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129 Posts authored by: lisamariesinatra Employee

As Hurricanes Marco and Laura approach the Gulf Coast this week, experts are calling their arrival “unprecedented” as the two storms could make landfall within days of each other. Weather experts are also reminding coastal communities that additional storms could still be on the horizon, with late September and October being the peak months for hurricane activity.

 

To help residents navigate this storm season, NFPA provides the following electrical safety tips that can help reduce the risk for injury before, during, and after a storm:

 

  • Listen to local weather reports for current weather and flooding conditions
  • Turn off utilities if instructed to do so by authorities and turn off propane tanks.
  • Stay out of flood waters, if possible, and do not drive into flooded areas. Even water only several inches deep can be dangerous.
  • Treat all downed wires as if they are live even if you don’t see any sparks, and especially if there is standing water nearby. Alert authorities immediately if you see downed wires in your area.
  • If your home has experienced flooding, it’s important to keep your power off until a professional electrician has inspected your entire home for safety, including appliances. Water can damage the internal components in electrical appliances like refrigerators, washing machines and dryers, and cause shock and fire hazards. Have a qualified electrician come visit your home and determine what electrical equipment should be replaced and what can be reconditioned.
  • If you smell gas in your home or neighborhood, notify emergency authorities immediately. Do not turn on lights, light matches, or engage in any activity that could create a spark.
  • In the event that electricity may not be available to your home and you have not experienced any water in your home, generators are a viable option to power some of your small appliances. However, if used improperly they also pose a fire hazard, risk of carbon monoxide poisoning, and electrocution.

 

The following are key guidelines for using a portable generator:

  • Generators should be operated in well ventilated locations outdoors away from all doors, windows and vent openings.generator safety
  • Never use a generator in an attached garage, even with the door open.
  • Place generators so that exhaust fumes can’t enter the home through windows, doors, or other openings in the building.

 

NFPA’s safety tip sheet on portable generators provides these steps and more to help keep you safe.

 

For any questions or concerns about your home’s electrical system, including after a storm, contact a qualified electrician who can help, and visit our electrical safety webpage for additional tips and resources.

 

Related information can found on NFPA’s “emergency preparedness” webpage.

 

 

With the arrival of summer and the July 4th holiday weekend just around the corner, people across the country are eager to take advantage of the easing of stay-at-home orders. As many states begin allowing for more outside activities, it’s important to recognize potential electrical hazards that exist in swimming pools and hot tubs, onboard boats, and in waters surrounding boats, marinas, and launch ramps.

 

While most people are unaware of electrical dangers posed in water environments such as electric shock drowning (ESD), each year people are injured or killed from these hazards. Electric shock drowning happens when marina or onboard electrical systems leak electric current into the water. The current then passes through the body and causes paralysis. When this happens, a person can no longer swim and ultimately drowns. 

 

In the current pandemic situation, with limited staff at marinas and people obeying social distancing protocols, the onus is on individuals to keep themselves, their loved ones, and the people who might have to rescue them out of harm’s way.

 

Check out NFPA's video below on water safety that informs the public of the dangers of electricity surrounding marinas, docks, and boatyards. 

 

 

Here are some tips for pool and boat owners, as well as swimmers:

 

Tips for swimmers

  • Never swim near a marina, dock, or boatyard.
  • While in a pool or hot tub, look out for underwater lights that are not working properly, flicker, or work intermittently.
  • If you feel a tingling sensation while in a pool, immediately stop swimming in your current direction. Try and swim in a direction where you had not felt the tingling. Exit the water as quickly as possible; avoid using metal ladders or rails. Touching metal may increase the risk of shock.

 

         Tips for pool owners

  • Have a qualified electrician periodically inspect and — where necessary — replace or upgrade the electrical devices or equipment that keep your pool or hot tub electrically safe. Have the electrician show you how to turn off all power in case of an emergency.
  • Make sure any overhead lines maintain the proper distance over a pool and other structures, such as a diving board. If you have any doubts, contact a qualified electrician or your local utility company to make sure power lines are a safe distance away.

