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Cover image of July Safety Source

The July issue of Safety Source, the Public Education newsletter provides cautions in an around the water with our Marina and Boating tip sheet, a fun family Fire Prevention Week activity in the form of a fire escape checklist, and details on the recently released NFPA 1300, Standard on Community Risk Assessment and Community Risk Reduction Plan Development. There’s also much, much more.

Cover issue of June Safety Source

The June issue of Safety Source, the Public Education newsletter, sizzles with a “hot dog” of a Father’s Day e-card from Sparky the Fire Dog®, helpful hints on how to stay safe while traveling in the RV or camper this summer, and the highly anticipated details about this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme. There’s also much, much more.

Cover image of Desk Reference. Safety Words in French

For years the NFPA Educational Messages Desk Reference has been the “go-to” document for fire and life safety educators looking for accurate and consistent burn and fire safety messaging to use when providing information to the public. Now the document is reaching a broader audience–French Canadian speakers. The 2019 NFPA Educational Messages French Canadian Edition is available on NFPA’s Canadian Fire Education Materials page as well as the Educational Messaging page. We express thanks to the catalysts behind this effort– Laura King, NFPA’s Public Education Representative for Canada, Paul Dainton, public education network representative in Nunavut, the government translators, and the Nunavut Office of the Fire Marshal. A Spanish edition of the Desk Reference is in the works.

Summer boating season is here. Recreational boaters are encouraged to be responsible through public awareness campaigns, such as National Safe Boating Week, which concluded on May 24th and National Fishing and Boating Week, which takes place June 2-10.  According to the National Safety Council, more than 11 million recreational vessels are registered in the U.S., an indication that many, many people are enjoying time on and in the water. It’s important to stay safe by being prepared for emergencies and exercising good judgment. NFPA’s Marina & Boating Safety tip sheet explains how to avoid electrical hazards in and around the water as well as the dangers of carbon monoxide.

As NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at electrical safety around the home. The home electrical safety section of the ESFI website, along with NFPA’s home electrical safety materials, including the entertaining while informative “A Shocking Revelation” video, provide basic electrical safety principles to help educate homeowners, consumers, older adults, and children.

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. Home electrical fires can start in wiring, electrical distribution systems, and lighting equipment, as well as any equipment powered by electricity, such as cooking, heating, office and entertainment equipment, washers, and dryers.

generator safety

 

As NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at portable generator safety. ESFIs Generator Safety Infographic and NFPA’s tip sheet on portable generator safety provide tips on proper installation and use of generators as well as statistics on high-risk groups, causes of fatalities, and the importance of having working carbon monoxide alarms.

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. Home electrical fires can start in wiring, electrical distribution systems, and lighting equipment, as well as any equipment powered by electricity, such as cooking, heating, office and entertainment equipment, washers, and dryers.

The campaign highlights safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers.

 

 

As NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at safety during hurricanes. ESFI’s Hurricane Electrical Safety Infographic and NFPA’stip sheet on hurricane safety provide precautions before, during, and after the storm. The Atlantic hurricane season is June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. On average there are 6 hurricanes, three which are categorized as “major,” each year. History provides important examples of the potentially dangerous impact hurricanes can have and the need to be prepared.

Prepare for the storm:

•Charge all phone and communications devices

•Unplug all electronics and move them as high as possible

•If recommended by utilities or emergency offices, turn off breakers to avoid power surges

Weather the storm:

•Stay indoors during hurricanes and away from windows and glass

•Never operate a portable generator inside your home

•Never connect a generator directly into your homes wiring unless a transfer switch has been installed

•Always use GFCIs in areas where water and electricity may come in contact

Recover from the storm:

•Do not use electrical equipment and electronics, including receptacles, that have been submerged in water

•Have a qualified electrician inspect any water damaged electrical equipment and electronics

•Stay away from downed power lines. If you encounter a downed power line, stay at least 35 feet away and do not touch the line or anything that may be in contact with the line

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. The campaign highlights safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers.

ESFI infographic on flooding and electrical safety

NFPA flooding safety tip sheetAs NFPA works alongside the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to increase electrical safety awareness throughout May—National Electrical Safety Month—we take a look at safety during flooding. Flooding can occur anywhere, but water and electricity don’t mix. Electrical hazards may linger after flood waters recede. ESFI provides an infographic and NFPA has a safety tip sheet that can be used to reinforce messaging noting dangers and ways to reduce risk. National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by ESFI in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. The campaign highlights safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers.

Colorful Infographic with numbered safety steps when doing outdoor electrical work

National Electrical Safety Month was introduced by the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) in the mid-1990s to bring awareness to home electrical safety. NFPA has championed the campaign with ESFI by Image of exterior of home followed by safety tips.highlighting safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers. NFPA and ESFI offer an extensive library of safety materials surrounding electricity. Let's take a look at outdoor electrical safety. Before starting an outdoor project, ESFI advises to “Always Look Up,” to be alert to where power lines are located and know where they are hanging, whether while working on the roof, trimming trees, or painting the siding. The “Always Look Up” video and infographic offer reminders of this important step. And NFPAs Outdoor Electrical Safety tip sheet reinforces safety messaging around outside electrical work and equipment safety.

