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186 Posts authored by: laurenbackstrom Employee

Vision 20/20 just launched their  Fire Safety Materials Generator, created with funding from AFG. The Materials Generator allows fire departments to design their own public education materials based on the latest social marketing research, and customize them to reflect the demographics and fire risks of their community. This online tool makes it easy to brand the materials with your own logo and contact information, and to select text and images that have been proven through testing to have the greatest impact on audiences, especially those at high fire risk.

The messages you’ll find in the Materials Generator focus on smoke alarms for now, but Vision 20/20 will be adding new content on cooking safety in the near future. 

Vision 20/20 believes (and we agree!) that the new Materials Generator will make it easier for fire departments to reach their diverse communities with well-researched materials and methods. By expanding the availability of customized outreach tools designed to educate the public (especially high risk audiences) about the value of and need for working smoke alarms, Vision 20/20 hopes to help create a national in-kind marketing strategy that reaches millions of people nationally. Rallying fire departments across the nation by making it easy and affordable to deliver their message locally is a great start.  

To access the Materials Generator and other Vision 20/20 resources, visit www.strategicfire.org.

Today, about 60 (from an applicant pool of over 1,100!) fire and life safety educators from rural fire departments across the U.S., are at our Quincy headquarters for a two day symposium diving into their particular needs and challenges.

 

Throughout the two days, attendees will have the opportunity to hear from many NFPA staff members on topics that will hopefully help them back home including NFPA's free public education resources, fire and life safety challenges and solutions, prevention efforts, and how to use data to learn about and develop solutions for the rural fire problem. One of these presentations will also be live streamed at 1:15pm ET today - so tune in to hear about big data tools for small departments by NFPA's Matt Hinds-Aldrich.

 

We hope to learn as much from attendees as they learn from us today as well, so there are many opportunities for brainstorming, sharing, questions and networking, and we are excited to have everyone here.

 

Want to get involved, or learn more? Join our Xchange Rural Firefighters Connection group to stay updated on the symposium's events as well as to network with attendees and others into the future.  

March Safety Source newsletterThe March issue Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

  • What do a funeral parlor, hunting lodge, veterinary clinic, and public library have in common? They all play a role in the public education efforts of the newly chosen Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Year.
  • They can uproot trees, toss around cars, and destroy buildings. Did you know that tornadoes are more common in the United States than in any other country? Learn how to prepare for tornado season, which began this month.
  • Guess who’s got 66 candles on the birthday cake and wants you to join in on the celebration.

 

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

The February issue Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

  • Recent news accounts of carbon monoxide poisonings are chilling. Learn of the warning signs and precautions you can take.
  • They’re used by athletes to recover from training injuries and patients as part of their medical treatment. But hyperbaric chambers are raising concerns about potential fire hazards.
  • It’s time to get moving this winter season with a little help from Sparky and his friends.

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

Safety Source newsletterThe January issue Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

  • We’ve read the headlines and heard the disturbing stories about smartphones bursting into flames. Why is this happening? Our new lithium ion battery safety tip sheet explains and offers suggestions for avoiding the problems.
  • Winter storms can last for days and leave you with both cabin fever and unsafe conditions. Get some timely “management tips” in our new tip sheet.
  • Do you live in an apartment building? Know someone who does? Learn about the important fire safety equipment particular to apartment buildings.

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

NFPA and the United States Fire Administration (USFA) are teaming up to help reduce your risk to winter fires and other hazards, including carbon monoxide and electrical fires, over the next couple of months. Learn more about these specific elements of winter fire safety to help keep you safe this winter through our Put a Freeze on Winter Fires campaign.

 

We have an updated infographic that you can share in your communities and with your friends and family to help them learn about some of the fire dangers of the winter season. Please link back to www.nfpa.org/winterfreeze when using the infographic online. 

With the holiday now behind us, O Christmas tree, how saggy are your branches? The gifts have been removed from under the pine, the tree is swiftly losing its coat of green, and the needles are piling up on the floor, which means it’s time to remove the tree from your home.


Our stats show that nearly 40 percent of home fires that begin with Christmas trees occur in January. Although these fires are not common, they are much more likely to be serious when they do occur. On average, one of every 34 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death. Compare that to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires.


Christmas trees are decorations, and people may want to continue the festive spirit and leave up their ever-drying pines long after the last of the gifts have been opened. It’s good to remember, however, that the longer the tree remains in the home, the greater the fire risk becomes.

