Skip navigation
All Places > International Fire Marshals Association > Blog

Fire Executive Management Training Program (FEMT)

The Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas is partnering with the Texas Fire Marshals' Association to provide the first executive management training session for the discipline in the nation. The program will address the professional qualifications for fire marshals and evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to meet essential tasks of the job based on National Fire Protection Association standard 1037. The program also will focus on the day-to-day operations of the job as well as community risk assessments and resource distribution. Admission to the program will be on a competitive basis through an application process.

Class is September 11th-15th, 2017.  To view details and registration

click here: FEMT Info and Registration

Topics Covered / Course Objectives

  • Review laws, codes, standards, and regulatory agencies governing fire marshals
  • Manage budgets, records, information and human resources for your agency
  • Develop strategic planning
  • Evaluate community risk management
  • Improve community relations strategies for fire and life safety
  • Participate in professional development
  • Learn advanced fire prevention, inspection and education techniques

Who Should Attend / Admission Requirements

  • Hold a certification as a fire inspector, fire investigator or public educator (Acceptable certifications include those through TCFP, IFSAC, Pro Board, SFFMA, ICC, or NFPA)
  • Have current appointment as a fire marshal or receive waiver granted by the Texas Fire Marshal Professional Development Program
  • Completed TCOLE Course 3737, TCFP Fire Officer I or II, or hold bachelor's degrees in business or public administration or other approved fields of study

Course Length

Fire Executive Management Training Program (FEMT) is held in two, 40-hour modules.

Course Hours

Participants receive 40 hours of TCOLE credit per module

Course Cost / Fee Policy

Fire Executive Management Training Program (FEMT) is $1000 per person.

Registration Process

Applicants begin the FEMT process by submitting an application. Applications are accepted during a specified timeframe. Please download the FEMT FMPDP application from the table of Upcoming Events (below) and note these dates.

All incoming applications will be processed and those selected by the board who meet all requirements will receive an email regarding registration and payment process. You will not receive confirmation of the class until your payment has been received.

Course Contact

Andrea Hoke, Project Coordinator
Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas
George J. Beto Criminal Justice Building
Sam Houston State University
Huntsville, TX 77341-2417
Fax: (936) 294-3926
Phone: (936) 294-3702
Phone: 800-477-9248
ahoke@shsu.edu

In support of national Lightning Safety Awareness Week, June 18-24.

#LightningSafetyWeek, #LightningProtection, #NFPA780 

The NWS and NOAA launched the National Lightning Safety Awareness Week campaign in 2001 to raise awareness about the dangers of lightning, a deadly, yet underrated killer. The Lightning Protection Institute joined the campaign effort in 2007 as partners, to provide messaging about lightning protection for structures, and explain how NFPA 780 Safety Standard-compliant LPS can make safe places safer. Since the beginning of the campaign, lightning deaths in the U.S. have dramatically dropped. Unfortunately, property and structural losses due to lightning continue to rise.

In support of this year’s LSA Week campaign, June 18-24, LPI is emphasizing the importance of protecting people, property and places. Once again, we are partnering with the National Lightning Safety Council to encourage awareness and share information throughout the week on several topics:

  • Sunday: An Introduction to Lightning and Lightning Safety
  • Monday: The Science of Lightning and Thunder
  • Tuesday: Lightning Safety Outdoors
  • Wednesday: Lightning Safety Indoors
  • Thursday: Lightning Safety and Sports Activities
  • Friday: Medical Effects on Lightning Victims
  • Saturday: Protecting Your Home from Lightning

Help us build lightning safe communities by learning more about lightning’s dangers, and by sharing these important safety and protection resources! Finally, please remember to heed the advice of our pal and lightning safety ambassador, Lion the Lightning Lion: “When thunder roars, go indoors!”

    Is it a part of the human condition that we universally need to learn through our own experience what is best for each of us?  We seem curiously and inexplicably unable to heed advice from those who know better than ourselves what may be in our own best interest.  We can all understand and agree that at a very early age when a toddler begins to walk that he needs protected from himself.  A toddler has no capacity to understand what may be harmful; so we insulate him from common, everyday hazards and he has really little capacity to resist the efforts made on his behalf.  As our toddler begins to grow both physically and mentally, it becomes necessary to teach him how to begin to recognize the dangers around him.  When he reaches for the stove in use we say, "Hot!" so he understands not to touch the stove and get burned.  Invariably though, he will most likely eventually reach for the stove and burn himself before he truly understands the advice given in his own best interest.  He had to learn the hard way.  

     We continue to make rules for our young children, into their teen years, and all the way to adulthood to protect them from themselves.  How often I would find myself thinking, "If he would just listen to me; I've already been through this situation and made the mistake I can see coming."  But again, he has to learn the hard way.  But then it hits me....it's not just him; I myself was no different.  I was no better at taking advice from my parents or wiser, more experienced elders; I always had to learn the hard way as well.  

     So is learning the hard way part of the human condition?  I believe it is hardwired into our very existence and continues throughout our lives.  In a subsequent blog, I will illustrate how this phenomenon affects our lives as adults and finally discuss how it influences our overall approach as humans that "must learn the hard way" to fire safety and fire code compliance.