 

Tips for boat owners

  • When heading out for a day on the water, follow all existing navigation and safety rules. Practice good seamanship and avoid becoming a boater in distress. With the current pandemic, there may be fewer staff at the marina and fewer rescue personnel available to come to your aid. 
  • Contact your local marina or boatyard in advance to learn about any local requirements in response to the pandemic that must be followed – especially if you are a transient customer. 
  • Avoid entering the water when launching or loading a boat. These areas can contain stray electrical currents in the water, possibly leading to electric shock drowning or injury from shock, including death.
  • Each year, and after any major storm that affects the boat, have the boat’s electrical system inspected by a qualified marine electrician to be sure it meets the required codes of your area, including the American Boat & Yacht Council. Make the necessary repairs if recommended.
  • Have ground fault circuit protection (GFCI and GFPE) installed on circuits supplying the boat; use only portable GFCIs or shore power cords (including “Y” adapters) that bear the proper listing mark for marine applications when using electricity near water. Test GFCIs monthly.

 

NFPA has these and additional resources for swimmers, boat and pool owners, including tip sheets, checklists, and more that can be downloaded and shared. Please visit www.nfpa.org/watersafety.

May is Electrical Safety Month and NFPA and ESFI have been working together these last few weeks to help raise awareness of home electrical hazards. During this last week of the campaign, we’re talking about the importance of GFCIs, AFCIs, and TRRs. While these acronyms may look like alphabet soup, they are actually important devices that can help keep you and your loved ones safer from shock, electrocution, and fire in your home.

 

The formal name for AFCI is “arc-fault circuit-interrupters.” AFCIs are designed to detect arcing electrical faults within your electrical system that may otherwise go unnoticed, and result in a fire. Arc-faults can be caused by such innocent actions as putting a nail in the wall to hang a picture or plugging in an appliance with a defective electrical cord. If a nail makes contact with an electrical wire or a cord has a defect, arcing can happen, which can lead to high temperatures and sparking. An AFCI device, however, will continuously monitor the electrical current in a circuit and will shut if off when unintended arcing occurs.  

 

A GFCI, or ground-fault circuit-interrupter, works similarly to an AFCI. A ground-fault is an unintentional electrical path between a source of electrical current and a grounded surface, like a wall, counter, or table. GFCIs are designed to protect people from hazardous ground faults that can arise from such things as plugging in defective appliances or corded equipment. Electrical shock can occur if a person comes in contact with an energized part. GFCIs can greatly reduce this risk of shock by immediately shutting off an electrical circuit when that circuit represents a shock hazard (i.e. when a person comes in contact with a faulty appliance and the grounded surface).

 

TRRs, or tamper-resistant electrical receptacles, function electrically like a standard receptacle but they add a built-in safety mechanism that helps prevent electricity from energizing anything that is stuck into the receptacle that shouldn’t be. The receptacles have spring-loaded shutters that close off the contact openings, or slots, of the receptacles. When a plug is inserted into the receptacle, both springs are compressed and the shutters then open, allowing for the metal prongs to make contact to create an electrical circuit. But, when a child, for instance, attempts to insert an object into only one contact opening there is no contact with electricity because both springs must be compressed at the same time (i.e. from a plug) for the shutters to open.

 

Are you wondering if these devices can make a difference? Well, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), it is estimated that more than 50 percent of electrical fires that occur every year can be prevented by arc fault circuit interrupters, and 50 percent of home electrocutions have been prevented by the introduction of GFCIs.

 

Does your home have lifesaving AFCIs, GFCIs or TRRs? If you have any questions or concerns, a qualified electrician can survey the house and install these devices properly to help prevent shock and electrocution from happening in your home. Even during this time of social distancing, electricians are still working and considered essential businesses in every state that has issued a stay at home order. It is critical that you call your utility company or qualified electrician immediately if you experience any of the following:

 

  • Frequent problems with blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers
  • A tingling feeling when you touch an electrical appliance
  • Discolored or warm wall outlets
  • A burning or rubbery smell coming from an appliance
  • Flickering or dimming lights
  • Sparks from an outlet

 

Keeping a watchful eye on our surroundings can go a long way to helping reduce the risk of injury and damage from electrical hazards. More information about AFCIs, GFCIs, tamper resistant receptacles, and Electrical Safety Month, including tips sheets, infographics, videos, and more can be found on NFPA’s electrical safety webpage.

 

As all of us continue to navigate the evolving situation with COVID-19, NFPA remains committed to supporting you with the resources you need to minimize risk and help prevent loss, injuries, and death from fire, electrical, and other hazards. For information on NFPA’s response to the coronavirus, please visit our webpage.