 

If available, NFPA recommends using the local community’s recycling program for tree disposal. Trees should not be put in the garage or left outside. NFPA also offers tips on removing lighting and decorations from trees to ensure they are taken down safely this year and in the right condition for next Christmas:

  • Use the gripping area on the plug when unplugging electrical decorations. Never pull the cord to unplug any device from an electrical outlet, as this can harm the wire and insulation of the cord, increasing the risk for shock or electrical fire.
  • As you pack up light strings, inspect each line for damage, throwing out any sets that have loose connections, broken sockets or cracked or bare wires.
  • Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags, or wrap them around a piece of cardboard.
  • Store electrical decorations in a dry place away from children and pets where they will not be damaged by water or dampness.


For additional resources and information for a fire-safe holiday season, visit “Project Holiday.”

 

Carefully decorating your home can help make your holidays safer. Between 2009-2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 210 home fires that started with Christmas trees per year. U.S. fire departments also responded to an estimated average of 860 home structure fires per year that began with decorations, excluding Christmas trees.

 

In the throes of holiday shopping and decorating? Watch this video for some tips on beautifully decorating your home for the holidays and keeping it fire safe. 

 

For more information on holiday safety, visit the NFPA Project Holiday website

 

U.S. fire departments respond to an estimated average of 210 home structure fires per year that began with Christmas trees per NFPA's most recent report on the topic. These fires cause an annual average of six civilian deaths, 16 civilian injuries, and $16.2 million in direct property damage. Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are much more likely to be deadly than most other fires.


In this video above, you'll get a side-by-side demonstration of how quickly a dry Christmas tree will go up in flames, especially when compared with a well-watered tree. 

 

Be sure to keep your tree watered regularly, and keep anything that can burn (candles, stockings, etc) at least three feet away. For more on Christmas tree fire safety visit our Project Holiday website

Everyone's favorite, Dan Doofus, stars in "Kitchen for Trouble" where he has to learn the hard way how to prevent cooking fires. Home cooking fires are the leading cause of home fires, and nearly 4 times as many cooking fires happen on Thanksgiving. That means, it is the perfect time of year to brush up on your safety tips - and what better way than to watch as Dan learns these lessons for us!

 

November Safety SourceThe November issue Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

 

  • They’re becoming more and more common and they number in the millions–multigenerational households. Find out the benefits and safety concerns in NFPA’s new community toolkit.
  • It’s an issue that causes angst in homes on a periodic basis–how to dispose of the old smoke alarm. A new tip sheet takes away the worry with easy-to-follow do’s and don’ts.
  • Your Thanksgiving meal wouldn’t be complete without a key ingredient: a safety tip sheet that adds the right flavor to your holiday.
  • And more!

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

The October issue Safety Source, NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

• Buckle up and hang on tight as a new video takes you on a thrill ride beginning in the early years of firefighting and ending somewhere in the future.
• “We’re ready for our close-up!” That’s what members of one fire department are saying now that they’ve been chosen for the cover of the 2017 Fire Prevention Week catalog.
• Ever carved a pumpkin to look like our favorite Dalmatian? Make your very own Sparky-o’-lantern using Sparky’s Pumpkin Template and pick up some Halloween safety tips while you’re at it.

 

And there’s much, much more.

 

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

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NFPA employees love Fire Prevention Week, and the safety messages that it promotes. They also love their local fire departments! With Fire Prevention Week coming up next week, we wanted to give employees the chance to tie together these two passions.

 

This year, we ran a contest for employees to win the opportunity to donate a Fire Prevention Week in a Box (which includes an FPW Banner, FPW News, magnets, stickers, goodie bags, brochures, posters, and kids activity posters) to their local fire department. 6 lucky winners were selected and some shared photos with us of their donations in their local towns, which included Norwood, MA, Avon, Ma, Lakeville, MA, West Quincy, MA, Holbrook, MA, and The Town of Clue Mountains, Canada!

sept.JPGThe September issue Safety Source. NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

  • A video starring Sparky the Fire Dog that takes the fuss out of shopping for Fire Prevention Week 'must haves'
  • Lessons learned on fire and life safety from the cannabis capital of the world
  • The most up-to-date NFPA educational messaging featuring modified messaging around sleeping with the door closed
  • Tips on how you can be prepared for the unexpected when you're in public

 

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

august.JPGThe August issue Safety Source. NFPA's public education newsletter, is now available for viewing. In this issue, you will find:

  • Back to school safety for college students
  • New safety tip sheet on marina and boating safety
  • Details on upcoming Fire Prevention Week webinar
  • Tips on how to check out your car before any long holiday weekend roadtrips
  • And more!

Don't miss an issue! Sign up now and be the first to get the latest information on happenings in the public education division; activities, fire statistics, trends, educational tips, Sparky the Fire Dog and more!

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