If you know me you know I am an avid hockey fan and Chicago Blackhawks fan and usually when anything goes against rivaled St. Louis Blues, it generally makes me smile. However, it was comments made by St. Louis Blues General Manager Doug Armstrong after the firing of longtime head coach Ken Hitchcock that really took me by surprise.  Instead of airing dirty laundry about what one player may have thought about the coach or philosophical differences between upper management and the coaching staff, Armstrong took a much different approach and it’s one that caused me to think about my role as a fire chief and the men and women we hire. 

 

“One of the things I’ve learned about being around St. Louis is the Cardinals,” Armstrong said. “They don’t have independent contractors. When they do, they get rid of them. We have a sense of independent contractors…we need to become a team again.” I found GM Armstrong’s comments to be quite relevant for the situation with the Blues and perhaps in many firehouses across the country. Whether your department is career or volunteer, a lack of teamwork can cause dysfunction in even the best organizations.

 

Each member brings a certain set of built-in skills when they come through the door. It may be their mechanical ability, engineering background, nursing, athletics or the military. If you have members with special skills which they bring into your organization, seize the opportunity to further develop those skills so they can spread their knowledge to others.

 

I have seen many cases where firefighters act individually and neglect the team. If a firefighter is more concerned about his/her outcomes, they become consumed by themselves and break away from the team.  As a recruit training is essential in mastering core competencies. When I began my fire service career, my recruit class was larger than most. We had approximately 19 recruits and some of the Firefighter II curriculum came easier from some than others. What resonated with me was how the ones who “got it” with greater ease took time to pick up the others who were struggling. If all 19 recruits would have acted like independent contractors, some of the recruits would have most likely dropped out for not meeting academic standards, and more importantly, because they didn’t feel part of the team.

 

I worked for a battalion chief at one point in my career who tried to make me believe that the fire service has a place for individual effort.  As much as I believe individual achievement is good, incorporating knowledge, skill and expertise into the team makes the individual great.  When your department is looking for new members, ask yourself, “Is this person a team player or an independent contractor?” Demand teamwork; our profession doesn’t need spectators, but is always in need of solid teammates.

There has been a significant interest recently by our national media regarding occupant load capacities and we would like to provide the following information to the general public.  Fire Marshals are appointed by their jurisdictions to ensure compliance with adopted fire and life safety standards based on local needs.  Fire Marshals have many duties one being the determination of occupant loads for places where large numbers of people gather.  The factor for determining these occupant loads are based on tragic events, science, expert review and final approval by standards organizations.  The methods outlined to determine occupant loads leave little room for interpretation.  These factors take into account people having to leave in the event of an emergency but also for public safety officials to gain access for fire, medical, security and other issues.  It is up to the event planner, venue management, fire marshals and other public safety staff to ensure the safety of all those participating and attending the event.  Event planners should meet with venue management well in advance of the proposed event to make sure the facility will handle the expected crowds, if not, limiting tickets or the numbers to be admitted, or other venues may need to be sought.  If you have questions contact the local fire marshal in advance for guidance.  Remember that the Fire Marshal has the final legal authority on fire and life safety issues within the jurisdiction.  Event planners, venue management, the fire marshal, the community or those attending do not wish to be a tragic story on the 6 o’clock news.

 

The mission of the International Fire Marshals Association (IFMA) is to aid in the preservation of life and property by advocating, promoting and providing leadership in the prevention or mitigation of fire, explosions and other related hazardous conditions. Established in 1906, as the Fire Marshals Association of North America, IFMA currently has more than 1,800 members worldwide and 34 Chapters.

 

Fire Marshals and Occupant Loads

 

There has been a significant interest recently by our national media regarding occupant load capacities and we would like to provide the following information to the general public.  Fire Marshals are appointed by their jurisdictions to ensure compliance with adopted fire and life safety standards based on local needs.  Fire Marshals have many duties one being the determination of occupant loads for places where large numbers of people gather.  The factor for determining these occupant loads are based on tragic events, science, expert review and final approval by standards organizations.  The methods outlined to determine occupant loads leave little room for interpretation.  These factors take into account people having to leave in the event of an emergency but also for public safety officials to gain access for fire, medical, security and other issues.  It is up to the event planner, venue management, fire marshals and other public safety staff to ensure the safety of all those participating and attending the event.  Event planners should meet with venue management well in advance of the proposed event to make sure the facility will handle the expected crowds, if not, limiting tickets or the numbers to be admitted, or other venues may need to be sought.  If you have questions contact the local fire marshal in advance for guidance.  Remember that the Fire Marshal has the final legal authority on fire and life safety issues within the jurisdiction.  Event planners, venue management, the fire marshal, the community or those attending do not wish to be a tragic story on the 6 o’clock news.

 

The mission of the International Fire Marshals Association (IFMA) is to aid in the preservation of life and property by advocating, promoting and providing leadership in the prevention or mitigation of fire, explosions and other related hazardous conditions. Established in 1906, as the Fire Marshals Association of North America, IFMA currently has more than 1,800 members worldwide and 34 Chapters.

section reception image.png

fieldhog

applicable nfpa occupancy

Posted by fieldhog Feb 23, 2016


Hi,..  I believe the type of building/occupancy determines the specific nfpa codes applicable for that building,.... does anyone know where I can find this information..??  thanks. fieldhog.