 

 

electrical safety

During the last few weeks, amid the coronavirus pandemic, thousands of working professionals and students alike have left their offices and classrooms to continue their work from home. This means more family members are now online, watching television, and using appliances all at once, and for longer periods of time.

 

This new approach to working, while keeping us safer from the virus, also presents challenges related to electrical systems in houses and apartments. To help reduce your risk of electrical fires as you work from home, NFPA recommends the following actions:

  • Check electrical cords to make sure they are not running across doorways or under carpets where they are can get damaged.
  • Never put more than one plug in each receptacle. An outlet may have one or more receptacles – one to receive each plug.
  • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or fixture. Check the sticker on the lamp to determine the maximum wattage light bulb to use.
  • Light bulbs in the living area of your home should have a shade or globe for protection. Light bulbs can get very hot and cause a fire if something that can burn is too close to the bulb.
  • Heat-producing appliances such as a toaster, coffee maker, iron, or microwave draw a lot of electricity. Plug only one heat-producing appliance in each outlet to prevent wiring from overheating.

Even during this time of social distancing, electricians are still working and considered essential businesses in every state that has issued a shelter-in-place order. It’s critical that you call your utility company or qualified electrician immediately if you experience any of the following:

 

  • Frequent problems with blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers
  • A tingling feeling when you touch an electrical appliance
  • Discolored or warm wall outlets
  • A burning or rubbery smell coming from an appliance
  • Flickering or dimming lights
  • Sparks from an outlet

 

Keeping a watchful eye on our surroundings can go a long way to helping reduce the risk of possible injury and damage from fire. For more information on electrical safety in the home, please visit NFPA’s electrical safety webpage.

 

 

As all of us continue to navigate the evolving situation with COVID-19, NFPA remains committed to supporting you with the resources you need to minimize risk and help prevent loss, injuries, and death from fire, electrical, and other hazards. For information on NFPA’s response to the coronavirus, please visit our webpage.

 

With the arrival of summer and the July 4th holiday just around the corner, NFPA is reminding people about potential electrical hazards that exist in swimming pools, hot tubs and spas, onboard boats and in waters surrounding boats, marinas, and launch ramps.

Most people have never heard of nor are they aware of electrical dangers posed in water environments such as electric shock drowning (ESD), and each year people are injured or killed from these hazards.

Electric shock drowning happens when marina or onboard electrical systems leak electric current into the water. The current then passes through the body and causes paralysis. When this happens, a person can no longer swim and ultimately drowns. 

 

Here are tips for swimmers, pool and boat owners:

Tips for swimmers

  • Never swim near a marina, dock or boatyard, or near a boat while it’s running.
  • While in a pool, hot tub or spa, look out for underwater lights that are not working properly, flicker or work intermittently.
  • If you feel a tingling sensation while in a pool, immediately stop swimming in your current direction. Try and swim in a direction where you had not felt the tingling. Exit the water as quickly as possible; avoid using metal ladders or rails. Touching metal may increase the risk of shock.

 Tips for pool owners

  • If you are putting in a new pool, hot tub or spa, be sure the wiring is performed by an electrician experienced in the special safety requirements for these types of installations.
  • Have a qualified electrician periodically inspect and — where necessary — replace or upgrade the electrical devices or equipment that keep your pool, spa or hot tub electrically safe. Have the electrician show you how to turn off all power in case of an emergency.
  • Make sure any overhead lines maintain the proper distance over a pool and other structures, such as a diving board. If you have any doubts, contact a qualified electrician or your local utility company to make sure power lines are a safe distance away.

Tips for pool owners

  • Avoid entering the water when launching or loading a boat. Docks or boats can leak electricity into the water causing water electrification.
  • Each year, and after a major storm that affects the boat, have the boat’s electrical system inspected by a qualified marine electrician to be sure it meets the required codes of your area, including the American Boat & Yacht Council. Make the necessary repairs if recommended. Check with the marina owner who can also tell you if the marina’s electrical system has recently been inspected to meet the required codes of your area, including the National Electrical Code® (NEC).
  • Have ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) installed on the boat; use only portable GFCIs or shore power cords (including “Y” adapters) that are Marine Listed when using electricity near water. Test GFCIs monthly.

