "Talk to Your Neighbor

During this final week of National Preparedness Month the public is encouraged to do its part to get campus, Photo of college campus building followed by Safety tipsbusiness, faith-based organizations and community organizations prepared for an emergency. FEMA provides tools for developing a preparedness program for businesses to plan for and reduce the impact of disasters, tools to make sure schools have emergency procedures in place for disasters that could affect campuses, and suggested steps to protect houses of worship. NFPA has joined forces with FEMA for National Preparedness Month and has a number of resources communities can use with this week’s theme in mind.

Campus and dorm fires information:

  • graphics
  • handouts
  • fire statistics
  • information on safety awareness campaigns
  • educational videos

Safety tip sheets on these topics:

  • campus fire safety
  • safety in places of public assembly
  • religious candles

The fact sheets in NFPA’s toolkit, “Get Ready: Preparing Your Community for a Disaster,” help with preparation for varied types if disasters.

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing. During this last week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we’re focusing on the importance of keeping stairwells clear for emergency evacuations.

 

For anyone who has lived in dorm room or off campus apartment, you know the rooms are small there is never enough space to store your belongings. But that doesn’t mean the hallway should act as a substitute closet. Keeping exit doors and the stairs clear of “stuff” allows students to make a fast escape in case of a fire.

 

The short video below features a local college student who provides this and a few other tips that point out the importance of keeping stairwells clear for emergencies.

 

 

If you’re a fire safety educator, a professional responsible for student safety on campus, or a parent, take a couple of seconds to review the video and share it with your student(s) on social media, online or in a face-face meeting. 

 

Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists, tip sheets you can share at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

Fire Prevention Week message on electronic social media card

NFPA simplifies the process of sharing this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out™ through social media. A set of ready-to-use social media cards can be posted on Facebook to promote this year’s home escape planning and practice messages. Or they can be used however you want to support your FPW efforts.

Just “right click” and download.

Coloring sheet with NFPA logo at the center and the words: Plan 2 Ways Out of Every Room

Coloring isn’t just for the kids anymore. It’s for the kids and adults. The first commercially successful adult coloring books came on the scene in 2012-2013. Their popularity has grown ever since. People color to de-stress, to self-express, to relax their minds. They’re forming coloring clubs and meeting in libraries, bookstores, and yoga centers. They come armed with expensive pencils, fine line markers, designer crayons, and sometimes a glass of wine.

Now they can shade, highlight, blend, and daringly scribble while learning about fire safety. The NFPA Coloring Sheet, “Plan 2 Ways Out of Every Room," features a key component of this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme. The sheet can be used as a stand-alone activity or paired with all kinds of neat items for all ages from Fire Prevention Week in a Box.

An illustration of a little girl in a plaid skirtPenelope is perfect in just about every way. Her room is spotless, her clothes match, she has perfectly pretty hair, and I promise that if you peak at her plate–politely of course–you’ll plainly see that she’s done the proper thing and eaten all of her peas. But one day, Penelope discovered that her perfect world wasn’t so perfect after all. Kids will love to hear the story of Perfect Penelope, and  the turning point in her life, while picking up important home fire escape planning tips.

For Fire Prevention Week and presentations throughout the year, The Perfect Penelope story can be paired with Sparky’s Stuff-to-Do Booklet, which is packed with fun activities and fire safety messaging. Kids will be entertained for hours.

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing. During this third week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we’re focusing on the dangers of overloading extension cords, power strips and outlets.

 

When it comes to college housing, there’s usually more than one person sharing the space and that means LOTS of computers, cell phones, iPads, appliances, lamps (need I keep going?) that need to be on and charged on a daily basis.

 

When you put too many plugs into an extension cord and load up an outlet, it’s important to remember you’re overloading the circuit, which in turns heats up and catches fire. The short video below features a local student who provides this and a few other tips that point out the correct way to use a power strip and outlet.

 

 

If you’re a fire safety educator, a professional responsible for student safety on campus, or a parent, take a couple of seconds to review the video and share it with your student(s) on social media, online or in a face-face meeting. 

 

Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists and our  student-to-student tip sheet at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

Lesson plan sheet for natural disasters from the "Get Ready" kit

Many people have experienced the challenges of rebuilding their lives after a disaster or other emergency. In stressful times like these, having access to personal financial, insurance, and medical records is crucial for beginning the process of recovering. During this third week of National Preparedness Month the theme is “Practice and Build out Your Plans.” NFPA has joined forces with FEMA for National Preparedness Month and has a number of resources communities can use along with FEMA materials with this week’s theme in mind.

