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2019

Summer boating season is here. Recreational boaters are encouraged to be responsible through public awareness campaigns, such as National Safe Boating Week, which concluded on May 24th and National Fishing and Boating Week, which takes place June 2-10.  According to the National Safety Council, more than 11 million recreational vessels are registered in the U.S., an indication that many, many people are enjoying time on and in the water. It’s important to stay safe by being prepared for emergencies and exercising good judgment. NFPA’s Marina & Boating Safety tip sheet explains how to avoid electrical hazards in and around the water as well as the dangers of carbon monoxide.

As NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at electrical safety around the home. The home electrical safety section of the ESFI website, along with NFPA’s home electrical safety materials, including the entertaining while informative “A Shocking Revelation” video, provide basic electrical safety principles to help educate homeowners, consumers, older adults, and children.

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. Home electrical fires can start in wiring, electrical distribution systems, and lighting equipment, as well as any equipment powered by electricity, such as cooking, heating, office and entertainment equipment, washers, and dryers.

generator safety

 

As NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at portable generator safety. ESFIs Generator Safety Infographic and NFPA’s tip sheet on portable generator safety provide tips on proper installation and use of generators as well as statistics on high-risk groups, causes of fatalities, and the importance of having working carbon monoxide alarms.

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. Home electrical fires can start in wiring, electrical distribution systems, and lighting equipment, as well as any equipment powered by electricity, such as cooking, heating, office and entertainment equipment, washers, and dryers.

The campaign highlights safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers.

 

 

As NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at safety during hurricanes. ESFI’s Hurricane Electrical Safety Infographic and NFPA’stip sheet on hurricane safety provide precautions before, during, and after the storm. The Atlantic hurricane season is June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. On average there are 6 hurricanes, three which are categorized as “major,” each year. History provides important examples of the potentially dangerous impact hurricanes can have and the need to be prepared.

Prepare for the storm:

•Charge all phone and communications devices

•Unplug all electronics and move them as high as possible

•If recommended by utilities or emergency offices, turn off breakers to avoid power surges

Weather the storm:

•Stay indoors during hurricanes and away from windows and glass

•Never operate a portable generator inside your home

•Never connect a generator directly into your homes wiring unless a transfer switch has been installed

•Always use GFCIs in areas where water and electricity may come in contact

Recover from the storm:

•Do not use electrical equipment and electronics, including receptacles, that have been submerged in water

•Have a qualified electrician inspect any water damaged electrical equipment and electronics

•Stay away from downed power lines. If you encounter a downed power line, stay at least 35 feet away and do not touch the line or anything that may be in contact with the line

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. The campaign highlights safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers.

ESFI infographic on flooding and electrical safety

NFPA flooding safety tip sheetAs NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at safety during flooding. Flooding can occur anywhere, but water and electricity don’t mix. Electrical hazards may linger after flood waters recede. ESFI provides an infographic and NFPA has a safety tip sheet that can be used to reinforce messaging noting dangers and ways to reduce risk. National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. The campaign highlights safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers.

Colorful Infographic with numbered safety steps when doing outdoor electrical work

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. NFPA has championed the campaign with ESFI by Image of exterior of home followed by safety tips.highlighting safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers. NFPA and ESFI offer an extensive library of safety materials surrounding electricity. Let's take a look at outdoor electrical safety. Before starting an outdoor project, ESFI advises to “Always Look Up,” to be alert to where power lines are located and know where they are hanging, whether while working on the roof, trimming trees, or painting the siding. The “Always Look Up” video and infographic offer reminders of this important step. And NFPAs Outdoor Electrical Safety tip sheet reinforces safety messaging around outside electrical work and equipment safety.

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