 

NFPA has additional resources for swimmers, boat and pool owners, including tip sheets, checklists, and more that can be downloaded and shared. Please visit www.nfpa.org/watersafety.

Since the early 2000s, the media has reported on  deaths from electric shock drowning (ESD), yet many people say they have never heard about this troubling trend. ESD can occur in swimming pools, hot tubs, spas, marinas, lakes and ponds, and it happens when faulty wiring sends an electrical current into the water. The current then passes through the body and causes paralysis. When this happens, a person can no longer swim and ultimately drowns. 

 

Some would argue the number of electric shock deaths reported are not that high, yet ESD severely injuries and kills many people a year. Why the discrepancy? ESD, unfortunately, is not easy to detect in an autopsy, which leads to ESD cases not being properly reported or investigated. In most cases, first responders have to rely on the accounts of eyewitnesses who hear cries for help and/or learn from other swimmers that they felt a tingling sensation in the water. Most often, the cases end up being reported as drownings and the real cause of death — electricity in the water — remains completely undetected.

 

Sounds scary? It is. All this month NFPA is raising awareness of electrical hazards in and around our homes during National Electrical Safety Month. As we head into Memorial Day weekend and the start of summer, we encourage people to learn more about the potential risks that exist in swimming pools, hot tubs and spas, on board boats and in the waters surrounding boats, marinas and launch ramps. The good news is, these deaths are preventable if we take the time to understand the dangers and obey the warning signs.

 

Our new video (below) is one way we’re helping educate people so we can all safely enjoy summer water activities. The video is meant to be shared and we invite you to give it to family members, friends and neighbors. After watching it, take the opportunity to start a discussion with those you love about the ways you can reduce your risk of ESD.

 

 

NFPA has a number of really great resources, too, for swimmers, boat and pool owners, as well as for marina operators including tip sheets, checklists, brochures and more that you can download, use (and share!) immediately. You can find everything at www.nfpa.org/watersafety. For more great insight on this topic, check out NFPA's electrical technical lead, Derek Vigstol's latest blog

 

As the summer months beckon us to the beauty of watering holes and backyard pools, let’s work together to help raise more awareness of this deadly problem so that all of us can stay safe this summer and throughout the year. 

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing. During this last week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we’re focusing on the importance of keeping stairwells clear for emergency evacuations.

 

For anyone who has lived in dorm room or off campus apartment, you know the rooms are small there is never enough space to store your belongings. But that doesn’t mean the hallway should act as a substitute closet. Keeping exit doors and the stairs clear of “stuff” allows students to make a fast escape in case of a fire.

 

The short video below features a local college student who provides this and a few other tips that point out the importance of keeping stairwells clear for emergencies.

 

 

If you’re a fire safety educator, a professional responsible for student safety on campus, or a parent, take a couple of seconds to review the video and share it with your student(s) on social media, online or in a face-face meeting. 

 

Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists, tip sheets you can share at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing. During this third week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we’re focusing on the dangers of overloading extension cords, power strips and outlets.

 

When it comes to college housing, there’s usually more than one person sharing the space and that means LOTS of computers, cell phones, iPads, appliances, lamps (need I keep going?) that need to be on and charged on a daily basis.

 

When you put too many plugs into an extension cord and load up an outlet, it’s important to remember you’re overloading the circuit, which in turns heats up and catches fire. The short video below features a local student who provides this and a few other tips that point out the correct way to use a power strip and outlet.

 

 

If you’re a fire safety educator, a professional responsible for student safety on campus, or a parent, take a couple of seconds to review the video and share it with your student(s) on social media, online or in a face-face meeting. 

 

Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists and our  student-to-student tip sheet at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

college fire safety, study abroad

 

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing.During this second week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we want to focus on fire safety for students studying abroad.

 

In 2011, a fast-moving fire swept through a building in Paris that killed four people and injured many others. Three of the victims were students studying abroad. The building where they lived had no smoke alarms, no fire escapes, and only narrow wooden stairwells that became overcrowded and impassable in the fire.