The Natural Disasters page of the NFPA website offers general preparedness tips and a listing of agency resources. NFPA’s toolkit, “Get Ready: Preparing Your Community for a Disaster,” includes a PowerPoint presentation for providing disaster preparation tips to the public. The toolkit’s fact sheets help with preparation for varied types if disasters, including blackouts, floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes. Fact sheets are also available in Spanish.

Image of the fire safety maze with fire safety words and a tree designating Sparky's outside meeting place.Reinforce this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme–Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out™– with students and community members of all ages using Sparky’s Fire Safety Maze. The maze directs participants to follow the path to Sparky’s outside meeting place–the tree in his front yard–by plotting a path alphabetically from the word “alarm” to the word “zeal” with plenty of other fire safety-related words in between. The maze and other teaching tools can be used as complements to other FPW materials including the Fire Prevention Week Kids’ Activity Posters, Sparky’s Coloring Book and Crayons Set, and the Fox Family’s Fire Escape Plan Coloring Book.

Photo of Laura KingIn an effort to expand fire and life safety education across Canada, NFPA recently filled the contract position of Public Education Representative, Canada. Laura King, most recently editor of Fire Fighting in Canada magazine, will engage with NFPA stakeholders throughout Canada. Her work will entail the following:

  • identifying ways to improve fire safety education in Canada and advance NFPA’s public education messaging
  • advising on innovative and creative ways to provide Canadian communities with knowledge and skills they need to live safer lives
  • developing and maintaining relationships with existing national, provincial, and local organizations across Canada
  • meeting and speaking with fire departments and others who engage in safety education with local citizens of all ages

Laura is well known to the fire service in Canada. As an editor and writer, not only at Fire Fighting in Canada, but at a number of daily newspapers, she has covered fire service issues in the provinces and territories and has built a strong network of contacts.

Image of Sparky holding a flashlightIt is Week 2 of National Preparedness Month. The theme for this week is “Plan to Help Your Neighbor and Community.” Life-threatening emergencies can happen fast. Emergency responders aren’t always nearby. You may be able to save a life by taking simple actions immediately. FEMA places tremendous value on communities that embrace a local “Neighbors Helping Neighbors” approach. NFPA, which has joined forces with FEMA for The words "National Preparedness Month" and images of a flashlight, first aid kit, radio, piggy bankNational Preparedness Month, has a number of resources communities can use. Invite family, friends, and neighbors to learn about escape planning using the Plan Your Home Fire Escape mini-lesson. The mini-lesson provides a step-by-step approach to addressing the topic. You can cap off the mini-lesson by having everyone review and complete the emergency plan cards, the emergency plan form, and the emergency checklist in NFPA’s Get Ready! Preparing Your Community for a Disaster toolkit. National Preparedness Month is when focus is given to taking steps to prepare for emergencies in our homes, businesses, schools and communities. The 2017 theme is “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You can.” Each week of PrepareAthon has its own theme.

According to Orange County, Florida officials, three people died from carbon monoxide poisoning from a Photo of a generator followed by Safety tipsgenerator running after Hurricane Irma knocked out power. Four other members of the multigenerational family were taken to Florida Hospital in very serious condition. A news report states that The Orange County deputy who responded to the home was overwhelmed by the fumes and had to step outside. He was treated on the scene. Another dozen people in Brevard and Polk counties were poisoned Tuesday by carbon monoxide from generators running in their garages.

“Generators, which release carbon monoxide, should never be used indoors, in garages, or any place that is not well ventilated,” said Orange County spokesperson Doreen Overstreet.

Carbon monoxide is a gas you cannot see, taste, or smell. It is often called the “invisible killer.” It is created when fossil fuels, such as kerosene, gasoline, coal, natural gas, propane, methane, or wood do not burn completely.

NFPA offers the following reminders:

  • Generators should be used in well ventilated locations outside at least 5 feet from all doors, windows, and vent openings.
  • Never use a generator in an attached garage, even with the door open.
  • Place generators so that exhaust fumes can’t enter the home through windows, doors, or other openings in the building. The exhaust must be directed away from the building.
  • Make sure to install carbon monoxide alarms in your home.

The Generator Safety tip sheet has additional reminders as does the fact sheet on blackouts included in NFPA’s toolkit: Get Ready! Preparing Your Community for a Disaster.

college fire safety, study abroad

 

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing.During this second week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we want to focus on fire safety for students studying abroad.

 

In 2011, a fast-moving fire swept through a building in Paris that killed four people and injured many others. Three of the victims were students studying abroad. The building where they lived had no smoke alarms, no fire escapes, and only narrow wooden stairwells that became overcrowded and impassable in the fire.