 

May is National Electrical Safety Month, introduced to the public in the mid-1990s by the Electrical Safety Foundation International to bring awareness to home electrical safety for families.

Home electrical fires can start in wiring, electrical distribution systems, and lighting equipment, as well as any equipment powered by electricity, such as cooking, heating, office and entertainment equipment, washers, and dryers.

NFPA has championed National Electrical Safety Month with ESFI by promoting safety activities throughout the month that can be used by safety advocates, educators and consumers. During the next several weeks I’ll be sharing videos, infographics, and tip sheets from both organizations designed to help prevent these types of fires.

 

Each year, Earth Day (April 22) marks the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement in the 1970s. Now, more than 5,000 environmental groups in more than 180 countries reach out to hundreds of millions of people in a show of support for environmental protection. Children can do their part to protect their environment with the help of Sparky the Fire Dog® and his Earth Smarts checklist. By checking off everything on the list, children can protect animals, trees, plants, and their home.

The Congressional Fire Services Institute’s Board of Directors has selected Chief Russ Sanders as the recipient of the 2019 CFSI/Motorola Solutions Mason Lankford Fire Service Leadership Award. Sanders is the NFPA regional director for the central region of the United States. The presentation will take place at the 31st Annual National Fire and Emergency Services Dinner on April 25, 2019, at the Washington Hilton, in Washington, D.C.

Chief Russ Sanders

Throughout his distinguished career, Sanders has held leadership positions in numerous national and international organizations and committees, including Executive Secretary of the Metropolitan Fire Chiefs Association and the Director of Central Field Operations for NFPA. On the international level, he serves as the President of the United States Delegation to the Comite Technique Internationale de Prevention and d ’Extinction de Feu. He also is the NFPA representative to the European Fire Service, the National Fire Chiefs Council of the United Kingdom, the Institution of Fire Engineers, the Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authorities Council, and the Global Fire Service Leadership Alliance.

“Russ Sanders has distinguished himself on so many levels and in so many areas within the fire and emergency services,” said Dr. William F. Jenaway, CFSI President. “He has made significant contributions in the areas of public safety and prevention, research, codes and standards, and leadership.”

 

March 23rd is National Puppy Day. Established in 2006, National Puppy Day is a “paw-some” opportunity for all dog enthusiasts to celebrate “puppy love” with their favorite fur ball of a canine. The day is also designed to raise awareness about puppy mills and help prospective pet owners consider adoption. In addition, it can be fitting on National Puppy Day to remind ourselves about the precautions that need to be taken with our pets. Simply put, pets can cause fires. Some pets chew through electrical cords. Others bump into or knock over cooking equipment. We can reduce the chances of a tragedy by reviewing precautions included in NFPAs Pet Fire Safety tip sheet. So at the very “leashed,” relax and cuddle up with your adorable puppy pooch, while keeping both humans and four-legged friends safe from fire.

 

It’s a topic that’s made news headlines and is on the minds of many: how to keep schools safe and secure in the face of mass shootings in the United States. As school administrators and community officials work to protect schools from acts of targeted violence, the School Safety and Security Update fact sheet helps answer frequently asked questions and provides guidance on safe door locking. The fact sheet explains NFPAs current provisions and how they can be safely applied. On the more general topic of safety in public venues, the Safety in Places of Public Assembly tip sheet offers guidance for staying safe in the face of natural disasters, acts of terrorism, or some other type of disaster or crisis. The tips sheet offers advice before entering a building, when you enter, and what to do during an emergency.

               NFPA tip sheet safety in public places           

City of Kingsport Fire Department Public Education Officer Barry Brickey has been chosen the 2019 Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Year. Brickey has been using NFPA’s Learn Not to Burn® program in the city’s elementary schools since 2006. He has also used NFPAs Remembering When™ program since 2010.

In 2006 he developed a billboard campaign themed with Fire Prevention Week slogans and home fire sprinkler messaging. The Kingsport Fire Department partnered with the state fire marshal’s office for a smoke alarm billboard in October 2018.

In 2011 Brickey won a contest to become the voice of Sparky the Fire Dog for NFPAs “Sparky and the Runaway Robot” and to celebrate Sparky’s birthday. For Fire Prevention Week that year, Brickey participated in a national radio media tour as the voice of Sparky.

He worked with the Holsten Valley Trauma Center Injury Prevention, the Kingsport Police and Contact 211 of Northeast Tennessee, to help reduce call numbers at a high-volume apartment complex.

He is the recipient of the 2006 Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office Fire Educator of the Year and the 2018 Tennessee Public Fire Educators Association Bruce Womack Fire Educator of the Year award.

Barry Brickey NFPA 2019 fire and life safety educator of the year

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