When it comes to college students, including those traveling and studying abroad, we can't emphasize safety enough. Other countries approach fire safety and public education differently, according to a column in the January/February 2017 NFPA Journal issue called, Fire Safety Abroad. It's on us to understand these differences and take the appropriate steps to help ensure the safety of our young adults when they go overseas.Three of these tips include:


• Take a couple of battery-operated smoke alarms with you and place them in the apartment
• Try and live on a low floor so you can be reached by a fire truck ladder
• Choose a residence made of brick or stone rather than wood and with unobstructed windows


As students apply for and prepare for semester abroad programs, review these simple but lifesaving measures. As a fire safety educator or parent, take the time to talk to your student(s) about the risks and the steps they can take to stay safe from fire while away from home. 


Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists and our student-to student checklist at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

campus fire safety, fire safety abroad, student fire safety

September is Campus Fire Safety Month and NFPA and The Center for Campus Fire Safety (The Center) are working together to help raise awareness of the dangers of fires among college-aged students who live in on- and off-campus housing.

 

During this first week of our “Campus Fire Safety for Students” campaign, we want to focus on household appliances. In the whirlwind of our morning routine there’s always a chance we’ll forget our keys or lunch or (fill in your own item!). Add in distractions like texts or work/school email and it’s more likely we’ll walk out the door without remembering to turn off the lights or more importantly, turn off appliances that generate heat and increase our risk for fire (think:  coffee pots, hair straighteners, etc.).

 

The short video below hosted by a local student provides a quick reminder about the importance of turning off appliances.

 

If you’re a fire safety educator, a professional responsible for student safety on campus, or a parent, take a couple of seconds to review the video and share it with your student(s) on social media, online or in a face-face meeting. 

 

Learn more about the campaign and get additional resources like checklists and our campus fire safety tip sheet at www.nfpa.org/campus and www.campusfiresafety.org.

grilling, grilling fire safety, fourth of July

With summer in full swing, many of us are busy preparing menus, and our grills, for all the barbecues, backyard soirees and beach parties we’ll be hosting (and attending!).

 

But before you fire up that grill, NFPA is reminding people to brush up on their grilling skills. According to our reports, July is the peak month for grilling fires and we want everyone to play it safe.

Not sure where to start? Here are some resources to help:

• A "Grilling Fire Safety Tips" video that takes you through four quick steps to help you make the right decisions when it comes time to turn on (and turn off) that grill.
Checklists and tip sheets provide best practices for when you’re actually cooking on the grill.
• Tips for outdoor cooking with portable grills for when you head to the park, beach or campground.
• A "Simple Test for Checking Gas Grill Leaks" video that provides basic tips on how to prepare your grill before your first cookout of the season.

 

All of these resources can be downloaded for free and make it easy for you to follow along as you start cooking for family and friends. There's even information about how to keep fire safe while entertaining guests outside at your home. Share them with friends and family!

 

This holiday and throughout the summer, NFPA wants everyone to keep grilling fire safety top of mind. Start now by checking out our grilling fire safety webpage for all of these resources and more. You’ll find that if you do, you’ll be able to create wonderful memories and meals now and for months to come!

So play it safe, everyone, and have a great summer!

electric shock drowning, ESD, marina safety, boating safety, pool safety

 

Since the early 2000s, the media has reported on a number of deaths from electric shock drowning (ESD). What is ESD? If you haven't heard about it before, you're not alone. Unfortunately, ESD is not well known. ESD occurs when faulty wiring sends an electrical current into the water. The current then passes through the body and causes paralysis, and ultimately results in drowning. ESD can occur in swimming pools, hot tubs, spas, marinas, lakes and ponds.

 

 

Some would argue the number of electric shock deaths reported are not that high, yet ESD severely injuries and kills many people a year. Why the discrepancy? Due to how difficult its detection is, drownings caused by ESD are not properly reported or investigated because autopsies won’t reveal any evidence of ESD. In most cases, first responders have to rely on the accounts of eyewitnesses who hear cries for help or they learn from other swimmers that they felt a tingling sensation in the water. Most often, the cases end up being reported as drownings, and the real cause of death — the electricity in the water — remains completely undetected.


Sounds scary? It is. And now with summer in full swing, NFPA and Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) are joining forces to remind people about the potential electrical hazards that exist in swimming pools, hot tubs and spas, on board boats and in the waters surrounding boats, marinas and launch ramps. The good news is, these deaths are preventable if we take the time to understand the risks and obey the warning signs.