When it comes to college students, including those traveling and studying abroad, we can't emphasize safety enough. Other countries approach fire safety and public education differently, according to a column in the January/February 2017 NFPA Journal issue called, Fire Safety Abroad. It's on us to understand these differences and take the appropriate steps to help ensure the safety of our young adults when they go overseas.Three of these tips include:


• Take a couple of battery-operated smoke alarms with you and place them in the apartment
• Try and live on a low floor so you can be reached by a fire truck ladder
• Choose a residence made of brick or stone rather than wood and with unobstructed windows


As students apply for and prepare for semester abroad programs, review these simple but lifesaving measures. As a fire safety educator or parent, take the time to talk to your student(s) about the risks and the steps they can take to stay safe from fire while away from home. 


Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists and our student-to student checklist at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

Multiple choice quiz questions on a blue/green background

Put your community’s fire safety I.Q. to the test this Fire Prevention Week in a fun way with the Fire Prevention Week quiz. The true/false-multiple choice quiz tests knowledge on smoke alarms, extinguishing a fire, home fire escape planning, and fire statistics while reinforcing vital fire safety messaging. The quiz can be used by fire departments and others as an ice breaker before an FPW presentation using FPW products, such as Fire Prevention Week in a Box Value Pack.

 

In his first few months as the State Fire Marshal for the State of Michigan, Kevin Sehlmeyer prioritized a Community Risk Reduction approach as one of his first goals in order to tackle and largely reduce the fire death rate in his state.  Currently Michigan rates 5th in the Nation.  Reading materials were distributed in advance, including The NFPA Urban Fire and Life Safety Task Force paper “Community Risk Reduction:  Doing More With More”.  Experts, leaders, and representatives were assembled for a day-long retreat with the goal of exiting the room with a plan in hand.  The steps leading to the goal were sometimes tedious, but facilitation by members of the Grand Rapids Fire Department held the participant’s attention throughout the day’s tasks.  Among the goals of Michigan were; providing consistent and accurate education programs, ensuring residents of Michigan have sufficient and appropriate numbers of smoke alarms, establishing dedicated revenue streams, and a fire code that supports the efforts.  And while public education is just a part of the equation, Meredith Hawes – NFPA Regional Education Specialist, was on-hand to shine light on all of the resources available to support Michigan’s mission, such as the Educational Messages Desk Reference, and the Planning and Implementing a Successful Smoke Alarm Installation Program, to name just a few.

Text in ornate script of Nevada proclaiming Fire Prevenion Week with governor's signature

The state of Nevada has issued a proclamation for Fire Prevention Week. Governor Brian Sandoval has signed the proclamation, which will be housed on the state website.

Issuing a proclamation on the municipal or state level is an excellent way to shine the spotlight on the work of the first responders in your community, helping to reinforce the lifesaving messages of the annual Fire Prevention Week theme. A proclamation signing ceremony can present a great photo opportunity for the media, and valuable exposure for the fire department.

NFPA streamlines the process with a template you can use to tailor a proclamation to your community.

The Fire Prevention Week section of the NFPA website provides ideas for a number of ways to promote the annual campaign, including an infographic, which can be placed on social media or printed and distributed, a template news release, fundraising ideas and social media messages.

campus fire safety, fire safety abroad, student fire safety

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing.

 

During this first week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we want to focus on household appliances. In the whirlwind of our morning routine there’s always a chance we’ll forget our keys or lunch or (fill in your own item!). Add in distractions like texts or work/school email and it’s more likely we’ll walk out the door without remembering to turn off the lights or more importantly, turn off appliances that generate heat and increase our risk for fire (think:  coffee pots, hair straighteners, etc.).

 

The short video below hosted by a local student provides a quick reminder about the importance of turning off appliances.

 

If you’re a fire safety educator, a professional responsible for student safety on campus, or a parent, take a couple of seconds to review the video and share it with your student(s) on social media, online or in a face-face meeting. 

 

Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists and our campus fire safety tip sheet at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

Photo of Mom and daughter looking over emergency planSeptember is National Preparedness Month (NPM), when we focus on taking steps to prepare for emergencies in our homes, businesses, schools, and communities. The goal of NPM is to increase the overall number of individuals, families, and communities engaging in preparedness actions at home, work, business, school, and places of worship. NFPA has joined forces with the FEMA in championing this cause. Each week of PrepareAthon has its own theme.

Week 1: September 1-9         Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends

Week 2: September 10-16     Plan to Help Your Neighbor and Community

Week 3: September 17-23     Practice and Build Out Your Plans

Week 4: September 24-30     Get Involved! Be a Part of Something Larger  

This week’s focus is on making an emergency plan. NFPA’s toolkit, “Get Ready! Preparing Your Community for a Disaster,” includes an emergency plan form, emergency plan cards, and an emergency supply kit checklist that community members can use to be prepared in the event of a disaster.

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