 

Our new video (above) is one way we’re helping to educate people so we can all safely enjoy summer water activities.The video is meant to be shared and we invite you to give it to family members, friends and neighbors. After watching it, take the opportunity to start a discussion with those you love about the ways you can reduce your risk of ESD.

 

NFPA and ESFI have a number of really great resources, too, for swimmers, boat and pool owners, as well as for marina operators including tip sheets, checklists, brochures and more that you can download and use (and share!) immediately. You can find everything at www.nfpa.org/watersafety and on ESFI’s website.

 

Starting today, let's work together on eliminating injuries and drownings from electric shock so all of us can stay safe this summer and throughout the year. 

GFCI, electrical safety month, consumers, electrical safety

May is Electrical Safety Month and NFPA and ESFI are working together to help raise awareness of electrical hazards.


During this last week of the campaign, we’re raising awareness of the importance of GFCIs and AFCIs. While these acronyms may look like alphabet soup, they’re actually important devices that can help keep you and your loved ones safer from shock and electrocution.

 

The formal name for AFCI is “arc-fault circuit-interrupters.” When an electrical switch is opened or closed, an arc (or more simply put, a discharge of electricity across a circuit) occurs. Unintentional arcs can occur at loose connections or where wires or cords have been damaged. Such arcs can lead to high temperatures and sparking, possibly igniting flammable materials. AFCIs protect against fire by continuously monitoring the electrical current in a circuit and shutting off the circuit when unintended arcing occurs.

 

A GFCI (ground-fault circuit-interrupter) works similarly to an AFCI. A ground-fault is an unintentional electrical path between a source of electrical current and a grounded surface. Electrical shock can occur if a person comes into contact with an energized part. GFCIs can greatly reduce the risk of shock by immediately shutting off an electrical circuit when that circuit represents a shock hazard (i.e. when a person comes in contact with a faulty appliance and a grounded surface).

 

Are you wondering if these devices actually make a difference? Well, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), about 50% of home electrocutions have been prevented by the introduction of GFCIs! That’s great news!

 

Does your home have life-saving AFCIs or GFCIs? Contact a qualified electrician who can survey the house and install these devices properly to help prevent shock and electrocution from happening in your home. Once installed, download ESFI’s infographic, which takes you through the steps for testing these devices monthly. If you have any questions or concerns, your electrician will be able to answer them for you.


More information about AFCIs and GFCIs and Electrical Safety Month can be found on NFPA’s electrical safety webpage and at www.esfi.org.

electrical safety, electrical safety month, outdoor electrical safety

 

During this last week of our national Electrical Safety Month campaign, NFPA and ESFI are reminding people about the importance of outdoor electrical safety. We raise this issue because we know many homeowners love the look and feel that outdoor lighting brings to the exterior of our houses and landscaping, but we must also know that electrical projects come with some hazards, too.

 

As you embark on an electrical project for the exterior of your home, you’ll want to contact a qualified electrician who can safely provide all of the electrical work for you. Some additional tips to keep in mind:

 

• Call “Before You Dig” (8-1-1) before any digging on your property. They will mark where your underground utilities are located. It’s a free service!
• Have a professional tree cutting service trim branches that might fall on electric wiring. Report downed wires to authorities right away.
• Use extension cords that are listed by a qualified test laboratory and are marked for outdoor use.

 

There are many more great ideas you can put into practice today as you embark on an outdoor electrical project. Download NFPA’s tip sheet and keep it handy for reference.

 

Get additional information, tips and resources about electrical safety from NFPA’s electrical safety webpage and at www.esfi.org.

electrical safety month, electrical safety, tip sheet, ESFI, home electrical safety

May is national Electrical Safety Month and throughout the month, NFPA and ESFI have been raising awareness of potential home electrical hazards and the importance of electrical fire safety.


This week we’re highlighting our updated “Keeping Your Community Safe and Energized” toolkit for the fire service. From customized news releases and letters to the editor, to tip sheets (also available in Spanish) and talking points, the toolkit provides resources to help local fire departments spread the word about electrical safety to residents. Just download the information you need, print it out and distribute. Or take advantage of the great information available and provide tips and ideas in your newsletter or on social media. .


Learn more about electrical fire safety on NFPA’s campaign webpage and at www.esfi.org, and stay tuned for more great resources throughout the month!

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